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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1908)"

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2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908. 




DID YOU EVER HEAR OF AN 
OFFER LIKE THIS? 

Useful and Beautiful 

No other firm could offer this 
but us. 

This is the first time we have 
ever made this offer — this beauti- 
ful four-piece set of Silverware 
( guaranteed) , full size for family 
use, packed in case. 

For Only 97c 



It is done solely to advertise our product and only one 
set will be sent to each family, with positively no duplicate or- 
ders. The plate is heavy and the pattern one of the latest and 
most fashionable — the famous "Rose." The pieces are 
FIT TO GRACE ANY TABLE AND WILL LAST FOR YEARS 

ORDER TO-DAY 




This price includes all packing, shipping and de- 
livery charges prepaid to your door. Send cash 
money order, or 2c stamps to Dept. E., 



Rogers Silverware Co., 



No. 114 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 



SURPLUS $3,200,000 



The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the fire of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in fire and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 



(* <j* ,g* »2* »*«•$> .J, .J. »J. •*. .J. »$• .*. «J, tf .J, »J. *J, .J, .J» .J. »J. »J. .J. .J, »J» «J. »J» A »J. »J* 

+ 

* 



The ROSS McMAHON 
Awning and Tent Co. 



•I* *5* *»* *** **■* •»■* *J* *5* *»* *** •«* *** "I* "J* *5» *5* *3»' 

I 
* 
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t 



I 

* i 

* Tents, Hammocks, Awnings and Covers. Camping Outfits for Hunting 7 
.;. and Fishing Trips. J 



73 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



i Phone Temporary 2030. ? 

McMurray - McMurray 

McMURRAY 

Sulkies and 
Jogging 
Carts 

Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 
prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 

McMurray - McMurray 




n' 



Four more In 2:16 have already been credited thi« season to 



"McKINNEY" 2:liy 4 



Making his wondeiful list still more remarkable. 



SoVlh , .° g joS.TIW Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The Stallion Number 



OF THE 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Will lie issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

If You Own a Stallion 

Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number will reach every man on the 
( dast who owns a good mare. 

If You Own a Mare 

You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
tain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
mi what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 

If so, you will lie interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will he valuable and 
entertaining. 



In place of getting out the usual large Christmas 
number of the Breeder and Sportsman last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February loth was selected 
as Christinas conies too early for an issue of this descrip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wish illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. Write 
for price and particulars. 



nh'EKDEh' AM) SPORTSMAN 
s.\X FRANCISCO, CAL, 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KKLLET, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 

OFFICE: 616 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Posto/flce. 



Terms— One Tear J3; Six Months J1.75; Three Months Jl 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A SPECIAL STALLION NUMBER of the Breeder 
and Sportsman will be issued on Saturday, February 
15th, 190S. It has been the custom of this journal 
to issue a large illustrated edition of the paper 
during the Christmas holidays, which was made the 
medium of advertising stallions that would be in 
service on the Coast during the ensuing season, but 
as that date has been found to be a little too early 
for many stallion owners to know just where their 
horses would be kept during the season, terms, etc., 
it was decided to issue our big annual edition this 
time on February 15th. Breeders and horsemen 
generally will endorse this change of date and will 
readily recognize the especial value of an edition 
that will be able to give accurate information as to 
the whereabouts and service fees for 1908 of all 
the leading stallions on this Coast. A large number 
of owners have already engaged space in this spe- 
cial issue, and we believe it will be the most valuable 
edition ever issued by this journal. Our Mr. J. R. 
Fronefield has already visited several localities and 
secured many advertisements and will visit Los An- 
geles and other southern points in the interest of 
this journal during the coming week. Every stallion 
that will make the season of 1908 on the Pacific 
Coast should be represented in the Special Stallion 
number, out February 15th. 



GOVERNOR HUGHES OF NEW YORK, who is 
being prominently mentioned as the candidate of 
the Republican party for President, recommends in 
his annual message to the New York Legislature, 
that laws be passed which will completely suppress 
all race track betting. Governor Hughes, in his mes- 
sage recites the New York constitutional provision 
forbidding lotteries, pool selling, book making or 
any other form of gambling within the State and 
empoyering the Legislature to fix penalties there- 
for and urges the amendment of the Penal Code 
which prescribes the punishment for pool selling 
at race tracks, forfeiture of the money paid by the 
bettor to be recovered. The message continues: 
"The Constitution makes no exception of race 
tracks. I recommend that the Legislature carry out 
the clear direction of the ppople without discrimi- 
nation. In conclusion with the repeal of the existing 
exceptions I recommend that the offense described 
in the Penal Code should be punished by imprison- 
ment and that the alternative of fines should be 
abolished." It is not often that a man who is a 
Presidential candidate has the courage to take such 
a decided stand on a question that will array 
against him such powerful influences as the New 
York racing associations, but the growing evil of 
race track gambling is such that statesmen in all 
parts of the country are now openly asking for its 
suppression. It is not harness racing which has 
aroused this antagonism, but the prostitution of the 
thoroughbred to a mere gambling machine that has 
done it. 



A HARNESS RACE PROGRAM should fit the 
conditions which exist in the section of country 
where the meeting is to be held. If there are two 
or three horses that outclass all others of a particu- 
lar class, and it is known that they will be raced, 
it is almost useless to offer a race for that class wilh 
the expectation of getting a dozen entries. Horsemen 
who have horses in training generally know what 
the other fellows have,* and will refuse to enter in 
races where they have no chance for anything 
better than fourth money in the race. Secretaries 



should study the Year Book, visit the training tracks 
and post themselves thoroughly in regard to the 
horses in training and then they will be prepared 
to arrange programs that will fill. Early meetings, 
those that are held during the first two or three 
weeks of the circuit, can generally get a pretty gen- 
erous lot of entries for any old program, as there 
is always a host of green horses and those with slow 
records whose owners desire to try them out in early 
races just to see if they will do, but later on when 
the horses begin to show, a program must be ar- 
arrnged with some intelligence and judgment to "fill 
to the satisfaction of the board," and to get enough 
starters to make it interesting. There are horses 
that have no record, but are known to be cracker- 
jacks that must be provided "against", or other 
owners will stay out of that race, while there are 
dozens of 2:30 trotters that can be brought together 
in what will probably prove the hottest kind of a 
contest, if the Secretary is only wise enough to know- 
it and make the conditions agreeable to their own- 
ers. If California had a regularly organized cir- 
cuit, the associations could afford to pay an expert 
to ascertain all the facts about the horses in train- 
ing each year, and make programs for them that 
would furnish good racing at every meeting. With- 
out such organization, however, little can be done 
unless an association is fortunate enough to have a 
Secretary that knows the business. 



THE HORSE BOOK is a recent publication from 
the pen of J. H. S. Johnstone, assistant editor of 
the Chicago Breeders' Gazette, and published by that 
journal. It is a well printed work of 400 pages, and 
is a treatise on horse breeding, written more par- 
ticularly for the farmer and student. Part I treats 
of the origin of the horse, heredity as a force, em- 
bryology, management of stallions, broodmares and 
foals, fitting for market, sale and show ring. Part 
II treats of the breeds, chapters being devoted to 
all known breeds of the horse. Part III is devoted 
to hygiene, unsoundness and disease. There is an 
appendix which gives the stallion lien laws of all 
the States and Territories which have enacted such 
legislation. The book has many fine illustrations and 
is written in an entertaining manner. It is sold at 
$2, sent prepaid by mail or express. Address 
Sanders Publishing Co., 358 Dearborn street, Chicago. 



THE CHICAGO HORSE REVIEW has made new 
conditions for its popular Futurity, which should 
make it still more popular. In this new stake 
every subscriber to the paper at $2.50 per y§ar has 
the privilege of nominating without cost every mare 
bred in 1907 that he owns. On November 1, 1908, 
when the foals will be weaned, a payment of $5 
will be made on each weanling, and on May 1, 1909, 
another payment of $5 will be due on each yearling. 
There are no other payments except starting pay- 
ments. As the stake is guaranteed to be worth $12,- 
500, it should be a very* attractive one to breeders. 
The fact that by. the payment of $2.50 a person can 
get a yearly subscription to the Horse Review and 
nominate every mare he owns in a $12,500 Futurity 
should appeal to every horseman who knows a good 
thing when he sees it. 



THE NORTH PACIFIC RURAL SPIRIT of Port- 
land, Oregon, issued a splendid holiday number of 
close to 100 pages that we think lays over anything 
this excellent journal has previously gotten out. It 
is chuck full of matters of interest to all breeders of 
live stock and has been elaborately illustrated with 
fine half-tones. 



TROTTERS AND PACERS FOR AUSTRALIA. 

On the steamer Kelvinbank, which sailed from San 
Francisco last Tuesday for Melbourne, Australia, 
were twenty-one head of trotters and pacers, which 
is without question the best consignment in breed- 
ing and individuality that ever left California for 
the land of the mid-summer Christmas. 

Eighteen of these horses were purchased by Mr. 
Andrew Robertson for Allendale Stock Farm, Men- 
tone, near Melbourne, and the remaining three were 
consigned by Thomas Bonner to Mr. W. B. Viers of 
Melbourne, who Is an American of several years' 
residence in Australia, and who already owns a 
number of California bred trotters and pacers. 

Mr. Robertson has been in California for the past 
two months selecting the horses for Allendale Farm, 
and has most favorably impressed all who have had 
dealings with him, as being a fair-dealing gentleman, 
who is an excellent judge of a horse, as well as a 
close student of breeding. He has selected stallions 
and brood-mares that will be valuable acquisitions 
to the trotting-horse breeding ranks of Australasia, 



and it is perfectly safe to predict that from them 
will come many future fast performers and race 
winners on the Australian tracks. 

The complete list of the horses taken by Mr. 
Robertson on his trip is as follows: 
Stallions. 

Marvin Wilkes 2:12%. bay stallion. 15.3%. foaled 
1901, sired by Don Marvin 2:22, dam Nora S. by 
Sable Wilkes 2:18. Bred by Walter Mastin of Sacra- 
mento. 

Medium Direct, black stallion, 15.3, foaled 1904, 
sired by Rey Direct 2:10, dam Missie Medium by 
Rampart. Bred by Geo. A. Davis, Pleasanton. This 
colt was called Little Rey by his breeder, but has 
never been officially named. 

Tertius, black stallion, 15.2, foaled 1903, sired by 
McKinney 2:11%. dam She 2:12% by Abbotsford. 
Bred by Chris Smith, San Mateo, sold by W. A. 
Clark Jr.. of Los Angeles. 

Hal Zolock, brown stallion, foaled 1906, sired by 
Zolock 2:05%, dam Belle Pointer by Sky Pointer, 
brother to Star Pointer 1:59%. Bred by Mrs. L. J. 
Hastings, Los Angeles. 

Lou Doble, bay stallion, foaled 1906, sired by Kin- 
ney Lou 2:07%, dam Marguerite by Tom Benton. 
Bred by Mrs. J. L. McCord, Sacramento, sold by 
Henry Delaney. 

Brown colt, foaled 1905, sired by Chas. Derby 2:20, 
dam Tone, dam of Agitato 2:09, by Ferguson. Bred 
by Oakwood Park Stock Farm; sold by W. C. 
I lelman. 

Bay colt, foaled 1907, sired by Bon Voyage 2:12%. 
dam Bessie McKinney by McKinney 2:11%, second 
dam Stemwinder, dam of Directum 2:05%. Bred 
by Geo. A. Davis, . Pleasanton. 

Mares. 

Christobel 2:11% (registered as Rosario) by 
Chas. Derby 2:20, dam Algerdetta, dam of Thornway 
2:05%, etc., by Allandorf. Bred by Oakwood Park 
Stock Farm. In foal to Star Pointer 1:59%. Sold 
by W. A. Clark Jr. 

Bay filly, foaled 1906, by Hal B. 2:04%, dam 
Christobel 2:11% as above. Sold by W. A. Clark 
Jr. 

Bessie McKinney, black mare by McKinney 2:11%, 
dam Stemwinder, dam of Directum 2:05% by 
Venture. Bred by Geo. A. Davis. 

Florence McKinney, bay mare by McKinney 2:11%, 
dam Mission Belle. This mare is an own sister to 
John Rowan's stallion Mechanic. Sold by John 
Rowan. 

Biddy, gray mare by Re-Election, dam Irish Lady 
by Wilkes Boy. Bred to Star Pointer 1:59% in 
December, 1907. Sold by Thos. Bonner. 

Directess, brown mare by Direct 2:05%, dam Dusk 
by Dawn. In foal to Bon Voyage 2:12%. Sold by 
M. C. Delano. 

Elsie Downs, brown mare, foaled 1898, by Boodle 
2:12%, dam Lynda Oak 2:18%, dam of Dr. Frasse 
2:11%, etc., by Guy Wilkes 2:15%. Bred by J. W. 
Rea. Sold by W. W. Mendenhall. 

Babbie 2:13, bay mare by Welcome 2:10%, dam 
sister to Cricket 2:10 by Steinway. Babbie is own 
sister to Cavalier 2:11%. Bred and sold by H. W. 
Meek. 

Babe McKinney, black mare by McKinney 2:11%, 
dam Babe by Ferdinand. 

Bay mare, foaled 1904 by Stam B. 2:11%, dam 
Elsie Downs by Boodle 2:12%. Sold by W. W. 
Mendenhall. 

Bay mare by Falrose, bred by Walter Mastin, 
Sacramento. 

Nearly all the above mares are in foal to first-class 
stallions. 

The Veirs Consignment. 

The three mares purchased by Thos. Bonner of 
this city and shipped to Mr. W. B. Veirs of Mel- 
bourne, are the following: 

Chestnut mare, own sister to Robert I. 2:08%, and 
three others in the list. Sired by Hambletonian 
Wilkes, dam Anna Belle 2:27 by Dawn 2:18%. 

Palomita, black mare foaled 1904, sired by Arner 
2:17% (own brother to Don Derby 2:04%. Diablo 
2:09%). dam by Rustic. Bred by H. Busing. 

Reta B., brown mare foaled 1900, sired by Boodle 
Jr. 34,834, dam Gabilan Girl by Gabilan 19932. 

o 

ARABIANS MOSTLY GRAY. 



In a most interesting article in Harpers Monthly 
for January. Dr. Henry Van Dyke tells of a trip he 
recently made from the Springs of Jordan to Da- 
mascus. On the way he saw many Arabian horses 
and thus describes them: "There is something very 
attractive about these Arabian horses as you see 
them in their own country. They are spirited, fear- 
less, sure-footed, and yet, as a rule, so docile that, 
they may be ridden with a halter. They are good 
for a long journey, or a swift run, or a 'fantasia.' 
The prevailing color among them is gray, but you 
see many bays and sorrels, and a few splendid 
blacks. An Arabian stallion satisfies the romantic 
ideal of how a horse ought to look. His arched 
neck, small head, large eyes wide apart, short body, 
round flanks, delicate pasterns, and little feet; the 
way he tosses his mane and cocks his flowing tall 
when he is on parade; the swiftness and spring of 
his gallop, the dainty grace of his walk — when you 
see these things you recognize at onee (lie real, 
original horse which the painters use to depict 
in their Portrait of General X on his Favorite 
Charger.' I asked the guide what one of these 
fine creatures would cost 'A good one two or three 
hundred dollars; an extra good one four hundred; 
a fancy one — who knows?" " 



1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908. 



THE LEADING SIRES. 



The year 1907 will go down into horse history as 
the one season during which the compilation of 
racing statistics was most difficult. The tele- 
graphers' strike during the summer prevented any- 
thing but the most meagre reports from the smaller 
meetings, and our readers all know how incomplete 
were the returns sent in from the Grand Circuit to 
the press of San Francisco. For this reason the com- 
pilation of statistics has been a very difficult matter 
during the year, and until the Year Book is printed 
it will almost, be impossible to prepare them with 
any pretense at accuracy. The eastern horse papers, 
notably The Horse Review of Chicago, have ex- 
pended a great deal of labor and money in an effort 
to get full reports of the thousands of harness 
meetings held in the United States during the year, 
and the tables in their holiday editions are as com- 
plete as they could be made under the circumstances. 

One of the most interesting of these is the list 
of leading sires of the country, from which we have 
taken the following facts of particular interest to 
Pacific Coast readers. 

The leading sire of new standard performers for 
the year is Allerton 2:09%, who has no less than 
twenty-one new ones to his credit, but of this long 
list but three have records of 2:20 or better and 
but one is in the 2:15 list, his fastest new one be- 
ing the trotter Todd Allerton 2:12%, that had a 
previous record of 2:13 at the pacing gait. Allerton 
at twenty -one years of age has a total of 178 stand- 
ard performers to his credit. 

Next to Allerton in the number of new performers 
is Prodigal 2:16, with nineteen to his credit, giv- 
ing him a total of 89 standard performers all told. 
Five of the new ones are in the 2:20 list, and four 
are in the 2:15 list, the fastest being the pacer 
Moy 2:07%. 

Fourteen-year-old liingen comes next with thirteen 
new performers, six of which are of the 2:20 class 
and two in the 2:15 list. Bingen's fastest new one 
is the four-year-old trotter Codero 2:09%. Bingen 
lvas a total now of 37 standard performers. 

The pacer Galileo Rex has the same number of 
new ones that Bingen has — thirteen — but he has 
only three in the 2:20 list, and his fastest new 
performer only took a record of 2:17%. His total 
list to date numbers 27. 

McKinney 2:11% has an even dozen new standard 
performers to his credit, and of these seven are in 
the 2:20 list and six in the 2:15 list. McKinney 
is rapidly approaching the list of century sires, hav- 
ing now a total of 97 standard performers, and out- 
ranks all other stallions by having 17 in 2:10, 
44 in 2:15, and 62 in 2:20. He is twenty years old. 

Arion 2:07% also has twelve new performers this 
season, of which two trotted in 2:20 or better and 
one took a record of 2:13%. Arion now has 44 in 
the list at the age of eighteen. 

In the entire list of sixty-two stallions that had 
five or more new performers in 1907, but two will 
be in service on the Pacific Coast in 1908. These 
two are Zombro and Redlac. Zombro stands thirteen- 
th in this list, with nine new ones to his credit, of 
in this list, with nine new ones to his credit, of 
which seven are in the 2:20 list, four in the 2:15 
list and two in the 2:10 list Redlac has five new 
l>erformers,of which El Red 2:10% is the fastest. 
Of the sixty-two stallions in this list of leading 
sires, thirty-one are direct descendants of Geo. 
Wilkes and twelve of Electioneer. 



WHAT ABOUT THE CIRCUIT. 



During the summer season of 1907 California had 
a harness-racing circuit that was quite a suceess. 
Starting at San Diego with a two days* meeting in 
June, there was a long jump to Salinas, where an 
excellent four days' program was given. Thence 
the horses were shipped to Pleasanton for four days' 
fine racing; then came in succession the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' meeting at Santa 
Rosa, the Stover meeting at Petaluma, the Woodland 
meeting and the California State Fair. There was 
excellent racing and fast time at all these tracks, 
and the attendance was generally good everywhere. 
After the State Fair, many of the fastest horses 
were shipped to the North Pacific Circuit, but some 
were taken south to Fresno, Hanford, and Tulare, 
where some good racing was given for smaller 
purses than had ruled on the main circuit. 

The season, on the whole, was a most successful 
one and furnished pretty conclusive evidence that 
California can take high rank as a harness-racing 
State if the associations giving meetings will only 
announce dates and programs early and arrange a 
circuit that will enable owners to race their horses 
in the classes where they belong. 

It is not too early for the dates for 1908 to be 
claimed and published, and by March 1st every 
association that proposes giving a meeting during 
the year should have its program ready. By unity 
and progressive action, all the best horses and 
most prominent trainers can be induced to remain 
at home this year, and we believe it is the duty of 
our leading associations to make an effort in that 
direction. Let all get together and see if the Cali- 
fornia Circuit of 1908 cannot be made the greatest 
in the history of the State 

o 

Dave McClary has sent two green pacers by Star 
Pointer 1:59%, to Mr. Geers at Memphis. One is 
a full sister to Alice Pointer 2:05%. 



AMERICAN HARNESS HORSES IN DEMAND BY 
FOREIGN OWNERS. 



[J. L. Hervey in Chicago Record Herald.] 

Commenting of the recent New York auction sale 
— whose very remarkable results will afford material 
for discussion for some time to come — it was said 
at a time when the early returns were coming 
in that, while there was an unusually large number 
of foreign buyers in attendance at Madison Square 
Garden, they did not appear to be buying to the 
extent expected. 

This, however, turned out to be a condition which 
was apparent, but not real, due to the fact that 
none of the foreigners made their purchases in their 
own names, but through agents. As a matter of 
fact, they bought more- heavily than for years past, 
and a large number of our best and most highly 
bred trotters are now on their way to the Old World, 
or soon will be. 

Among some of the trotting stallions that go 
abroad are Directum Kelly 2:08%, Lecco 2:09%, 
The Phantom 2:10%, Captain Bacon 2:10% and St. 
Valient Vincent 2:11%. Among the mares are 
Golddust Maid 2:07%, Bi-flora 2:09%, Fanny P. 
2:09% and Directum Lass 2:09%. Among the geld- 
ings are Tom Axworthy 2:07 and Tommy H. 2:07%, 
Along with these there are scores of others, many 
with slower records, or else young and promising 
ones of high breeding but without marks. 

These horses go chiefly to Austria — or Austro- 
Hungary — and to Russia; a few go to France, and 
the two geldings named go to England. The conti- 
nental purchasers invariably buy stallions or mares, 
as geldings are not raced in those countries, and 
such animals as they buy are in many instances 
destined for breeding purposes and not for the turf. 
In Austria, Russia and Italy the breeding of trotters 
is fast assuming extensive proportions, and it is 
also making headway in Denmark, Holland and 
Belgium. France is also interested in it, but she 
refuses to buy American trotting stock for breed- 
ing purposes and sticks to her own breed, as a con- 
sequence of which she is constantly falling behind 
in the procession, her trotters, neither individually 
nor in point of speed comparing with those of 
Austria, Italy or Russia, the three countries where 
American blood has been largely used in improving 
the breed, and is still being used. 

As is well known the oldest breed of trotting 
horses — that is, of distinct type, possessing natural 
trotting action and speed as a part of their family 
inheritance — are the Russian Orloffs, which date 
back to the eighteenth century and had been estab- 
lished long before the Ameircan trotter was so much 
as dreamed of. They were at one time supposed 
to be the best trotters in the world — but the rapid 
evolution of the American has placed them far in 
the back-ground and now, for twenty years past, 
Russia has been importing American blood for the 
purpose of improvement. Its success in this respect 
has been extraordinary. 

About 2:18 is said to be the best rate of speed 
that a pure bred Orloff has attained, but since the 
use of American stallions was begun, the Russian 
trotting record has kept faling at a rapid rate, and 
this past season saw it placed at 2:08%. This per- 
formance was made by the son of an American stal- 
lion and an Orloff mare. 

This method of cross breeding has proved so ex- 
tremely successful that Russian breeders have be- 
gun to discard Orloff sires except for getting car- 
riage stock, as their get have no chance with the get 
of the American sires. But, as Russia's is a strongly 
paternal government, it is the desire to incorporate 
the Orloff strain as a permanent constituent element 
of her racing breed. Hence rules have been passed 
prohibiting the racing of American horses, or horses 
of strictly American blood; all performers must 
have either Orloff sires or Orloff dams. 

As above described, the cross of American sires 
on Oloff mares has been productive of record-break- 
ing results, but there seems reason to doubt if a 
reverse of this cross will be equally successful. 
Howver, the Russians are buying the very best 
mares procurable in America and are breeding or 
will breed them to their native sires. In the past 
two years they have purchased Susie J. 2:06%, An- 
zella 2:06%, and Golddust Maid 2:07%, three of the 
best of latter-day trotting race mares, beside a 
number of others with records of 2:10 or better. 
To the American turfman it seems a pity to see 
such grand mares as these consigned to the harems 
of Orloff stallions. It will, however, be interesting 
to see what they will produce, thus mated. 

It will be observed that the Europeans are very 
partial to fast-record horses. When, something like 
a quarter of a century ago, they first began buying 
trotters here they seldom invested in any of the 
best class, but gradually the tendency has changed 
until now the demand is for the best. The highest 
price, so far as I know, that has been paid by any of 
them is $21,000, paid for that great stallion Onward 
Silver 2:05%, by an Italian connoiseur. 

This does not, of course, take into account the 
purchases of the Winans brothers, Louis and Walter, 
of Brighton. England, for the very good reason that 
they are not foreigners, but Americans resident 
abroad Most of their purchases are made privately, 
the two most recent having been Siliko 2:11% and 
Icon 2:10, which have not been as yet shipped across. 
Siliko is probably the costliest trotter ever sold for 
export. Just what sum was paid for him is not 
authentically known, but it is known that the colt's 
former owner, John E. Madden, repeatedlv refused 
$25,000 for him. 



The Messrs Winans are also liberal buyers of 
pacers, for which there is absolutely no market on 
the continent, and Louis Winans has for several 
years been the owner of the champion pacing geld- 
ing. Prince Alert 1:59%, which he drives on the 
road, there being no opportunity to race him. 

Many of the great trotters that are going abroad 
are of the sort which those who are interested in the 
improvement of our own breed regret to see depart 
owing to their value for breeding purposes. In the 
case of the Messrs. Winans, however, this is not 
always true, as they have returned a number of 
horses to this country after having tried them in 
Europe. Only recently they have sent back several, 
one of which is Susie N. 2:09% at three years, a 
double Futurity winner, that should be of great 
value for a brood mare. 

It is sincerely to be hoi>ed that if Siliko succeeds 
in doing what he has been bought to do — wins the 
European championship at Baden next August — he 
wil eventually be restored to us. 

o 

AMERICAN TROTTERS FOR ENGLISH COACH. 



When coaching men of the Old World come to 
recognize the trotting bred harness horses of 
America as the fastest and stoutest of them all, 
thanks will be due to Alfred G. Vanderbilt more 
than to any other amateur or professional whip for 
having brought the trotter into prominence on 
European roads and show rings, says New York 
Herald. By his purchase last week of eighty picked 
trotters to horse the Venture coach on its daily runs 
between London and Brighton next season, Mr. 
Vanderbilt set on foot a sporting enterprise which 
promises to be of inestimable benefit to American 
horse interests abroad. Other American amateurs 
have put public coaches on the roads in England and 
on the Continent and have demonstrated their skill 
in horsemanship by making some of the fastest 
runs on record, but always with horses of foreign 
breeds. It remained for the owner of the Venture 
to buy his horses here and ship them across the 
Atlantic in order to show English coaching men 
what American trotters can do in heavy harness. 

It was quite a compliment to Fiss. Doerr & Carroll 
that Mr. Vanderbilt should have commissioned them 
to furnish all the fast trotters he is taking abroad 
to represent the native breed of coach horses. The 
order is one of the most important and difficult of 
fulfillment that any dealer has ever received. Ex- 
traordinary speed in addition to other qualities 
which go to make a high class coach horse is de- 
manded of every animal among the eighty to be 
supplied To assemble so many exceptional horses 
of a special type in so short a time as Mr. Vandcr 
bilt has given them to supply the Venture teams is 
an undertaking which few if any dealers in the 
trade could successfully carry out. 

On the day that the contract was closed J. D. 
Carroll telegraphed to James S. Connolly, Willie 
McKinty, A. W. Johnson and half a dozen other ex- 
pert buyers stationed in the West to look out for 
every fast trotter of the right stamp and quality 
for road coaching that came into the markets and 
not. to let the price stop them when they saw the 
right horse. 

"Mr. Vanderbilt intends to break all coaching 
records, and every horse must have plenty of step," 
were the words that went over the wires to Chi- 
cago, Kansas City, East St. Louis, Indianapolis and 
other horse buying centers recently. 

As fast as the horses are assembled, inspected 
and accepted by Mr. Vanderbilt they will be sent 
out to Fiss, Doerr & Carroll's training farm, at 
Teaneck, N. J., to be put in condition for their 
ocean trip early in February. 

o 

STATE FAIR BOARD MEETS. 



At the annual meeting of the Oregon State Board 
of Agriculture held in Salem last week, the following 
officers were elected for the ensuing year: W. F. Mat- 
lock, Pendleton, president; M. D. Wisdom, Portland, 
vice-president: A. Bush, Salem, treasurer; Frank 
Welch, Salem, secretary. 

The report of the retiring officers revealed a profit 
of over $6000 on this year's fair, 'of which about 
$3000 was used in payment of warrants issued 
against the 1906 fair, which were not reported by 
Secretary Durbin in his annual report last year. 
The balance of the money was used in completing 
the stock barns that were built this year, the State 
having appropriated $20,000 for this purpose which 
amount was insufficient to complete them. 

The board decided to build a new grandstand next 
year with a seating capacity of 5000 people. 

The Board declared against selling liquor on the 
ground next year during the fair. 

The two $5000 stakes will be a feature of the 
speed program again in 1908, one for trotters, the 
other for pacers. The classes for these rich stakes 
will be determined by the speed committee at a later 
date. 

W. F. Matlock was elected a delegate to the 
North Pacific Fair Association, which meets in Port- 
land some time in January to fix dates for the vari- 
ous fairs for 1908.— Rural Spirit. 

o 

Direct Hal 2:04%, has been sold three times, 
twice for $10,000 and once for $11,000. 



Tuna 2:08%, and Czarina' Dawson 2:11%, will be 
driven to pole by their owner, Oliver H. Bair, of 
Philadelphia 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



G 



A BREEDERS' BUREAU. 



Capt. Tom Merry Endorses Mr. T. H. Williams' 
Project. 



Los Angeles, Dec. 22, 1907. 
I am told that Mr. T. H. Williams Jr., president 
of the New California Jockey Club, contemplate^ or- 
ganizing a thoroughbred breeding bureau in this 
State, presumably on lines similar to those already 
formulated in New York and Kentucky. If those 
line's are followed, there will be at least one thor- 
oughbred stallion placed in each county of the 
State, for the use of farmers, at a service fee of 
$10 for the season, the money to go to the man 
who takes care of the horse. I see where some 
of the stallions placed by the bureau for public 
service in New York have been allowed to cover 
between eighty and ninety mares in the past sea- 
son. This is all wrong, and will have a deteriorat- 
ing effect upon the horse for next season. That 
no slallion should accept over fifty mares in any 
one season, is the best of my belief; and even that 
limitation is more than excessive where the horse 
is over thirteen or under seven years of age. In 
the season of 1860 the chestnut horse Owen Dale, 
by Belmont, out of Maria Downing by American 
Eclipse, served 104 mares and got eighty-three 
foals, the largest number (within my knowledge) 
ever born in any one season to the cover of one 
stallion. Of these 104 mares Mr. Williamson's book 
made a somewhat curious showing: 



Served once 19 

Served two times 21 

Served three times 17 

Served four times 22 

Served five times or more 25 

Foals from single leaps 13 



His foals for 1861 were mostly large and upstand- 
ing horses like himself, and Clint Melone was as 
fast a horse as ever had been foaled in this State 
up to that time. They kept holding the watch on 
him until they broke him down without ever getting 
him to a race. Copperhead, owned by the ema- 
ciated Jim McCue, was another of his foals in that 
year and could trot in 2:33 to harness, and better 
than 2:37 to a 250-pound wagon. Then the late 
Simon G. Reed started his breading farm, near 
Portland, with Hambletonian Mambrino and Auto- 
crat as his sires. I tried to get him to buy Copper- 
head and use him for a broodmare sire, but he 
could not see it in those lamps. 

Owen Dale's second season was characterized by 
service of eighty-nine mares, and his third one by 
eighty-two, about which time Judge Williamson sold 
him to Joseph W. Johnston of San Jose, who let 
him to seventy-eight mares. At the close of that 
season the game old horse, whose vitality had be- 
come wholly exhausted, died in a pasture lot from 
absolute neglect. I hope no breeder in California 
will allow his horses, or any one of them, to re- 
peat the history of Owen Dale. My own idea of 
the number of mares to be served by any stallion 



is as follows: 

Four years ' 35 

Five years 50 

Six years 60 

Seven to eight years 65 

Nine to ten years 60 

Eleven to twelve years 45 

Thirteen to fourteen years 40 

Fifteen years 35 

Sixteen to seventeen years 25 

Eighteen years and up 25 



If a horse shows himself to be of value as a 
getter of performers, it would be far better to 
limit him to fifty mares from five years old to four- 
teen, in consequence of which his vitality would be 
better preserved. Even better than that would be 
to increase his service fee from year to year and 
decrease in like ratio the number of mares to be 
served. Milton Young has fourteen stallions at 
his farm, near Lexington, Ky., and told me in 1902 
that he never let any of them serve over thirty at 
any age, with a still smaller allowance to Lamp- 
lighter and old Pirate of Penzance. General W. 
H. Jackson of Belle Meade, at whose palatial home 
I was a frequent visitor, told me that his one 
greatest mistake was letting Iroquois serve sixty- 
two mares in 1893, that horse having been premier 
sire of America in the year previous. I am a 
big believer in high fees, and as few services as 
possible where a horse has once established his 
excellence. In Australia their very best race horses 
seldom get a fee in excess of £7 for the first two 
seasons, but if they make good as sires of perform- 
ers, then their services go up to twenty or thirty 
guineas, and often are to be obtained only by 
private contracts, and then only to mares of ap- 
proved conformation and pedigree. In that way 
they husband the breeding powers of a good horse 
and make him valuable in his old age. 

I certainly favor Mr. Williams' project, fully be- 
lieving that it will prove to the general good of 
California breeding interests. If it does not make 
faster trotters and pacers than we have been breed- 
ing (and I deem that exceedingly doubtful), it will 
lead up to a higher class of saddle horses and a 
great degree of quality in our roadsters. William- 
son's Belmont got the only thoroughbred stallion 
(Venture 2:27^), that ever broke into the 2:30 list, 
and it is a far cry from dear old Belmont to any 
stallion now standing for public service in this 
State. I am a believer in thoroughbred blood in 



the harness horse, but I want it not nearer than 
the third generation. Palo Alto, Jay Eye See, 
Alcyone, Alcantara, Allendorf and Lady Thorne 
were all out of thoroughbred mares, registered in 
Bruce's American Stud Book, while Maud S., Nut- 
wood and a dozen others I could name had thorough- 
bred mares for their grandams. But when you come 
to look at the vast number of thoroughbred mares 
that have been mated with trotting sires in the 
hope of getting a 2:10 trotter, the proportion of 
successful matings seems infinitessimally small. 

Another thing to be considered in this matter 
is the chance of getting, occasionally, a handsome 
and useful farm stallion by mating a coarse mare, 
of no determined breeding, with a handsome and 
substantial thoroughbred stallion. Believing that 
it is a poor rule which will not work both ways, I 
will cite an example within my own personal know- 
ledge. 

Col. William Buford of Kentucky was the man 
who went East and purchased the great stallion 
Medoc from John C. Stevens, who was the princi- 
pal backer of Robert Fulton, inventor of the "cross- 
head steam engine. Col. Buford kept Medoc for 
three seasons, at the end of which time he was 
killed in his pasture by the falling of a tree. Medoc 
got a great many female foals, and Buford had 
over a dozen of them. One of these mares never 
could be gotten in foal by any of the thoroughbred 
sires in that neighborhood and the irascible old 
Kentuckian said, finally: 

"By , I'll breed that devilish mare to a jack- 
ass." Before the old gentleman could select a 
"Knight of Malta" to suit him along came a man 
one day with an imported Suffolk Punch horse, 
called Gilbert, a bright red chestnut. Gilbert served 
this mare but once, but that sufficed to bring forth 
a sorrel colt, that, was called John Kerr. This 
horse stood for six or seven years on an Alameda 
circuit, beginning with Haywards and ending up 
at Alamo. He got more high grade farm horses 
than any stallion I ever saw or heard of, and I 
have seen several of his get that were above the 
average as livery horses. If such results could be 
attained by mating a thoroughbred mare with a 
cart sire, why not others as good by breeding 
coarse mares to a thoroughbred stallion? My own 
idea is that the six prerequisites for a stallion to 
be used in a breeding bureau are as follows: 

1. A big body on short legs, avoiding everything 
"weedy." 

- 2. Good back and loins of more consequence than 
excessively large stifles and driving power. 

3. Good hocks, rejecting everything with a ten- 
dency to curb. 

4. A good temper. There are in this world 
enough "bad actors" already. 

5. Nothing over five years old, except such 
horses that have never been trained. Any stallion 
over six years old is liable to have had "the hop" 
thrown into him, to such an extent as to entirely 
destroy his vitality. 

6. A clean and bony head, with intelligent ex- 
pression from the eyes. At the same time keeping 
in mind the axiom that a horse does not run or 
trot with his Lead. 

I hope Mr. Williams will be able to make the 
thing go from the start. I am not sure that I shall 
be in the State after the middle of April, for I 
am seriously considering a flattering offer to re- 
turn to my old home in Oregon. But if I do re- 
main in California from April to November of next 
year, Mr. Williams can have my services, free of 
charge, as secretary of his breeding bureau, if he 
so elects. I am satisfied" that he is actuated solely 
by motives that are for the very best interests of 
California as a breeding State. 

THOS. B. MERRY. 
o 

HOW TO JUDGE HORSES. 



Horses are by all odds the most difficult of all 
classes of stock to judge, and systematic methods of 
work are now essential. This is especially true in 
show ring judging, where there are a large number 
of entries and a limited amount of time. The judge? 
usually has horses moved when they first come out; 
any lameness will easily be noticed. He next has 
them arranged in line and then begins at one end 
and examines them as they come. 

It is well to approach the horses from the front. 
Standing at a reasonable distance, he scrutinizes his 
ge&eral bearing and proportion of parts; also notices 
the straightness of his forelegs and his width of 
chest and spring of rib. He now approaches closer 
and observes the head more carefully; noticing the 
size of the nostrils, and the length of the head, the 
width of the forehead, and the shape, size and 
brightness or clearness of the eyes. He next steps 
back a little and drops down so that he can look 
back between the forelegs at the hocks, and he also 
views them from a position in front, yet a little 
to one side of the fore limbs. From these two po- 
sitions any abnormality of the hock can easily be 
detected, and in making this survey the judge is 
careful to compare one hock with the other. He next 
observes the fore limbs closely, and if he notices 
an enlargement on the inside of the cannon bone, 
he examines it with his hand for splint. He next 
notices the feet at the hoof heads, and in hairy 
legged horses it is always well to examine with the 
hand for sidebone. The foot is also lifted and its 
general shape and texture is observed, as well as the 
size of the frog. 



Having completed the inspection from the front, 
the judge next steps to one side and makes a critical 
examination of the animal, noticing his length of 
neck, chest, carriage of the head, slope of shoulder, 
depth of body, filling of fore flank, shortness of back, 
and shortness and strength of coupling. He also 
notices the letting down of the hind flank, and com- 
pares the length of the upper and lower lines. He 
also observes the length and Ievelness of the croup, 
the set of legs from the side, and the muscling of 
the forearm and gaskins. Next passing to the rear, 
he takes the spring of the rib and general width 
of the barrel; judges width and muscling of the 
crouch, haunch and thighs and raises the tail to 
notice the depth of the muscling in the hind quarters 
between the legs, and also notices the hock at the 
same time. The straightness of the legs is also ob- 
served, and the inspection of form is finished 

The judge now has the horse moved straight away 
from him at a walk. This allows him to observe the 
straightness of movement, and the snap with which 
the horse picks up his feet; and as the horse is led 
back toward the judge the straightness of movement 
is again observed, and the judge than steps to one 
side and allows the horse to pass. As he does so the 
length and balance of stride and the freedom of 
knee and hock action is noted. The horse is moved 
again, this time at the trot, and the same points 
observed as at the walk. Any tendency toward go- 
ing wide behind or to throw the front feet out in the 
manner known as winging, is readily noticed as the 
horse moves straight away; and from the side view, 
overreaching, a short stilted stride, or any tendency 
to drag the limbs is revealed. Besides observing the 
details of action, the judge watches the general car- 
riage, the freedom and buoyancy with which the 
animal moves off. There should be a spring and 
snap to the action that arises from an exhileration 
of spirit, and which reflects the happy poise and 
vigor of the animal. 

Having finished the inspection of the first, he 
should be sent to the other end of the line and the 
inspection of the next taken up in the same manner 
as before. After all have been inspected in this 
manner, and successively sent to the foot of the 
line, the judge has a few picked out for a short leet, 
and makes a more minute examination and compar- 
ison of those he has chosen as likely prize winners, 
until he has definitely decided between them. Good 
judgment, in balancing points is very important just 
here, for many judges are able to see differences 
but go astray in their attempt to estimate the rela- 
tive importance of these differences. 

In actual work in large rings, it is often advisable 
to move all of the horses In such cases the judge 
passes rapidly over the line, picking out those that 
by reason of unsoundness or deficiencies in confor- 
mation are not entitled to be considered . The rest 
he sends to the head of the line and makes a com- 
plete examination of them. This sometimes arouses 
some protest from exhibitors, who hold that every 
horse has a right to be shown in action; but in all 
large rings there are a goodly number that are so 
clearly lacking in top qualifications that it is a 
waste of time to stop to move them. 

In conclusion it should be noted that the most 
successful judges follow some definite method of 
procedure in judging horses, and the plan used by 
some of the best judges has been roughly outlined 
in the sketch. The department of agriculture be- 
lieves that the present tendencies indicate that the 
range stock industry of the future will be confined 
to those regions that are too rough for cultivation 
or too arid for the successful growth of crops. Ex- 
cept in the high mountain regions, where the grazing 
season is very short, or in the desert areas where 
on account of the scarcity of water, grazing can 
be carried on during the winter months, the graz- 
ing will eventually be carried on in enclosed fields 
or on definitely assigned tracts. The stockmen will 
endeavor to get bodies of land large enough to 
support their stock, either by purchase, leasing or 
in case the homestead act should be amended to fit 
range conditions, by homesteading. Many living in 
close proximity to forest reserves will secure per- 
mits allowing them to run stock in these areas 
during the summer seasion. Wherever possible, 
these men will raise enough feed to carry their stock 
safely through the winter season. — Prof. J. W. Ken- 
nedy. 

o 

The officers of Madera county are gradually ac- 
cumulating evidence regarding the wholesale thefts 
of stock from the Miller & Lux ranches. It is 
now apparent that an organized system of horse 
stealing has been going on for more than a year, 
during which time at least 200 animals have been 
taken from the ranches. These horses and mules 
were driven off the pastures by employes of the 
ranches and received by confederates. Then they 
were sold or traded to other confederates or to 
innocent people, being disposed of as rapidly as 
possible. How far the chain of crime exists is for 
the officers to determine. It is known that some of 
those who received some ef the animals got them 
in good faith. But the dividing line between the 
innocent and the guilty is for the officers to prove. 
They are positive that they have evidence to estab- 
lish this in a number of cases. 



Clay Pointer 2:19% is another son of Star Pointer 
1 :59%, to sire a 2: 10 pacer, as his son, Point Burglar, 
took a record of 2:09% in 1907. 

o 

The best hot weather drink is Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



T Saturday, January 4, 1908, 



4. .J. 4. .5. .>*.}. .;. .j. .j, .;. .;. .;. .;. 

! NOTES AND NEWS I 

! ♦ 

♦♦ ♦ »♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ ♦ ♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦< 

An Arizona advertiser wants a trotting bred stal- 
lion. See advertisement. 



Two pacing colts, one by Star Pointer, the other 
by Zonibro, are wanted. See particulars in adver- 
tisement. 



It is said that the Breeders' Association will prob- 
ably hold its stake meeting at Santa Rosa again 
this year. 



The fast pacer Seymow M. 2:23, winner of the two- 
year-old pacing division of the first Breeders' Fu- 
turity, is for sale by J. E. Montgomery of Davis- 
ville. See advertisement. 



There is considerable local talk already about 
the May-day races, which will be held at the Dixon 
half-mile track as usual, this year. Some good colts 
will be "preped" for these races. 



There are some very fine young horses at the 
Woodland Stock Farm for sale, and buyers will do 
well to look them over. Several now on hand can 
step fast and are very handsome. 



Several owners are complaining that they paid 
entrance fees on purses at the Tulare Fair, last 
Summer, that were declared off and the money not 
returned. The National Association is to be asked 
to take the matter up. 



There has been a slight hitch in the matter of 
securing property for the proposed Chico fail- 
grounds and race track, but the outlooK is now good 
for the deal to be completed and a track built in 
time for horses to train on this Spring. 



It is time Marysville came into the circuit again. 
It is quite a horse town and is one of the most 
thriving places in Northern California. There used 
to be great racing on the Northern California Cir- 
cuit, when Chico, Red Bluff, Marysville and Willows 
held agricultural fairs. 



Mrs. Sadie L. Bunch, wife of the well-known 
trainer C. F. Bunch, of Pleasanton, but formerly of 
San Jose, died at Pleasanton on Tuesday, December 
24th. Besides her husband she leaves two sons and 
a daughter, all of whom will have the sympathies 
of a very large number of friends. 



E. D. Waffle of Santa Ana, sends us a photograph 
of his bay filly Zoe by Zombro, dam Leah by Secre- 
tary, that shows her to be a beauty. Zoe is now 
fifteen months old and has been a mile in 2:57 and 
a quarter in 38 % seconds. She is entered in Breed- 
ers Futurity No. 6. 



James Marshall of Dixon, owner of the great 
three-year-old Aerolite (3) 2:11*4, public trial 
2:05%, will probably permit this grand young horse 
to serve a few mares in his four-year-old form. 
Aerolite was bred to a very few mares last spring, 
among them the great mare Bertha, dam of four 
in the 2:10 list, and that other good brood-mare 
Cricket 2:10, dam of six standard performers. With 
such a start he will be a producing sire before he 
is six years old, in all probability. 



William G. Layng, who has been in Philadelphia 
all winter, expects to leave there for California on 
January 5th. Mr Layng, while in Philadelphia, met 
Capt William McCloy, who gave him a letter he 
had received many years before from John Wickham, 
breeder of the thoroughbred mare Fanny Wickham, 
grandam of the great brood-mare Katy G., dam of 
Chas. Derby 2:20, Klatawah 2:05%, etc. Mr. 
Layng thereupon wrote a very interesting 
story about the mare Fanny Wickham, which is 
printed in the Holiday Number of the Chicago 
Horse Review, and which we will re-publish in the 
near future, as it will be, of particular interest to 
those who have any of the Chas. Derby blood on 
their farms. Mr. Layng expects to reach California 
some time in January. 



Pleasanton will be in line again with a good 
harness race meeting this year. The Driving Club 
made a big success of its first meeting last July, 
and better racing was never seen anywhere,' while 
the record of the track was broken twice in the 
first race. President Lee Wells will soon call the 
directors' together to prepare for the big meeting 
of 1908. 



We advise every owner of a mare to send her to 
a good stallion this year. If you cannot afford 
patronizing a high priced horse, pick out the best 
at the price you can afford. Our special stallion 
edition, to be issued February 15th, will contain a 
list of stallions that any State could be proud of. 



Here's a tip. Breed a mare to Kenneth C. 2 : 13 V4 
this year. He is as certain to trot below 2:10 as he 
lives, and he will sire colts that will be fast trotters 
and race horses. When his record is lowered his 
services will doubtless be raised. The time to breed 
your mares to him is now. 



Henry Helman has the only son of Jay Bird in 
California, we believe, and the colt will be in the 
stud this season to a few mares. The Jay Bird strain 
is one of the very best. 



The consignment of eighteen head of trotting bred 
mares and stallions that were shipped from San 
Francisco to Melbourne, Australia, on New-year's 
Day, should lead to other consignments to the same 
country. Australia wants good American trotters 
and pacers at a fair price, the only drawback to a 
big business in this line being the long sea voyage. 



One or two protests have been filed by owners 
who were suspended by Harry Stover for failing 
to pay entrance at his Petaluma meeting last August. 
The next meeting of the Pacific District Board of 
Appeals will be an interesting one, as there are 
several cases to be heard that will be of much int cr- 
est to those who raced on the California Circuit 
of 1907. 



E. Stewart & Co. sold 57 head of "double square" 
brand, small chunks at auction last Saturday. Some 
of the tops brought as high as $135 and the average 
was $75 for the entire consignment. A guarantee 
that these double square horses from the Button 
ranch are good users, is the fact that the San Fran- 
cisco Fire Department has just contracted for a car- 
load and the Police Department for 35 head. 



Beside doing a big business in boarding and liv- 
ery, Wilson & Rooker, of the Van Ness Stables, San 
Francisco, ship a large number of horses, mules and 
cattle to foreign countries. On the Steamer Catherine 
they loaded several head of full-blood Norman mares, 
brought in from Iowa and Illinois, 32 head of Here- 
ford cattle, and 23 head of mules, and on the 
Steamer Enterprise they loaded a nice bunch of 
Hereford bulls, several Kentucky jacks and a lot of 
heavy draft mares, all bound for Hilo, Hawaii. 



"Colonel" Marks and Lewis Charlton will not hav e 
it so easy in heading the list of road riders at Ukiah, 
as Otis Redemeyer with Amazonian (trial 2:15) will 
now have to be reckoned with. This fine, big mare 
was bought by Mr. Redemeyer at Chase's December 
sale, and as she has size and finish, and can brush 
fast any day, or spot in the road, will suit his needs 
exactly and be a nice addition to the many good 
road horses owned about Ukiah. 



The belated report of the Thanksgiving races at 
Red Bluff which reached us gave the race won by 
Leta Dillon, daughter of Herbert Dillon, as a race 
for two-year-olds. Leta Dillon was a yearling when 
she won this race, which was half-mile heats, best 
two-in-three, and her two heats in 1:32% were pretty 
fair for a yearling. She trotted a full mile over the 
same track in 2:51, and her owner states that Her- 
bert Dillon, her sire, is the only horse in Tehama 
county that has sired a yearling to beat three min- 
utes trotting, and that Leta Dillon is his only foal 
of 1906, Herbert Dillon having been bred to but two 
mares the year previous. 



Mr. E. R. Dunn of Seattle, Wash., has been 
spending several days at Pleasanton. During his 
visit there he has put in some of his time behind 
his two colts in training in the stable of Henry Hel- 
man. Having driven the two-year-old by Search- 
light a quarter in 34 seconds at the pace and Rose 
Lecco, a two-year-old filly by Lecco, a full mile in 
2:41 at the trot, he is well pleased with both, and 
has just reason to be. 



Stockton should be on the circuit this year. There 
is no grandstand at the track there, but a temporary 
one could be erected at small expense that would an- 
swer every purpose, and the Stockton people would 
attend in large numbers. 



Zephyz 2:07% by Zombro 2:11 is a producer of 
standard speed, as her daughter, Zelma, has taken 
a record of 2:28% trotting. Zelma is a two-year-old 
and is by Beauseant 2:06%, son of Bow Bells. 



Major P. P. Johnston, president of the National 
Trotting Association, has been appointed adjutant 
general of Kentucky. 



In Australia, where harness horses are handi- 
capped by their showing in races instead of by 
their records, a horse that finishes second in fast 
time is not permitted to start in the slow classes 
thereafter. Thus a horse that starts in the 2:30 
class and finishes three lengths behind the winner 
when the heat is in 2:18 is not counted a 2:30 class 
horse any longer, but must race with 2:20 class 
horses, where he belongs. Such a rule would be 
a good thing in this country, to the writer's way 
of thinking. 



Sir John S. 2:04% will be well patronized this 
year. He is the only unbeaten stallion of 1907 that 
raced on any circuit. If any Pacific Coast association 
will arrange a race for 1908 that will bring together 
Sir John S. 2:04%, Zolock 2:05%, Sherlock Holmes 
2:06%, Copa de Oro 2:07%, Miss Georgie 2:08%, De- 
lilah 2:08, Mona Wilkes 2:06% and two or three 
more of our fastest pacers, it can afford to make 
the purse a big one, as it will draw a tremendous 
crowd, lnferlotta is expected to be attending to 
maternal duties next summer, or she would be 
strictly in such a race with plenty of monev behind 
her at any odds. 



Helena 2:11% by Electioneer has a new standard 
performer to her credit this year in the trotter Or- 
lean 2:27. 



The Park Amateur Driving Club will resume its 
regular matinees at Golden Gate Park in April. 
Until then the weather cannot be depended upon for 
a dry track to race over. 



It has been suggested that a race for four-year-old 
trotters of the 2:30 class, and another for four-year- 
old pacers of the z:25 class might give a number 
of owners who have paid out a lot of stake entry 
fees without geeting much return a chance to race 
their colts again this year without being compelled 
to meet those that outclassed them in 1907. 



Palita (2) 2:16% and Pasonte 2:13, both by Palo 
Alto 2:08%, have new standard performers to their 
credit, the first named being the dam of McCutcheon 
(3) 2:27% and the other dam of Palo Earl 2:30. 



Budd Doble is already beginning to receive letters 
from owners who intend sending their mares to Kin- 
ney Lou 2:07% this season. The colts by this, the 
fastest trotting son of McKinney, are such magnifi- 
cent individuals and show so much natural speed 
that wise breeders desire to own some of this great 
horse's get. Kinney Lou was never in finer shape 
than he is right now. 



Those who arrange programs for the California as- 
sociations this year must remember that meetings 
which are held late cannot give the same classes 
as the early meetings and close them early, as the 
list of starters will be so small late in the season 
that the entrance money collected will only amount 
to a very small proportion of the purse. The 2:20 
pace of the California Circuit of 1907 was on nearly 
every program advertised, and no association offered 
less than $1,000 for it. Entries to all these purses 
closed before the circuit opened, and all received 
large lists. But after lnferlotta and Copa de Oro had 
beaten 2:10 every time they started there were 
several owners who could see no reason why they 
should pay transportation and other expenses all 
the way through when their horses were not fast 
enough to get even fourth money when those two 
whirlwind pacers were sure starters, so they shipped 
home and the fields in the 2:20 class grew "small 
by degrees and beautifully less" until those given 
on the San Joaquin Valley Circuit had to be de- 
clared off. Such a thing should be avoided this year. 

o 

A LIBERAL FUTURITY. 



The American Horse Breeder of Boston, which 
made a great hit with its dollar Futurity last year, 
securing 2480 nominations, a world's record, an- 
nounces another Futurity, its fifth renewal, for foals 
of 1908, on an even more liberal basis. The nomina- 
tion fee will remain, as last year, at $1 a mare, but 
the second, or November payment, has been reduced 
from $10 to $5; with another $5 payment in May 
of the colt's yearling form. This should prove a 
popular move with breeders, and undoubtedly will 
result in a bigger list of entries than was received 
last year. 

The purse is for $10,000, of which $7,000 goes to 
trotters, $5,000 to the winner; $3,000 to pacers, 
$2,000 to the winner, and $700 to nominators of dams 
of winners, and entries close on March 2d. 

This is the fifth renewal of the Futurity. It was 
won in 1907 by the world's champion three-year-old 
trotter, General Watts, in one of the keenest and 
most thrilling contests ever witnessed between 
colts, and the two ehats in 2:09% was the world's 
race record for three-year-old colts at the time it 
was made. 

The Futurities are the very backbone of the har- 
ness horse industry, and this liberally conditioned 
Futurity deserves the hearty support of every 
breeder, big and little, in the country. 

o 

CITATION 2:03'/ 4 . 



The queen of pacers during the past season was 
the unbeaten Citation 2:03%, owned by Judge Marcus 
Cartwright of Chicago and driven by Dick Mc- 
Mahan. Her campaign was, to most people, one of 
the sensations of the year, but to her owner and 
driver it did not come as a great surprise. They 
knew that for two years previous to 1907 Citation 
had been one of the fastest pacers before the public. 
Time after time she had been miles around 2:04 and 
was always a consistent winner. But a strange fa- 
tality seemed to pursue her. She was always 
doomed to meet the best pacers of her class. In 
1905 she was up against The Broncho 2:00%, and 
it was Citation that made that fleet little mare step 
most of her fastest miles that year. In 1906 Cita- 
tion went down the Grand Circuit and met Gratt 
2:02%; Bolivar 2:00%; Ecstatic 2:01%, and others 
of that class. And it was the Chicago mare that was 
the runner-up of the races. Still the only time she 
was ever unplaced in her life was at Readville in 
1906, in the race in which Bolivar 2:00%, and Gratt 
2:02%, lowered the world's record for a three-heat 
race. So while the casual observer who merely 
glances at the form of the various trotters and 
pacers was somewhat astounded by her wonderful 
record of the season just ended, those who were 
intimately acquainted with her past performances 
were not at all surprised. — Horseman. 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THAT SPEECH OF NORMAN J. COLMAN'S. 

This and other papers have given a short tele- 
graphic report of the speech delivered by Hon. Nor- 
man J. Colman of St. Louis at a banquet given mem- 
bers of State Fair Associations, held at Chicago, 
December 5th. The entire speech is so good and 
so apt at this time, when an effort is being made to 
revive fairs and race meetings all over the country, 
that we give it in full from the columns of the 
Rural World: 



Speed Contests at State Fairs. 

At a banquet of representatives of State Fair As- 
sociations convened at Chicago, December 5th, the 
subject of how to make the State Fairs successful 
was discussed, and under the head of "Amuse- 
ments," Hon. Norman J. Colman was unexpectedly 
called upon, to speak, and the stenographic report of 
his speech is as follows: 

Mr. President and Gentlemen: When I sat down 
to the table to-night I felt quite relieved, because 
nobody had said anything to me about having to 
make a talk; I have frequently been drafted into 
making speeches on occasions like this, and when 
I knew that I was going to speak, I ate very little 
of the feast, as I was cudgelling my brain in refer- 
ence to what I should say, and I am up here totally 
unprepared to say anything to you upon the subject 
which has been proposed. 

As to visiting the Pike, Mr. President, I must 
plead guilty. Like all boys of my tender age, I de- 
sire to see all that I can going on in the world. 
(Applause and laughter.) 

But we have not adopted the Pike system in our 
Missouri State Fair. We had it in full blast at the 
great World's Fair at St. Louis, and you had it in 
full blast here at Chicago; and I saw it in full blast 
at Paris, France. But as a rule everything which 
is intended to come under that head, I think would 
prove more detrimental to the fair than beneficial. 
(Applause.) 

We have got to conduct our fairs on a high moral 
plane if we expect to get the support of the people 
of our respective States; and anything which makes 
an unfavorable impression upon our minds or upon 
the minds of our wives, daughter or sons, ought 
to be banished from all State Fairs. (Applause.) 

In reference to amusements, we do have some in- 
nocent amusements in the afternoon, which entertain 
the crowd and which have no detrimental effects. 
But one of the objects that the managers of State 
Fairs have and should have is to draw the people, 
to draw the dollars, the sinews of war, and any- 
thing which can be done, that is honorable and legi- 
timate and attractive and unobjectionable, ought to 
receive the support of the managers of State Fairs. 

Perhaps, unfortunately for myself, I was born a 
great lover of the horse. I believe that there is no 
amusement which draws sp large a concourse of 
people from one's own State and from adjoining 
States, as legitimate harness racing. (Applause.) I 
have had a good deal of experience with fairs. I 
am the oldest fair director, I suppose, there is here. 
I was the father, really, of the St. Louis Fair. I 
sat side by side with the present King of England 
at the table on the St. Louis Fair Grounds, fifty 
years ago, when he was the Prince of Wales, at- 
tended by the Duke of Newcastle, and a number of 
others of the royal family. I witnessed, with ex- 
treme delight, the great attention which he and the 
members of his party paid to the contests of speed 
in that great amphitheater which many of you will 
recall. 

I met with a good deal of opposition as a director 
of that fair, in urging that large purses and prizes 
be offered for horses, for the best horses, that could 
be brought together throughout the United States; 
and it was the attraction and contests those horses 
afforded in a very large degree that made the St. 
Louis Fair one of the most magnificent fairs during 
its existence that the world has ever seen. 

As I heard the advertising talk about the Minnesota 
State Fair , or as it is sometimes called, the Hamline 
Fair, I didn't hear much said about the magnificent 
purses which were offered by that institution, which 
drew together the greatest speed aggregation that 
the world probably has ever witnessed. It is those 
contests of speed that some way or other appeal to 
people, to moral people, to religious people, ministers 
of the Gospel as well; that draw them there. While 
they would not attend a race meeting proper they 
will go to a fair, and when it comes to great con- 
tests of speed, they will witness them. 

My friend N. H. Gentry — I don't see him here — 
now, he is out in "committee meeting," a brother 
director of our State fair, you all know him. He was 
opposed somewhat to the Missouri State fair offering 
such large purses for horses, and taking the brass 
bands out to the grand stand and drawing the 
people there. You know he is the Berkshire king, 
we might say, of America, and he is as much 
wrapped up, nearly, in Shorthorns as he is in Berk- 
shire swine. I had the honor of being president of 
the Missouri State Fair for the first two years of 
its existence. He said to me, "We have got a tent 
from Kansas City to exhibit the cattle in, and I 
can demonstrate to you that cattle will draw as large 
an attendance as horses if you will give me a brass 



band." I said, "You shall have a brass band." He 
had a tent there covering nearly half an acre of 
ground; all the fine cattle were brought in there. 
When the speed contests were taking place out on 
the fair grounds track that vast grand stand was 
filled to its greatest capacity. Along the lines of 
the fences almost to the quarter pole, people were 
there in dense crowds watching with eyes and 
mouths open, the contests of speed. Up the stretch 
nearly to the seven-eighths pole another dense mass 
of people. While this was going on I could hear 
the bass drum boating in the tent; I could hear the 
fine music of the band in that tent, and I concluded 
to go and see whether or not Gentry with his brass 
band is drawing as many people as are to be found 
out here. I went in there, and lo and behold, there 
was Mr. Gentry, there was the band and there was 
the man with his bass drum, and he was beating 
it for all that was in it, and I counted the audience 
and found that there were just forty people inside 
of that great tent viewing the cattle. (Laughter.) 

I went to the Administration Building; I thought 
I would walk up-stairs on the porch, that we have 
there, and see who were present. There I found 
Mrs. Gentry and her daughters and her friends 
watching with the greatest admiration the spirited 
contests of speed. (Laughter) I am sorry Mr. Gentry 
is not here, but I have thrown it up to him many 
times, and he has never asked for a band to com- 
pete against horse racing from that time to this. 

That is an illustration of the drawing power of 
contests of speed, but I don't want to be misunder- 
stood here. I am in favor of bringing to the fair 
the best products of the State, whatever state it 
may be, in every branch of industry. I want to see 
the best cattle and the best horses, the best jacks 
and mules and the best sheep and the best swine, 
the best fruit; the best products of our fields and 
orchards and gardens and vineyards. I want them 
brought there and exhibited to the people, but they 
frequently will not attend unless there are other 
attractions. And if the state fairs had only them to 
show they could not have, in my estimation, one-half 
of the attendance that they do have if they give 
large prizes for contests of speed for the best horses 
—we have had constant demonstrations of this. 

There is another thing in reference to it. There 
is a very consoling reflection when managers of 
fairs offer large purses for contests of speed. They 
contest not for the state fair money, but for their 
own money, and the entry fees paid by them fre- 
quently exceed the purses by large amounts. Where 
you have sixteen entries — and many times you have 
twenty, thirty, forty or fifty of those entries, they 
will pay the complete purse, it doesn't make any 
difference whether it is $10,000 r $5,000, or $500, or 
whatever it may be; for every man before he can 
enter his horse has to pay his 5 per cent entry upon 
his horse to get him in, and the winners have to pay 
5 per cent additional, which for the four winning 
horses makes 40 per cent. So that these races in 
nine cases out of ten at the state fairs cost the fair 
not a farthing, but add considerable money to the 
fair's receipts, for the poor horsemen have to con- 
tribute their own money and race for it. So you 
need not be afraid of offering these large premiums. 
It is this plan which has made the Illinois State Fair 
so successful. It is this which has made the Hamline 
Fair so successful. It is this which has helped out 
the Indiana Fair; the Missouri State Fair and every 
state fair that has offered large premiums for speed. 

So if you want amusements encourage the breeding 
of horses; they will draw the people. God has so 
made man that he loves to see contestsT I don't 
care what they are; if it is a dog fight he will stop 
to see it. (Laughter.) . If it is a fight between two 
boys, he will stop to see it — and so with every con- 
test whatever it may be. We all have an innate 
love for the horse. Why, our first President, the 
father of our country, was the greatest admirer of 
a horse, the race horse. Jefferson and Monroe and 
Jackson, not only owned them, but raced them. The 
love of a fine or fleet horse is implanted in man's 
breast so deep that it cannot be wiped out. You 
want to use every magnet that you legitimately can 
to draw people to your fairs in order that you may 
get money for other purposes — to pay premiums in 
other directions. I don't want to be misunderstood; 
I am entirely opposed to the pool selling system. 
(Applause.) I am opposed to gambling on the track 
or anywhere else. It should not be allowed on any 
fair grounds. (Applause.) We must have clean 
racing, legitimate racing for the money which is 
put up, and not help along gambling; and I think 
at none of our state fairs is this gambling system 
allowed. It is not allowed in some of the eastern 
states and many of them are doing better than if 
the pool system prevailed. 

We want everything clean and pure about the state 
fair. It is a great educational institution. A young 
man's education is not complete now in the college. 
He wants to see what his State can produce; he 
wants to know something about its great resources, 
agriculturally, horticulturally, in dairy matters, in 
the breeds of live stock and methods which have 
produced them, and who is offering the best. The 
people will come and see them. Hut after they 
have been around in the morning, seeing all of these 
magnificent productions of your state, in the after- 
noon give them some dessert, some entertainment, 
some amusement; give them clean, fine racing, and 
they will enjoy that, and it will be a magnet which 
will draw more people to your state fair than any 
other amusement, and it generally costs you nothing. 
(Applause.) 



PRACTICAL TRAINER'S ADVICE. 



A. J. Feek has the following to offer on the cooling 
out of horses on his book, "Every Man His Own 
Trainer": 

"Watch your horse closely in the process of cool- 
ing out between heats. 1 have never yet had a 
groom so good that I thought it would do any harm 
to watch him while cooling out his horse, and I 
believe I have had as good men as were ever in the 
business. I always thought that I could form a 
better opinion as to how my horse was going to 
trot the next heat if I could see him cooled out, as 
many times the men working about the horse are 
thoroughly heated up themselves and are not com- 
petent to judge of the weather; the day might be 
cool, but they would think it warm, and when start- 
ing to walk the horse they would not put covers 
enough on him; and again they might put on too 
much which would be just as injurious to the horse; 
and, as I said before, it is no harm to look after 
them, and I always feel this a duty and just as ne- 
cessary as to drive the heat. I might not have oc- 
casion to dictate in cooling out a dozen horses, and 
again might with one word of advice win the race, 
as often two heads are better than one; as no one 
is perfect; we are liable to err or forget some im- 
portant point. I have had some horses that in warm 
weather would, in cooling out, dry all up if a heavy 
wrapper was thrown over them, and would puff and 
blow and seem to be distressed when if the heavy 
blanket were replaced with a light lindsey and 
walked about they would break out and sweat nicely 
and quit blowing and when the bell rang they were 
ready to go out and go another heat. If the day is 
hot and dry, see that the soles of the feet are 
bathed in cold water after each heat. I have seen 
grooms wet down a strip of grass alongside of the 
walking ring, leading the animal over the strip each 
time. I have seen horses throw shoes after going 
the better part of a fast mile, and, on picking it up, 
found it so hot I could not hold it in my hand. This 
taught me that it was as necessary to bathe the feet 
as it is the head. 

"If you are trying to get the money with one of 
the sort that is inclined to become sore-toed after 
its race, there is an old-fashioned remedy that might 
be tried with good results. Remove the shoes so 
as to rest the feet as much as possible, and put on 
the poultices, viz.: Two quarts of wheat bran; scald- 
ing thoroughly, place it in a couple of rubbags; take 
three or four common raw onions for each foot; 
after pounding them to a pulp, place them over the 
bran and place the horse's foot in the center of the 
poultice, bring up the corners of the rub-cloths and 
tie them about the ankle and leave them on till 
morning. When they are taken off it will be found 
that there is no soreness nor fever in the feet, and 
aside from a walk in the early morning dew, it will 
be as well to let him alone to rest out as to 
hitch and jog him. If a paddock is handy and the 
animal has been used to being turned out at home 
the relaxation and good he will get from such treat- 
ment will be inestimable in many cases. There are 
a lot of horses that want to be let alone after they 
have had a hard race, and if fussed with and pot- 
tered around will become nervous and thin as wood. 
Some horses will rest out in one day, while others 
do not recuperate so quickly and require three or 
four days. This latter sort should not be asked to 
race twice a week, and it is questionable if any of 
them should be raced more than once. 

o 

A LESSON FOR DRIVERS TO FOLLOW. 



Have you ever noticed that a silent man usually 
has the best broken horses? Drive with him and it 
will be a matter of wonder how he manages his 
horses with no management visible, where the horse 
goes where he is wanted without apparent effort on 
the part of the driver. 

Ed. Geers, the famous turfman, is known as the 
"silent man," who has been noted for his success 
in the art of driving a horse to his utmost limit of 
speed without speaking a word or making an effort 
while his rivals were whooping and yelling and 
whipping and coming out generally behind. 

Probably there is a lesson in this. The average 
horse understands only a few words, signs or com- 
mands. The silent man gives only a few and he does 
not confuse his horse. The horse is made to know 
them thoroughly, he understands the man who un- 
derstands aim. It is a pleasure to drive a horse 
that understands — few pleasures in life can equal 
it if the horse is a good, cheerful driver. There 
would be more of this kind if they were made to 
know a few things thoroughly — the right things. 
The great difficulty is that many horses have more 
sense than their drivers. — Stock Farm. 

o 

CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB STAK ES — $25,000. 



This event received seventy-six entries for 1907 
and a field of eleven went to the post. This stake 
bids fair to be one of the most popular stakes in 
the United States, on account of the very reason- 
able amount ($i!. r >) which is required to make a horse 
eligible, and it is expected that this year's entry list 
will exceed last. The conditions of the stake are 
advertised in this paper and entry blanks will be 
forwarded on application to the Coney Island Jockey 
Club, Windsor Arcade, New York, or to the 
Breeder and Sportsman, 61G Golden Gate Ave., San 
Francisco. 



I 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908. 



i 



i .*. ROD, GUN AND KENNEL :. ! 

9 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT | 



INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION'S ANNUAL MEET- 
ING. 



The annual meeting of the stock-holders of the 
Interstate Association was held at Oakland, Bergen 
County, N. J., December 5, 1907, at 10 A. M. The 
meeting was duly adjourned to meet December 6, 
1907, at 10.30 A. M., at room 1609, 140 Cedar street, 
New York City. The adjourned meeting was called 
to order at 10.30 A. M., with President Haskell in the 
chair. 

The roll-call showed the following members 
present: Union Metallic Cartridge Company, by A. 
C. Barrell ; Winchester Repeating Arms 'Co., by S. 
G. Lewis; Parker Brothers, by W. F. Parker; E. 1. 
duPont deN'emours Powder Company, by J. T. 
Skelly; Laflin & Rand Powder Company, by J. A. 
Haskell; Remington Arms Company, by E. E. 
Drake; Marlin Fire Arms Company, by J. Howard 
Marlin; Hunter Arms Co., by John Hunter; Peters 
Cartridge Company, by T. H. Keller; Chamberlain 
Cartridge and Target Company, by A. H. Durston; 
American Powder Mills, by Murray Ballou; Dickey 
Bird Target and Trap Company, by G. H. Tefft, and 
the A. H. Fox Gun Company, by A. H. Fox. The 
United Lead Company was represented by S. G. 
Lewis, by proxy, and the Austin Cartridge Company, 
by J. T. Skelly, by proxy. J. W. Heirs, of the 
"Sportsman," H. S. Rosenthal and L Werk, of the 
"Sportsmen's Review," and A. W. Higgins, honorary 
members of the Association, were also present, as 
was Elmer E. Shaner, Secretary-Manager of the 
Association. L. C. Parker, of Parker Brothers, was 
present by invitation. 

The minutes of the different meetings held during 
the year, and those of the mail votes taken, were 
read and approved. 

Mr A. C. Barrell, Treasurer, presented his report 
for the year. The report was received, approved and 
filed. The Secretary-Manager's report was also re- 
ceived, approved and filed. 

The resignation of the Latin & Rand Powder Com- 
panpany was presented", and on motion accepted. 

The following matters were next taken up and 
approved by the Association: 

Registered Tournaments.. On and after February 
1, 1908, clubs may hold tournaments under theaus- 
pices of the Interstate Association which will be 
known as Registered Tournaments. To secure 
recognition for a Registered Tournament from the 
Interstate Association it is first necessary for the 
Secretary or other authorized officer of the club to 
comply with the following conditions: 

1 — To make application to the Secretary-Manager 
not less than 45 days in advance of the tournament 
opening date, upon blanks furnished by the Inter- 
state Association. 

2 — To state to the Secretary-Manager the name of 
the club, the name of the manager or names of the 
managers, and to state also for what purpose the 
tournament is to be given. 

3 — To state the amount of money to be added, if 
any, how it is to be applied, and the syscem of 
money division. 

4 — To place a printed program of the tournament 
in the hands of the Secretary-Manager at least 15 
days before the date or dates of said tournament. 

5 — To state what hotel accommodations and rates 
shall be accorded shooters. 

6 — To agree that the secretary, or other 
authorized officer of the recognized club, shall mail 
promptly to the Secretary-Manager of the Interstate 
Association at the close of the tournament a report 
duly signed by said secretary or other officer, show- 
ing specifically the names and addresses of con- 
testants, number of targets shot at, and scores made 
by each contestant, one event with another. The 
scores of amateurs and professionals are to be given 
under separate heads accordingly. This report is ta 
be made out on suitable blanks furnished by the 
Interstate Association If a club defaults on this 
agreement in any particular, permission for further 
registered tournaments will not be granted. 

7 — After compliance with the foregoing conditions, 
the application will forthwith be submitted by the 
Secretary-Manager to each member of the tourna- 
ment committee for a mail vote, and upon receipt 
of a favorable reply from a majority of the mem- 
bers of the committee, the Secretary-Manager will 
register the tournament and immediately notify all 
members of the Interstate Association. If the ma- 
jority of the committee is unfavorable, registration 
will not be allowed. Clubs which are registered 
with the Interstate Association will receive favor- 
able discrimination in advertising matters as against 
unregistered clubs. 

Season's Average. The season's average for both 
amateurs and professionals shall be computed on not 
less than 2,000 single targets for amateurs, and not 
less than 5,000 single targets for professionals, shot 
during each calendar year respectively (1908 ex- 
cepted, in which year January will not be consid- 
ered)) rrom the standard distance fixed by the In- 
terstate Association (the distance at this time being 
16 yards) and only in Interstate or registered tourn- 
aments, and the records of said tournaments shall 



be compiled in detail by or under the supervision of 
the Interstate Association's Secretary-Manager, 
whose duty it shall be to 

1 — Report every contestant's name, address and 
score in all Interstate Association and registered 
tournaments, these reports to mention amateurs and 
professionals under a separate heading. 

2 — To keep a permanent record of amateurs' and 
professionals' averages made at Interstate Associ- 
ation and registered tournaments; this record to be 
considered the official average guide for the year. 

Important. It shall not be obligatory for a contest- 
ant to shoot in all events called for by the program 
of a tournament to have score count as an average 
record, and every event a contestant takes part in 
at an Interstate Association or registered tourna- 
ment shall count as a record for season's average. 
If a contestant of his own accord withdraws from an 
event, after starting in it, and does not shoot at 
the total number of targets called for by the event, 
the targets not shot at shall be scored as "lost tar- 
gets." 

Defining an Amateur. When a shooter's standing 
is officially questioned by written protest to the In- 
terstate Association, or in case official exception is 
is taken to any one having signed the Interstate 
Association's amateur aertificate, challenging the 
correctness of said certificate, it shall be the duty 
of the Secretary-Manager to take up with manufac- 
turers whose goods are being used the verification 
of the representations contained therein, and each 
member of the Association must thereupon reply ful- 
ly and freely regarding all transactions involved. 
This to be effective January 1st, 1908, and not to be 
retroactive. 

The Interstate Association ruled that after Janu- 
ary 1st, 1908. a professional will need to be one year 
out of professionalism, isstead of three months as 
per ruling heretofore, before the Association rec- 
ognizes him as an amateur. 

New Business. Under the head of New Business 
the Association ruled that in future Grand American 
Handicap tournaments all ladies in the employ of 
the members of the Interstate Association are eligi- 
ble to competition. 

The Association, in the stress of pressing business, 
did not forget the good services of the sportsmen's 
journals, honorary members of the Interstate Associ- 
ation, in respect to the generous space accorded in 
the way of preliminary notices and tournament re- 
ports, and passed a resolution of thanks according- 
ly. Also the Association passed a resolution thank- 
ing the officers and members of the clubs under 
whose auspices the Interstate Association tourna- 
ments were held. The Publicity Bureau of the Asso- 
ciation also received a vote of thanks for its effcient 
work during the year. A vote of thanks was tend- 
ered President Haskell for the use of his office and 
for the bountiful luncheon provided. 

The following resolution was adpted: 

"That in each tournament given by the Interstate 
Association there shall be one event in which the 
contestants shall have the use' of two shots at one 
target 19 yards rise, and another event at doubles 
16 yards rise, and that the scores made in these 
events shall constitute a part of the official score 
record." 

Handicaps for 1908. The places of handicaps for 
1908 are as follows: Grand American Handicap, 
Columbus, O. ; Southern Handicap, Birmingham, 
Ala., Western Handicap, Des Moines, la., and the 
Rocky Mountain Handicap, at Denver, Colo. It was 
decided to hold no Pacific Coast Handicap this year, 
and the matter of the Eastern Handicap was held 
in abeyance for further consideration. 

It was ruled that the Tournament Committee as a 
body, in connection with the Secretary-Manager, 
shall adjudicate upon all complaints made at tourna- 
ments given by the Association, notice to this effect 
to be printed in the programs of the tournaments. 

The following Board of Directors were elected to 

serve during the ensuing year: T. H. Keller, A. C. 

Barrell, W. F. Parker, S. G. Lewis, J. T. Skelly, A. 
H. Durston, and .1 Howard Marlin 

The Board of Directors elected officers as follows: 
President, W. F. Parker; Vice-President, T. H. 
Keller; Treasurer, A. C. Barrell; Secretary-Manager, 
Elmer E. Shaner. 

The Directors appointed the following committee: 
Tournament Committee — Paul North, chairman, S. 
G. Lewis. A. C. Barrell, T. H. Keller, J. T Skelly, A. 
H . Durston and H. McMurchy. Handicap Com- 
mittee — C. H. Newcomb, chairman, Geo. L. Lyon,. 
Geo. L. Carter, H. R. Bonser and Geo. K. Mackie. 
Trophy Committee — A. W. Higgins, chairman, and 
Edward S. Lentilhon. 

After discussing several matters of no particular 
interest to the general public, the meeting ad- 
journed sine die at 6.10 P. M., with all business fully 
covered. 

ELMER E. SHANER, Secretary-Manager. 



Report of Secretary-Manager. 

Pittsburg, Pa., November 23, 1907. 
To the President, Officers and Members of the Inter- 
state Association: 

It is unnecessary to say that the season was a 
success. The attendance at the tournaments and 
the results accomplished show for themselves that 
there are no signs that the sere and yellow tinge is 
impending. I take occasion to again say that interest 
will continue to accumulate just so long as the 
sport is controlled on the present equitable lines. 
The guidance and influence of such an organization 
as the Interstate Association are imperatively, not 
to say absolutely, necessary to keep the sport at 
its present high standard. 

The tournament work for the season is sum- 
marized as follows: 

The Southern Handicap. The second Southern 
Handicap Tournament was held at Richmond, Va., 
May 8, 9 and 10, under the auspices of the Deep 
Run Hunt Club. For four days previous to the 
tournament it rained every day and at times heavi- 
ly. 

The handicaps were unusually favorably received. 
Chairman Elmer E. Shaner and B. Waters were the 
only members of the official committee present, but 
Messrs. Miles Taylor, of Washington, D. C, Geo. 
L. Lyon, of Durham, N. C, and W. M. Foord, of 
Wilmington, Del., were appolnved to fill the vacancies 
and wisdom was justified in the choice. 

Specially distinguishable were the geniality and 
urbanity of the contestants and the gracious hos- 
pitality bestowed on visitors by the sportsmen of 
Richmond, and it was fully appreciated. 

The Grand American Handicap. What has been 
pronounced by unprejudiced outsiders the grandest 
trap shooting tournament ever given was held on the 
grounds of the Chicago Gun Club, Chicago, June 18, 

19, 20 and 21. The entries in the principal event 
numbered 496, while each event from start to finish 
had an enormous entry list. This was the greatest 
entry list in the history of the sport and for success 
of the tournament the Chicago Gun Club from top 
to high private in the rear rank are entitled to 
equal praise, as all did their duty according to lo- 
cation. 

Trophies were well distributed, a consummation 
to be desired, as it gives encouragement to a worthy 
class of contestants who would otherwise become 
discouraged if a certain class of men were year after 
year to rake down the principal events. 

The organization as to departments and detail 
were complete from start to finish, the" shooting was 
without a hitch. Our Association which for fifteen 
years has been in the van never accomplished a 
better stroke of business than during these four 
days, and that is saying much in view of its decade 
and one-half of strenuous effort in this direction. 

The Eastern Handicap. The second Eastern 
Handicap Tournament was held unter the wing of 
the Association of Palefaces, at Boston, Mass., July 
16, 17 and 18, and it was a notable event in every 
sense. The entries were sufficiently numerous for 
comfortable handling and matters moved as smooth- 
ly as at a boss-managed political convention. The 
grounds are in A No. 1 class. They are at Welling- 
ton, Mass., a few minutes' ride from Boston. 

Messrs. C. M. Powers and W. D. Townsend, mem- 
bers of the committee appointed by the Association 
to allot handicaps, were unable to be present at this 
tournament and their places were filled by Mr. 
Frank M. Eames, of Philadelphia, and Mr. O. R. 
Dickey, of Wellington, Mass. The work of the com- 
mittee seemed to give the best of satisfaction, as 
few, very few, complaints were heard. 

The Western Handicap.. The second Western 
Handicap Tournament, held at Denver, Colo., August 

20, 21 and 22, under the auspices of the Denver Trap 
Club, testified to the abilities of the live Westerners 
to make an event interesting. Co-operation with the 
authorities at Denver, the officers of the Denver 
Trap Club had the shooting grounds in first-class 
shape for the tournament. The traps were located 
as a year ago at Berkeley Lake, five miles from the 
center of Denver, and nothing could be. asked for 
except better weather. This was as fickle as a 16- 
year-old girl. 

Dr. C. E. Cook, of New London, Iowa, and Mr. 
Geo. K. Mackie, of Scammon, Kansas, filled the 
places of Messrs. Waters and Gleason on the Handi- 
cap Committee. The work of the Committee was 
well received by the contestants. 

The Pacific Coast Handicap. The third Pacific 
Coast Handicap Tournament was held at Spokane, 
Wash., September 10, 11 and 12, under the auspices 
of the Spokane Rod and Gun Club. The Spokane 
Club spent considerable money in preparing the 
ground for the event. The grounds form a natural 
amphitheatre. The high bluff background was some- 
thing of a puzzle to strangers, but on the whole they 
succeeded in doing fairly good work. The civic 
authorities interested themselves in the event and 
contributed to its success. 

The attendance fell far below expectations and 
various reasons were given for this such as a late 
harvest, the beginning of the open season for game 
shooting and inability to secure reduced railroad 
rate. Personally I am inclined to think that it was 
due to the stiff proposition offered in the shooting 
grounds of the Spokane Club. 

The handicapping committee, composed of Chair- 
man E. E. Shaner, C. M. Powers, Fred K. McBroom, 
of Spokane, Wash., Dr. A. P. Purdy, of Seattle, 
Wash., and J. F. Smails, of Walla Walla, Wash., 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



cannot be blamed for low scores. 

The Outlook. Relative to the future there is very 
little to say except to repeat what has been said 
over and over from year to year in the past. The 
Interstate Association continues to be to trap 
shooting what base-ball leagues are in the game of 
base-ball, keeping alive interest in the sport and 
keeping the interest unflagging among local clubs 
which have become as thick as stars in the sky. 
This interest is especially noticeable in the vicinities 
where sportsmen's journals circulate. Thus mem- 
bership keeps pace with growth of population which 
is all that the most optimistic can ask. 

The 1907 Handicap Committee. As Chairman of 
the Handicap Committee I feel a delicacy in taking 
a part in the discussion sprung on its management 
the past season, but as Secrtary-Manager of the 
Vssociation I feel It obligatory to record my views. 

The Handicap Committee of 1907 was undoubtedly 
one of the best and most competent committees 
ever appointed for the work; it was fully in touch 
with trap shooters in general and abundantly quali- 
fied to appreciate individual merit. I am not biased 
in my views by the fact that I was chairman of the 
committee, but I cannot refrain from saying that the 
committee in alloting handicaps was unswayed by 
personal feeling, and uninfluenced by any consider- 
ation save that of merit. The results tell their own 
story, and the records show that the committee's 
arduous and not altogether pleasant task was well 
and faithfully done at each and every tournament. 

In dismissing the subject it is pertinent to remark 
that if a handicap committee is to be bound by hard 
and fast rules it ceases to be such committee and 
becomes a superfluity. It may also be pertinent to 
state that if handicaps are so arranged that profes- 
sionals stand but little chance of winning, there is a 
wide-spread feeling that it would be more honorable 
to bar them altogether. But I think all has been 
said that honor demands and it is necessary to cast 
a glance at other features. 

Next Year's Grand American. The Grand American 
Handicap Tournament is recognized as the event of 
the year and the greatest care should be exercised 
in its management. The place to be selected for 
holding it should be carefully considered. We have 
applications from Columbus, St. Louis, Indianapolis 
and Chicago. A general discussion may be of vital 
importance. At the same time the very best of 
everything should be provided. On these much of 
our past success has hinged. 

It will be conceded by all that the Grand Amer- 
ican Handicap cannot continue to grow indefinitely. 
It must in the nature of things reaching limit. In 
fact, if that limit has not already been reached, it 
will tax human ingenuity to conceive a means to 
extend it satisfactorily. Lookers-on in the excite- 
ment of a contest may regard the management as 
simple, but they fail to consider the magnitude of 
preparation which is the ground work of success. 
Only those in immediate contact with the work 
know of its nerve-racking intensity. The detail, 
which is immense in amount and complexity, must 
be mastered and laboriously worked out prior to 
the actual time for holding the tournament. When 
all has been accomplished the final engagement may 
seem simple enough to those who do not under- 
stand that the greater part of the work is not visible. 

While not wishing to appear as dictatorial, I 
think the Great American Handicap has reached 
that point where it cannot be the ambition of any to 
make it the largest, but the best in existence. 

In Conclusion. I deem it but just to repeat what 
what I have so frequently said regarding the obliga- 
tions under which our Association rests to the sports- 
men's journals. They have satisfied the demands of 
the most exacting in reporting our tournaments 
and in publishing matters of general and particular 
interest to our subscribers, keeping the work well 
before the public. As honorary members of the 
Association they are entitled to unstinted praise 
for their efficiency and courtesy. I wish to renew 
my expression of obligation for the many unsolicited 
marks of appreciation they have bestowed upon me 
personally. 

I cannot close without a renewal of my thanks 
to our subscribers for the urbanity with which 
they have treated me in all our relations, public and 
private, and in this connection I wish to include 
the members of the various committees whose aid, 
advice and getlemanly treatment I appreciate at 
full value. Very respectfully submitted, 

ELMER E. SHANER, Secretary-Manager. 

o 

CONVENTION OF OREGON SPORTSMEN. 



Unless the plans of many Portland sportsmen 
miscarry, that city, sometime dining themonth of 
February, will be the meeting place of all the prom- 
inent lovers of the rod and gun from every point in 
the State of Oregon. This big gathering is being 
called by the sportsmen of Portland for the purpose 
of discussing the present game laws and of planning 
the kind of legislation that will take out of the 
hands of politicians the framing of Oregon's game 
laws. 

It is the boast of sportsmen that no state In the 
Union furnishes so many kinds of shooting and fish- 
ing as can be found in the State of Oregon and in 
order to keep it so, and to add to the uplands more 
game birds, and to give them the proper protection, 
both in and out of season, will be the purposes of 
this meeting. It has been estimated by men who 
are sportsmen and not merely hunters, that with 
properly framed game laws and with the money 



that is poured into the State Treasury from hunters' 
license fees, and to this the money paid for dog 
licenses, the state would have at its disposal for the 
protection of game and for prosecution of those who 
violate the laws, something like $50,000, It is the 
purpose of the men who have called this gathering 
to take the kinks out of the present thing that is 
called Oregon's game law and frame one that will 
be worthy of the name. 

The movement looking forward to this meeting 
of sportsmen was started some time ago. Mr. Lip- 
man has written to some of the best-known sports- 
men throughout the state and he has received replies 
favoring the movement and, promises to be on hand 
when the present hunting season closes. Local 
sportsmen will defray the expenses of the meeting 
and when the date has been set a hall will be 
rented. Under the present lack of game laws, it 
would not be many years before deer, elk, Chinese 
pheasants and other game birds will be a thing of 
the past and the trout streams barren. The game 
hog, of course, will howl at such legislation, but, as 
he is in the minority, his howl will not count for 
much. 

When it is considered that there are in Portland 
alone something like 3,000 shooters who during the 
season for upland birds, tramp over field and hills 
and spend their Sundays in the duck-blinds and 
spend annually almost $100,000, some idea can be 
gained as to what it costs each man a year for his 
sport. And when you, who have no liking for a gun 
or a fishing rod, or would enjoy the sport if you 
had a place to shoot, are enjoying a duck dinner, the 
remembrance of some friend, just also remember 
that each bird that is on the table before you cost 
the man who tramped over the fields, or stood in the 
chilly drizzling rain in a duck-blind, and paid his 
expenses in good, hard coin of the realm, all the 
way from 80 cents to $1. 

Taking the big duck-shooting preserves and the 
little ones that are dotted along the sloughs of the 
Willamette and the Columbia rivers from Portland 
almost down to Astoria, there are perhaps 150 clubs. 
Almost every one of them is rented from the farmers, 
and in many instances it is necessary for ihe 
sportsmen to build their own cabins, and always they 
must furnish their own bedding and meals This is 
the first cost. Then comes the salary of the keeper. 
The biggest item of expense is the feeding of wheat, 
which costs all the way from $30 to $32 a ton. Soni'.> 
of the big clubs feed as much as a 'ton of wheat a 
month. Take such clubs as the Deer Tsland, the 
Black Jack, the Honeyman Club, the H. & R. Club, 
the Dead Willow, those who shoot at the Adams 
farm and several other clubs, feed on an average 
a ton of wheat a month throughout the sixteen weeks 
of the duck-shooting season. Fifty of the clubs will 
feed on an average of half a ton a week and per- 
haps 100 other clubs will feed a quarter of a ton 
a week. Just figure the wheat at $30.00 a ton and 
see what amazing figures you will have. After 
you have done this, figure that each hunter will 
shoot 250 shells a week. 

Shells cost about $15 a case and there are 500 in 
a case. This also runs into the thousands. Having 
reached this stage, just figure the cost of railroad 
and boat transportation and the food bought, and 
before you are through you will see for yourself 
that the sportsmen spend $100,000 a year. 

Yet this fortune is freely and happily spent, for 
there is not a man among them that does not enjoy 
his weekly holiday to the utmost. The ma- 
jority of them are all "hail fellows well met." With 
a day in the duck blinds, -the business cares of the 
week and the financial depression are forgotten as 
completely as the Winter snows of long ago. Once 
in their shooting togs and on board the boat or train, 
all things that worry are left behind not to be taken 
up until Monday rolls around. Bankers, lawyers, 
doctors, business men and the day laborer or office 
clerk meet on a common level and the talk runs 
to stories of ihe field or blinds. Take any one of 
the boats that leave down the river on Saturday 
afternoon or night and you will find your banker, 
or your lawyer, or your doctor, dressed in his shoot- 
ing clothes, laden with bundles and with gun and 
dog. The greetings are whole-souled, for they come 
from the throats of men through whose veins course 
the red corpuscles. 

There is an old saying which runs, "A man on 
a horse is twice a man." If he is, a man with a gun, 
a place to shoot and a good dog, and merry com- 
panions is indeed a king. 

It is a trip worth a lifetime. They say you don't 
know a man until you have lived with him. Maybe 
not, but spend a day at his side shooting with him 
and you know him forever and a day. If he has 
any oats in him they will stand out like Mount Hood 
on a clear, sunlight day. There are some men who 
go shooting out of Portland who are not fit for 
association, but take them as a whole and they 
are the best fellows on earth. It is the love of the 
spoil, his love for his dog and gun that makes him 
a man among his fellows. 

It is a treat worth while and something that adds 
years to life, to spend the night as a guest at almost 
any of the clubs. Once inside the cabin. After the 
meal has been eaten and smoking is in order, just 
get one of the old-timers to talking. Hear the 
stories told of the patriarch who hunted in the long 
ago when Portland was in its swadling clothes. 
Get Frank Thorn, the dean of the duck-shooting 
brigade, and unquestionably one of the best wing 
shots in all Oregon, to tell of duck preserves and 
before the law said you may kill 50 ducks and no 



more. To hear him tell of the times when such men 
as Sim Reed, Judge Whalley, Jack Holman, H. 
Green and others who have passed to their final 
reward, used to shoot their ducks, Is a rare treat. 
Thorn has been shooting ducks along the two 
rivers for 35 years. He is a student of the game 
and no one knows more about the habits of ducks 
and other wild fowl than he. Thirty-five years with 
gun and dog; just think of it! It's just a glorious 
record, that's all. Thorn is as keen an observer of 
men as he is of the birds of the field and water and 
in those thirty-five years he has witnessed the seri- 
ous and humorous sides of the hunting game. He is 
a splendid story teller and they are the clean yarns 
of the hunting cabin, scores of hunting feats and 
funny things that happened in a day's hunt. 

Thorn has shot on almost every duck lake Oil the 
two rivers. He can tell you when the flight of the 
sprig is due; when the mallards will come, and as 
far as he can see a bird in the air he can tell you 
whether it is sprig, widgeon, mallard or canvasback. 

o 

CARIBOU SHOOTING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



G. C. Cowan contributes to Rod and Gun in 
Canada the following interesting article on "Caribou 
Shooting in British Columbia.": 

As the last glow of the sun faded away in 
a British Columbia sky, E., his guide, myself, and 
our Chinese cook, dismounted from our horses, un- 
loaded the pack ponies, and pitched camp. We did 
this well in the centre of some small pines, a shelter 
particularly welcome, as the clouds hung low over 
the hills, and the signs in favor of snow or rain 
descending before very long. After traveling two 
days and some hours from Kelowna, in the valley 
of the Okanagan, we were within a mile or so of 
the mountain upon which we hoped to find a small 
herd of caribou ranging. To the west from where 
our tents were pitched we could see our hunting 
ground of the morrow, its bald top covered with a 
recent fall of snow, standing out coldly white upon 
the sky line. In the background, between us and 
the mountain, there were some gloomy firs. The 
country was undulating, and thinly dotted with 
spruce trees, clumped more or less together, and 
between the clumps there were innumerable open 
spaces, covered sparsely with a growth of white 
moss, on which the caribou feeds. It was here we 
were to look for our quary. 

We had already 'seen the fresh tracks as we 
entered the valley, and as night settled over us and 
we lay down, I cannot but imagine all our thoughts 
ran in the same direction. With myself, at all events, 
it was a night of wakefulness — one of those nights 
the hunter occasionally experiences, when he can 
do nothing but shift from side to side, and listen to 
the usual sounds of the forest after dark; it may 
be the weird yelp of the coyote, or the somewhat 
dismal cry of the loon, as it echoes across the waters 
of some lonely lake, sunk deep in the forest — what- 
ever it is, there you lie, sleep is impossible, and 
you long for the first flush of dawn. At last the 
morning broke fine and clear, the sun shone out 
beautifully, and the snow that fell through the night 
clung to the gloomy trees, turning them into a 
scene of dazzling brightness. Crisp and sharp was 
the air as we started out after I made off in another 
direction. I tramped quickly over the snow, which 
was still dry and powdery, until I reached the 
summit of a small hill, where I struck the tracks of 
three caribou, which had gone off down the other 
slope. I followed them till the middle of the day 
was past, and I felt quite tired. Just as I was ahaut 
to give up the hunt, there suddenly appeared some 
200 yards in front of me, standing in an open 
space on a side-hill, a fine buck (Columbian deer). 
Should I shoot him, or should I still pursue the 
caribou? My mind was soon made up, and I de- 
cided on the former course. Taking steady aim 
at the deer, I killed him instantly with a well-directed 
shot through the shoulder. His horns were small 
and light, but they were regular and measured well 
in spread. I skinned his neck, severing it from the 
shoulders, and with his head, and a small additional 
pack of fresh meat, liver and kidney, I started back 
for camp. At this time it must have been about 
three p. m., for the sun was sinking, and I was 
quite two miles away. Realizing the position, I 
pushed on hastily, walking for several hours without 
a stop, except for a few moments to fix my pack. 
As it was, daylight had vanished before I reached 
my camp, and the moon was at its full, shining 
softly over the forest. 

As I made my way to the fire, I could see two 
great skins hanging over poles near the tent, and 
as I approached I was told of my friend's good 
luck. Shortly after we parted in the morning, E. 
and his excellent guide had quite suddenly run 
across a small herd of caribou, closely hidden in 
the thickest of green timber. At first they saw 
only a cow; then they heard a bull snorting and 
stamping, and finally caught sight of the tops of his 
horns behind the bushes. Some further exercise 
of patience was rewarded with a view of his mag- 
nificent head, as he forced his way slowly through 
the spruces and stood quite in the open. Apparently 
the animal had not observed either E. or his guide, 
and offered the hunters a most excellent shot. 
Availing himself of such an unlooked for opportunity, 
E. took aim, hastily fired, and brought the great 
beast down. When they approached they found it 
quite dead, and were preparing to skin It, when 
suddenly four cows and three more bulls hove in 
sight. None of the latter were carrying very large 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908. 



horns, but they were fine young stags, and in splen- 
did condition. What a splendid time E. must have 
had as he stood in the midst of these noble beasts! 
Fortunately, he was a sportsman of the right type, 
and was satisfied with shooting a second bull and 
allowing the others their lives and freedom. Such 
sport as this within a comparatively short distance 
of mines, where blasting work was going on is hard- 
ly credible, but all that is here set down is fact. 
It was too dark for me to examine my friend's tro- 
phies that evening. The following morning, how- 
ever, I was greatly pleased when I saw what a 
beautiful pair of heads he had secured. 

Both of us went out again, E. after a buck and I 
to look for a caribou. As the day advanced and I 
trudged on, crossing valley after valley, climbing 
and descending hills, fording creeks, and making 
my way through many patches of dense under- 
growth, I began to realize that I had covered many 
miles, and must be a great distance from our tents. 
All this time I had not seen a fresh track, or caught 
a sight of the kind of animal I was after. Finally 
I gave up, and struck back towards camp, taking 
a circuitous route in a direction that I thought might 
bring me better luck. 

I was so far right that I did see several deer, 
none of which I felt justified In shooting, as their 
horns were smaller than those already in my pos- 
session. Once again it was evening when I arrived 
in camp, and with the exception of a short rest 
on a dead log, where I sat for a few minutes to 
eat my lunch of bannock and bacon, I had been on 
the move all day. E. was in camp when I arrived, 
and in the green timber he had killed a baby goat. 
What this lonely creature could be doing in this 
part of British Columbia, far away from goatland, 
or high mountains, such as they generaly range 
over, is an unexplained mistery to me. It can be 
inferred that its mother, tiring of her accustomed 
feeding grounds, had ventured across country in 
search of richer pasture, taking the offspring with 
her. In his journey she had probably met with an 
untimely fate, leaving her baby to wander and 
get lost. In addition to the goat, E. had seen three 
deer and a porcupine, but none of the' former were 
big enough to warrant E. shooting at them. 

The next two days we spent traveling, and cutting 
a trail through a roughish bit of country to the head- 
waters of .he Kettle river. In the mountains near 
the source of this stream we hunted several days 
without securing any further trophies. Caribou 
tracks were plentiful, but try as we could we couldn't 
come up to them. They seemed to be traveling, not 
feeding, and though we followed the tracks of several 
bands for miles, we never caught even the most 
distant sight of them. They seemed to do without 
feed, or if they did do a little, it was only for a 
moment to nibble carelessly at the black moss 
hanging from the pine trees. 

Two more buck, numerous grouse, and one or 
two smaller quadrupeds were added to our bag be- 
fore we began our ride towards the Okanagan. 
On the whole, we were more than satisfied with our 
hunt, and not the least disappointed at seeing the 
waters of the Kettle, a river alone well worth the 
trouble of going to British Columbia to visit; and 
draining a country that every sportsman should see 
for himself. 

o 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The total number of entries for the Del Monte 
show is 155, which will make L ne show a two-point 
count for championship honors. 

The entries by breeds are as follows: American 
Foxhounds 6, Pointers 3, English Setters 9, Gordon 
Setters 3, Irish Setters 5, Irish Water Spaniels 2, 
Field Spaniels 2, Cocker Spaniels 14, Dachsfiundes 
3, Collies 13, Poodles 2, Dalmatians 1, Bulldogs 9, 
Airedales 3, Bull Terriers "12, French Bulldogs 5, 
Boston Terriers 16, Fox Terriers (smooth coats) 14, 
Fox Terriers (wire hairs) 9, Toy Terriers 1, Pomer- 
ranians 3, Pekinese Spaniels 2, Japanese Spaniels 
1, Italian Greyhounds 2, Toy Poodles 2, Ladies 
Variety class 8. 



Glen Tana Collie Kennels' Glen Tana Sybil and 
Glen Tana Squire, both by Ch. Squire of Tytton, were 
each first in winners, open and limit and also an- 
nexed several specials at the Butte, Mont, show, 
December 19-21. G. W. Clayton judged, the show 
counted two points. 



George Cranfield had the ill luck to lose his good 
Bull Terrier bitch Hawthorne Betty two weeks ago. 
Betty was in whelp to John Cawkwell's Silkwood 
Surprise. Mr. Cranfield's Woodcote Ditto, a Ch. 
Woodcote Wonder bitch, is in whelp to Miss Jennie 
Crocker's Silkwood. 



Queenie, a Pointer bitch belonging to Mr. A. L. 
Holling, and a winner at the last San Mateo show, 
has joined the canine majority. The bitch was be- 
ing trained for field shooting and gave promise of 
becoming a fine worker to the gun. 



Ch. Anfield Model is at stud in the Valverde Ken- 
nels, located near Yountville, Napa county. 



How could a Foxhound find his way home over a 
rough country and with his head enveloped by a 
large milk can? Such, however, is the remarkable 
feat accomplished by a dog according to the follow- 
ing account taken from Antioch Ledger. The dog, 
Spark by name, is owned by Bert Whitman of Los 
Angeles. Spark went hunting, recently, with his 



master, and when it became dark he was still running 
a crafty old fox up on the side of the Pico mountain. 
There was no catching the hound and no calling 
him off, so Whitman left him to return when he got 
ready. Frequently he had packed his gun down the 
mountain while the hound was still baying on a 
hot scent, and he had no fear as to his showing up 
in the night. 

At ten o'clock, when there were no signs of Spark, 
Whitman left the kitchen door ajar, placed a big 
pan of mush and soup bones on the floor, and went 
to bed. Three hours later he was awakened by a 
clattering in the kitchen, and a moment later 'the 
hound, with his head stuck into a two-gallon milk 
can, waddled erratically into the bedroom. 

To say that the animals master was surprised is 
putting it mildly. At first he was not sure that it 
was his dog, but after he spoke, Spark thumped his 
tail and tried to climb into bed. 

It was necessary for him to use a can opener to 
free the dog, and this took some fifteen minutes. 
All this time Spark stood perfectly still, but the mo- 
ment he was released he made for his supper, and 
ate as if famished. 

The animal probably found the can near some 
camp, for it was covered with rust. Doglike, he in- 
vestigated the interior with hopes of finding food, 
and could not remove his head. 

Just how he found the way home, for he could not 
see through the bottom of the can, is the problem. 



Sir Henry Howorth, who wrote "A History of the 
Mongols," met at an afternoon reception a young 
woman who, after surveying him with interest, 
launched into a discourse on dogs, telling him she 
had three, and had always been pleased that each of 
them had such a good pedigree. "Though I don't 
know that it counts for much," she said at last. 
"Some of yours are cleverer than any of mine." 
"But I have no dogs," said Sir Henry, bewildered. 
"Oh, well I mean those you've written about," said 
the young woman, quickly. "But I've never writ- 
ten about any," said Sir Henry. "You haven't?" ex- 
claimed the young woman. "Why, I'm sure some- 
body told me you had written a book on mongrels!" 

o 

THE MEXICAN HAIRLESS DOG. 



Darwin, Huxley and Spencer in all their excursions 
into the theory of evolution have never been able 
to account for the Mexican hairless dog. Wise 
savants have pondered on this deep subject in vain. 
Now comes Theodore McKenna, a will-known 
trainer of trick dogs and breeder as well, and in 
the columns of the Los Angeles Herald he tells the 
real secret concerning the cause of the Mexican dog's 
similarity to David B. Hill's pate. 

According to McKenna the Mexican hairless dog 
bears a prouder pedigree than most other breeds, 
and records show that this strange little creature 
extends back into the very dawn of history, thou- 
sands of years before the Caucasian established his 
system in civilization in the new world. 

Heretofore, authorities on dogs have flatly stated 
their ignorance concerning the Mexican hairless 
dog, claiming that little is known as to the origin 
of this breed or as to its history since that period. 
Elroy Foote refers to the Chinese crested dog, so 
called from having a crest of hair running along 
the top of the head from front to back. In addi- 
tion to this, he says, the dog has a duft of hair at 
the end of his tail, but otherwise with the exception 
of a few scattering hairs around the head and just 
above the feet, the dog is perfectly hairless, the 
skin being more or less mottled in some specimens. 

There is another hairless dog, said to come from 
China, considerably smaller than the one mentioned 
above, weighing from eight to ten pounds, and 
without any hair at all. The head is like an apple 
headed toy terrier, with large bat ears standing 
out from the head, a very fine tail, and the skin of a 
uniform dark color. Other hairless dogs are referred 
to as being native to Africa, Brazil, Buenos Ayres, 
Turkey, India, and China. But there is only one 
Mexican hairless dog. He is in a class all by him- 
self and is easily distinguishable from other so- 
calleci hairless dogs. 

Elroy Foote says: "Whether these various strains 
of hairless dogs found in the various hot climates 
are of common origin, whether they have been dis- 
tributed trom some one country to the others, or 
whether they are the result of the so-called law of 
evolution, we can only conjecture. Whether in some 
quarter of the globe a breed of dogs has always 
existed none of which had hair, because they did not 
need it, or whether they were once clothed with hair 
which gradually disappeared because they did not 
need it, who can say? If a strain of Pugs or Fox 
Terriers were colonized in Central Africa and bred 
there twenty-five, fifty or 100 years, would their hair 
gradually disappear? Such a supposition seems to 
be hardly plausible, since the wild dogs of India, 
many of whom live almost under the equator, are 
thickly coated with hair, as are nearly all other 
quadrupeds in hot countries. 

Why, then, should one breed of small dogs exist 
entirely hairless? Will some Tyndall kindly investi- 
gate and give us the why and the wherefore? 

"In Mexico, among the natives, these dogs are 
used externally for the treatment of rheumatism, 
and internally to assuage the pangs of hunger. There 
would necessarily be more virtue in their warm lit- 
tle bodies as a natural substitute for the hot-water 
bags than as an article of diet, at least judging 
from our civilized standpoint. 



"The hairless dog is a pet. and house dog only, 
and as such has some good qualities that his hairy 
brethren have not. He is naturally cleanly, a pe- 
culiarity not possessed by any other native Mexican, 
nor leaves hair about on furniture or clothes, does 
not have fleas or any odor other than that of the 
soap with which one can keep his skin as sweet and 
pleasant to the touch as one's own. 

"Puppies are at birth "much lighter in hue than 
when older, many of the white spots becoming by 
degrees smaller and beautifully less, and some en- 
tirely disappearing." 

Theodore McKenna has made a special study of 
the Mexican hairless dog, and is qualified to explain 
the mystery surrounding that marvelous animal. 

Hs says: "Clavigero describes a large hairless 
dog found among the Mexicans by the Spanish con- 
querors, whose puppies were esteemed as an edible 
delicacy, and others are reported to have occurred 
in ancient Peru and on various of the West Indian 
islands. 

"Relics of the Mexican hairless dogs are found 
in the vast stone buildings of the Aztecs and Toltecs 
of the Nahua nation, most of them being minor 
statuettes, carvings, amulets and ornaments in stone, 
besides many elaborately carved gold ornaments in 
the shape of this dog. 

"Much of the ancient, richly colored pottery is 
beautifully ornamented with elaborate signs and 
figures of the Mexican hairless dog abound in gor- 
geous profusion. Although each of the separate 
ancient tribes and nations possesses its distinctive 
and individual ware, the pictures of the Mexican 
hairless dog appear on all without exception. 

"All these relics bear mute testimony to the cus- 
toms, habits and religious rites of the native races, 
showing the high esteem held by the Mexican hair- 
less dog in the estimation of the people of that 
time. 

"Prof. Carl Lumholtz, the eminent ethnologist, is 
said to have witnessed this among the primitive 
Huichols, or Virarikos, a little known tribe of In- 
dians in the State of Jalisco. 

"The age of the species of hairless dog in Mexico 
is indicated by the fact that mention of it is fre- 
quently mingled with the carefully preserved tradi- 
tions of the Huichols. which include a version of 
a flood which lasted five years and an ark which 
rested on a mountain in Mexico, instead of Mount 
Ararat. The representations of this ark and the 
tradition that the Mexican hairless dog was the 
chief of the animals saved by it and Grandmother 
Growth, who predicted the flood, are among the 
objects of veneration that are used in the cere- 
monials. 

"Impressive carvings of tht* Mexican hairless dog 
are found in the ruins of monuments, temples and 
cities scattered throughout the land, notably among 
the cliff ruins and deserted pueblos of the Casas 
Grandes and other localities in the State of Chihua- 
hua in the north; those of Quemada in Zacatecas 
farther south; of Tula, the northernmost center of 
Toltec culture, and in the remains of chambers 
carved out of the solid rock on the hill of Texcoc- 
ingo, a few miles beyond Texcoco. 

"Actual documents of native Aztec history in 
their ideographic writing, which have been deciphered 
and published, devote long stories to the Mexican 
hairless dog. 

"Fernando-de-Alva-Ixtlicochiti, the royal Texucan 
chronicler, Tezozomoc, son of Cuitlamac, the last 
Mexican Emperor, and others after the Spanish 
conquest, drew up intrepretations of many of these 
tales of the ancient and honorable race of Mexican 
hairless dogs. 

"This is the reason for the Mexican dog being 
hairless, according to the old Indian tradition: Once 
upon a time there lived a God named Gugumatz, who 
was a wonderful nagual, or magician. He aroused 
the wrath of the other gods by refusing to exert his 
powers to conjure the clouds when there was danger 
of hail, so that the crops might not be injured. Be- 
sides this offense he terrified human beings by 
making a stick look like a serpent, a mat like a 
centipede, a piece of stone like a scorpion, and 
other strange things. So the other gods determined 
to capture him, and although they could not kill him, 
as he was endowed with immortality, they resolved 
to get the best of Gugumatz by trickery. 

"Now, Gugumatz was wont to turn himself into 
different animals to scare his enemies, but it was 
the law that he could not turn himself back unless 
he was intact. The other gods caught him, and he 
turned first into a tiger, then into a weasel, then 
into an owl and finally into a dog. The other gods 
threw him into the fire, and the hair was burned off 
his body, expect a few hairs on the top of his head 
and under his legs. Gugumatz, having lost his hair, 
was not intact, and lost his power of transformation, 
so he remained a dog. 

"And so he is to-day, and that is why the Mexican 
dog is hairless. This old myth is interesting, be- 
cause hair cannot be made to grow on a Mexican 
dog to this day, no matter how much artificial hair 
grower of other medicaments are rubbed into the 
flesh." 

o 

A gun club has been formed at West Riverside, 
called the "Horse Shoe Gun Club," of which W. A. 
Hudson is secretary. The club has leased Horse 
Shoe Lake from the Rogers Development Company, 
and the general public is now wlarned to stay out. 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 1 



DISEASE OF THE TENDON. 



[C. R. Wood, V. S., in American Horse Breeder.] 
Inflammation of the flexor tendons is very fre- 
quent in the horse, and generally occurs in the fore 
limbs, on account of their being much more exposed 
to the violent strains which form the general cause 
of the disease. 

Horses with weak flexor tendons, heavy bodies 
and powerful muscles, are predisposed to tendonitis. 
The structure of the tendon, and consequently its 
powers of resisting strain, is of the greatest import- 
ance. Its absolute thickness bears no direct pro- 
portion to its strength. On the contrary, tendons of 
considerable size and surrounded by abundant para- 
tendineum suffer more frequently than the sharply 
defined and those which are firm to the touch. The 
latter peculiarity shows that the tendons are well 
provided with firm fascicular tissue, whilst in the 
first case they consist more of connective tissue. 
Rupture and inflammation following severe diseases, 
are in fact, at least, to be referred to this fact. 
Further, all conditions which increase the load on 
the limb and the strain on the flexor tendons favor 
tendonitis. 

Long, weak and slender fetlocks are especially 
liable to it. The strain on the tendons is increased 
by increased length and obliquity of the fetlocks. 
The more slender the fetlock joint appears when 
seen from the animal's side, the greater the me- 
chanical disadvantage at which the tendons are 
placed. For a similar reason, horses with "tied in' 
knees are disposed to tendonitis, this formation be- 
ing generally accompanied with small size of the 
fetlock. Further, everything which favors dorsal 
flexion of the joint increases risk of inflammation of 
the flexor tendons. Low heels and long toes are, 
therefore, apt to cause it. Long toes throw a power- 
ful strain on the flexor tendons during the latter 
phase of movement, just before the limb is lifted 
from the ground. 

The kind of work required of the horse is also 
important. Thus, race horses and horses required 
to trot a sharp pace for long periods are the most 
general sufferers. Animals with considerable powers 
of endurance suffer most. The greater the muscular 
development of the hind-quarters, the greater the 
shocks produced in the fore-limbs by the violence 
with which the weight of the body is thrown for- 
ward on them. Spirited animals suffer more than 
phlegmatic ones For similar reasons cart-horses 
show strain more frequently in the hind limbs. 
Such strains of flexor tendons are produced either 
by the body weight falling on the front limbs, 
when the horse is jumped or suddenly pulled up — 
passive strains, or by continued violent action of 
the flexor muscles — active strains. 

In the first instance the ^exor perforatus is prin- 
cipally involved. Its length causes it to suffer first 
from forced dorsal flexion of the phalanx. The 
flexor perforatus is less likely to be injured. The 
effective length must be reckoned as the distance 
between the lower insertion and the upper one, and 
in the perforatus and perforatus tendons from the 
upper insertion of the so-called cheek ligaments. 

Inflammation of tendons, produced by excessive 
muscular action (acteris sprains), have, with few 
exceptions, their seat in the flexor perforatus, be- 
cause the muscular head of this tendon is by far 
the stronger, and its tendon is therefore exposed 
to the greater strain. But passive strains also 
occur, as shown by the frequency with which the 
cheek ligament, which extends to the lower portions 
of the tendon, becomes diseased. 

In the hind legs the portions of the flexor pedis 
perforatus tendon which suffer oftenest are those 
lying just above the fetlock, or below the hock. 
Bruises are rare causes of inflammation of tendons, 
though seen in the flexor perforatus, its surface situ- 
ation more readily allowing of injury from kicks, 
etc. Inflammation sometimes extends from the ten- 
don sheaths, or articular surfaces, to the flexor 
tendons, and the form associated with infectious 
diseases, and occurring during convalescence from 
thoracic influenza, always starts in the tendon 
sheath. The first sign of inflammation is a peculiar 
semi-soft swelling just above the fetlock, which ex- 
tends thence to the perforans and perforatus ten- 
dons. I have often seen a similar appearance and 
look on such cases as due to secretory metastatis. 
In convalescents the inflammation sometimes orig- 
inates in the perforatus tendon, particularly when 
animals are worked too early. The interference 
with general nutrition produced during the disease 
is probably the predisposing cause. 

Inflammation of the flexor tendon is accompanied 
by the following symptoms: 

1. Lameness, which varies according to the po- 
sition and extend of injury The form seen after in- 
fluenza is usually the most painful; that following 
mechanical injury of the perforatus less so. In 
tendonitis of the flexor perforatus lameness is slight. 
When only one division of the tendon is affected 
lameness may be observed. 

Lameness is shown only when weight is placed 
on the limb. Attempts are made to shorten that 
phase of movement, during which the pha- 
lanx is in a position of volar flexion, that is, up- 
right and under the body. Neither passive, exten- 
sion nor rotary appear painful, a fact which dis- 
tinguishes the disease in question from disease of 
the joint. The symptoms are then, supporting leg 
lameness; shortening of the period when the limb 
is upright; volar flexion of the phalanx and ab- 
sence of pain when the limb is rotated. Sometimes 



animals try to place weight on the diseased limb 
by setting the heels on an eminence, e. g., on a 
stone, and by thus bringing the fetlock into an up- 
right position, minimize the tension of the tendons. 
This is well seen in the hind limbs during disease 
of the flexor perforatus. When lameness is severe 
the animal never stands so completely on the foot, 
even when at rest, as it occasionally does in disease 
of the joint. 

2. Local examination detects pain, swelling and 
increased warmth, which, however, is only seen 
early in the disease, and even then indistinctly. 
It is difficult to distinguish pain in the reinforcing 
band of the flexor perforatus, though it occasionally 
suffers. In applying pressure to the tendons, it is 
important not to be deceived by mere general sensi- 
tiveness. 

The swelling varies in degree and extent, being 
scarcely ever visible in the flexor perforatus, or re- 
inforcing band, even in "clean" legs, and in other 
cases only being detected by palpitation. At first 
it is soft and diffuse; later it becomes harder and 
sometimes sharply defined. In examining for pain 
and swelling the foot is lifted. The reinforcing 
bands can only be properly examined in this posi- 
tion. 

3. The symptoms enumerated are afterwards fol- 
lowed by shortening of the diseased tendon, continu- 
ous volar flexion and upright position of the hoof. 
This is differentiated from the volar flexion produced 
by placing weight on the leg, by the fact that it 
continues even when the animal stands fairly on 
the limb The point is at once settled by lifting 
the other foot. While contraction of the flexor per- 
foratus produces volar flexion in all the lower joints, 
contraction in the flexor perforatus and suspensory 
ligaments only affects the obliquity of the pastern. 
The hoof remains in its normal position. In race 
horses a large number of fasciculi of the flexor per- 
foratus may be ruptured, producing abnormal flexion 
of the phalanges, and so-called "break-down." This 
is oftenest seen when both limbs suffer, or when 
the animal is forced to stand continuously on the 
diseased limb. 

The disease always occurs suddenly, and the ana- 
tomical structure of the tendons explains its sub- 
sequent chronic course. After strain or rupture 
isolated hemorrhages and hperaemia of the tendon 
set in, and are followed by serous infiltratine into 
the interfascicular connective tissue and paraten- 
dineum. The fasciculi of the tendon are thus thrust 
asunder, and predisposed to further rupture. At the 
the seat of serous infiltratine more leucocytes after- 
wards appear (plastic infiltratine) causing the swell- 
ing, which is at first soft, to assume harder char- 
acter. 

In section the parts display grayish white, some- 
times grayish red, masses of connecting tissue. In 
consequence of extravasation of leucocytes the cells 
of the firm connective tissue thickening results, 
which may lead to shortening of the tendon, as the 
newly formed tissue contracts, while the para- 
tenditis leads to adhesion with neighboring tissues. 
The tendon becomes permeated with blood vessels. 
Ossification has sometimes been seen and parasites 
met with in inflameu tendons. I have seen a case 
in the horse in which the ussamoid ligaments were 
ossified and the flexor perforatus changed into 
cartilage. 

Knuckling over may either be brought about by 
shortening of tendons, in consequence of cicatritial 
contraction, or of contraction of muscles. In the first 
case, only the lower joints take up the position of 
volar flexion. When muscles are involved the knee- 
joint is also bowed over. All cicatritial tissue, 
whether in tendon or elsewhere, is inclined to 
shrink, but the excessive development of this 
tendency is seen only when the limb is rested and 
entirely relieved of weight. Provided weight is 
placed on the limb, even occasionally, it never be- 
comes so excessive. After contraction the fibres of 
the tendons no longer run in a straight direction 
but take a tortuous course. 

On account of the peculiar character of the pa- 
thological processes, tendonitis varies greatly in 
course and results Complete reabsorption of in- 
flammatory products occurs in eight to fourteen 
days, when the case is favorable, and when rest and 
early careful treatment are adopted, but in most in- 
stances some thickening remains. Though lameness 
usually disappears in three or four weeks the newly 
formed tissue has not the strength of normal tendons 
and a point of less resistance results, which explains 
the frequent relapses. Continuous, severe pain 
points to serious local change, and often causes 
"knuckling over." The prognosis, therefore, depends 
chiefly on the degree of pain. The results of strains 
of the flexor tendons depend very largely on the 
region involved, the most serious being those which 
affect the suspensory ligament and the reinforcing 
bands, in which complete revolution is rare. Next 
comes the flexor perforatus. Inflammation of the 
flexor perforatus is less troublesome. The animal's 
usefulness is not impaired, even though considerable 
thickening remains. Needless to say the older the 
condition the less chance of recovery. When lame- 
ness is of old standing the outlook is bad. The con- 
dition is Still graver when both limbs arc; affected. 
When the joints are much shot-over, tenotomy is 
sometimes successful, but this depends on whether 
the flexor tendons are adherent to one another, or 
both, or to their lower sheaths. Adhesion of the 
flexor perforatus with the perforatus is always 
troublesome, though cure is not entirely out of the 
question. Tendonitis occurring during infectious dis- 



eases is more obstinate than inflammation me- 
chanically produced in otherwise sound animals. 
Great pain and resistance to treatment point to an 
infectious origin, though such swellings occasionally 
disappear after 12 to 24 hours when the sheath of 
the tendon is only slightly involved. 

The most important point is to stop work. When 
possible, absolute rest should be given and the shoe 
removed. Fresh cases, due to mechanical injury, 
are treated during the first 24 to 48 hours by cold 
applications, the best being in the shape of some 
freezing mixture, but after this time little good re- 
sults from the employment of cold. I then prefer 
moist warmth, supplemented by proper bandaging, 
applied as follows: After carefully cleansing the 
parts, two long rolls of oakum, rather thicker than 
a man's thumb are moistened and laid lengthwise 
on either side of the diseased tendon, close to the 
metacarpus, and fixed there by a linen or cotton 
bandage, wet and applied pretty tightly. Over this 
a dry woolen bandage is placed, so as to exercise 
regular pressure on the material below and on the 
diseased spot. When available a piece of rubber 
tissue, or waxen linen, may be placed between the 
two bandages. The moist warmth and regular press- 
ure favor reparative changes. Excessive extrava- 
sation and cellular proliferation are checked, and 
resorption assisted The rolls of oakum must exer- 
cise even pressure on the diseased tendon. 

When pain disappears, massage may be resorted 
to during the interval of changing the dressing, the 
injured tendon being rubbed from below upwards, 
with the thumb and forefinger, using moderate press- 
ure, for about five minutes at a time, the parts being 
meantime covered with a piece of brown paper. The 
operation must not be persevered with if pain or 
swelling follows. When early and carefully used, 
massage cures and removes the swelling in cases 
where, with the antiphlogistic methods formerly 
employed, thickening almost always remains. The 
slight vascularity of tendons in no way supports the 
theory of the action of cold; on the other hand, the 
moist warmth and methodical compression assist 
absorption, and are certainly not so likely to im- 
pede absorption as cold 

The action of blisters is largely due to the me- 
chanical effort of infraction, and the pressure of 
the cutaneous thickening on the inflamed spot, and 
when the above described treatment proves im- 
practicable it is good practice to apply a blister. 
Liquid is the best, and repeat when the parts have 
thoroughly healed. 

Old thickenings are best treated by severe firing. 
In this case, the chief effect is produced by the 
mechanical action of the inflammatory swelling and 
cicatricial shrinkage in the cutis, the loins running 
straight from the front backwards, should not be 
wider apart than half an inch and should meet at 
the back of the perforatus tendon. After the scab 
has fallen the parts can be blistered, and when they 
have thoroughly healed the above described pressure 
dressing can be again appied. 

In shoeing horses with disease of the perforans 
or perforatus the heels should be spared and the 
toe shortened as much as possible, and shoes with 
calkins, or thick heels, used. For many years it has 
been disputed whether raising the heels by calkins 
exercises any influence on the angle of the pha- 
langes towards the ground. In my opinion this is 
certainly the case, for the pedal and coronet joints, 
at least, and for the former to a greater extent 
than for the latter. The position of the fetlock-joint 
and the fetlock angle are, however, scarcely affected 
by the dorsal flexion so produced in the pedal and 
coronet joints. Raising the heels, therefore, has no 
effect on the suspensory ligament, but that it is use- 
ful in inflammation of the tendons I have convinced 
myself. 

o 

COULD EQUAL FRANCE. 



Joseph D. Wing of Chicago, who recently returned 
from a visit to France, addressed the Washington 
Live Stock Association, December 18th, at its session 
held at Spokane and said: 

"There is no reason in the world why this section 
of the west can not produce just as good or better 
horses than France. There is a great demand for 
horses, and the price is high and they will never 
be any cheaper. There is a large amount of money 
spent abroad for draft horses that could be kept at 
home. There is about $1,000,000 spent annually with 
Fiance, Germany and England for draft horses. I 
saw 500 draft horses in France, the best they pro- 
duced, and we could have produced just as good 
animals in America I personally investigated the 
conditions in France and found they never over- 
worked their horses in France, as they do in 
America. They also take better care of them and 
never let them go hungry, but they are never stuffed. 
They raise all kinds of clovers and grasses and have 
sufficient pasturage for their animals. 

"This section of the west has the same oppor- 
tunity for raising feed for its animals. The breeders 
of France keep part of their stallions at work, while 
others are on the road part of the time. The breed- 
ers have options on the colts and buy the best of 
them. Until the breeder is through with an ani- 
mal no amount of money can induce him to part 
with a stallion." 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. is you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



12 



T H 13 BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908, 



THE FARM J 

ARGUMENTS FOR PURE BRED.S. 



Why is the pure-bred fowl better 
than the mongrel? The reasons are 
many, says the "Rural Home." For 
one, you can always depend on the 
pure-bred for uniform growth. Take 
a mongrel hen, and her chickens will 
vary. They never grow fast, and one 
or two in the bunch will be ready for 
market two months before the others. 
Not only that: the pure bred are 
uniform in looks after dressing and 
sell higher on this account for breed- 
ing and hatching purposes. Their 
eggs and themselves always sell 
higher than the market price. Per- 
sons raising the pure-bred exclusive- 
ly in this country must keep all their 
eggs from early spring until hatch- 
ing the eggs; and now, since incubat- 
ors are so useful and common, those 
who want eggs often order many 
weeks ahead to get all they need. 
Another reason is that the mongrel 
hen averages at the best about forty 
eggs per year. The pure-bred laying 
breeds, with worse care given, will 
lay over a hundred eggs, and with 
moderate attention I have known 
them to lay very close to 200 eggs 
per year. 

What is needed is to bring our 
pure-breds up to the highest type 
of hardiness, utility and beauty, and 
then for the poultry farmer to use 
only fowls that are strictly pure in 
blood. Until then poultry raising will 
be more or less an uncertainty. 
When good blood is used, we see 
success in all branches of live stock. 
Blood is the foundation of success. 
In all the established businesses the 
best is what must be secured for 
foundation. Mongrel hens may 
answer some owners, but the best is 
the cheapest in the long run, and 
those who would prosper in the future 
poultry business must produce the 
best for breeding. As a rule, you 
can not buy a breeders' best birds 
unless he raises them in large num- 
bers and has more good birds than 
he needs for his own breeding pens 
— birds fully as good as he has elected 
for his own use. If he is an honest 
breeder, you can buy eggs for hatch- 
ing from his best pens, and the 
chances are you can raise birds just 
as good as his best at a small cost. 
Start right by saving only the best 
eggs from the selected hens for in- 
cubation, the most prolific layers. 

o 

STATION NOTES. 



In treating calf scours at the Mich- 
igan station a mixture of tincture of 
rhubarb, camphor and opiate, equal 
parts, in hot water, is used. Dose, a 
teaspoonful. In one case a calf with 
scours was treated successfully after 
it was so near death the feet were 
stretched out cold and stiff and there 
was every symptom of death. The 
calf was given medicine and fed raw 
eggs and milk occasionally and he re- 
covered and made one of the best 
feeders in the bunch. 

Pigs to breed well should not be too 
fat says the Kansas station. It is the 
aim of successful breeders of swine 
to keep their animals in a medium 
condition, neither too fat nor too thin. 
A sow that is too fat will be hard to 
get with pig, will be less prolific and 
will make a poorer mother than a 
thin sow. The fat animal is likely to 



roll on her pigs, and the pigs from 
these sows are apt to be small and 
weakly. Do not breed sows until 
they are ten to twelve months old, 
and then keep them in medium flesh 
and they will do better than if too 
fat. Proper food and special care and 
attention are necessary to raise good 
pigs. 

The Pennsylvania experiment sta- 
tion has issued a bulletin on relative 
value of feeding stuffs. It contains 
the results of certain feeding stuffs 
for maintenance and for fattening 
determined by means of the respira- 
tion calorimeter. It was found that 
these values were decidedly lower 
than those computed according to cur- 
rent methods from the amounts of di- 
gestible matter present. Coarse fod- 
der in particular was found to Jiave 
much lower value for maintenance, as 
well as for fattening, then concen- 
trated feeds, the relative values of 
the former as compared with the 
latter being greatly overestimated in 
the feeding tables in common use. 

Cornell University experiment sta- 
tion at Ithaca, N. Y., has just issued 
two bulletins. One entitled Root 
Crops for Stock Feeding, and the 
other, on Culture and Varieties of 
Roots for Stock Feeding. The bul- 
letins deal with mangels, sugar beets, 
turnips, hybrid turnips, rutabagas, 
kohlrabi, carrots and parsnips. Roots 
make a good feed for all classes of 
farm animals, and can be used to 
advantage by more feeders than at 
present use them. The experiment 
of English feeders proves the value 
of roots as a supplemental feed. 
o 

KIND OF SKINS IN DEMAND. 



Not all kinds of goat skins are in 
demand for leather. The skin of 
the Angora, for instance, is not at 
all suitable for shoe leather or for 
kid gloves, although tanners make of 
it morocco leather, and it is used to 
considerable extent in the manufac- 
ture of workingmen's gloves. A pro- 
minent Philadelphia dealer in goat- 
skin, says: "The pelt of the Angora, 
whether it be from Turkey or else 
where is as a rule too thin and poor 
for leather, as it is a fact that the 
longer the hair of the goat the thin- 
ner and poorer the pelt." This be- 
ing true, not only are Angoras put 
out of consideration, but also all 
goats having long hair. This elim- 
inates a very large number of the 
goats of the United States or any 
other long haired variety. Not all 
of the imported skins are suitable 
for shoe leather, but the tanner care- 
fully sorts each bale and throws out 
all that have long hair, as that is 
conclusive evidence of inferiority. 

Among the French mountaineers 
the raising of kids for their skins is 
a leading industry. Softness, delic- 
acy of texture, and freedom from 
blemish are principal factors in the 
value of kid skins, and to secure these 
essentials great pains are taken. So 
soon as the kids are old ' enough to 
eat grass or other vegetation the 
skin declines in quality, as with such 
diet the skin begins to grow coarser 
and harder in texture, and thus its 
chief merit disappears. The kid is 
therefore carefully penned, not only 
to prevent it from eating grass, but 
also to secure the skin from acciden- 
tal injury from scratches and brnises, 
which necessarily impair its value. 
When the kids have reached a certain 
age, at which the skins are in the 
best condition for the use of the 
glover, they are killed and the hides 
are sold to hawkers, through whom 
they reach the great centers of the 
tanning industry. The conditions in 
the United States, especially as re- 
gards the item of labor, are so unlike 
those of mountainous France that it 
is not at all probable that a similar 
industry could be maintained here. — 
Government Bulletin. 

o 

Twenty-two agricultural students 
from Missouri University entered the 
State Fair judging contest at Sedalia, 
and won twenty-three out of twenty- 
four valuable money prizes. The fair 
board offered $250 in prizes to be 
awarded to the best judges of cattle, 
horses, sheep and swine. The college 
men who entered this contest were all 
trained at the university and made a 
good showing among the older expert 
judges of the show. 



RANGE TAX EATS UP PROFITS. 



"It will never pay to own land upon 
which sheep are to run east of the 
mountains," said William Hughes, a 
well-known sheep-raiser of Morrow 
county to a Portland, Oregon, re- 
porter the other day. "I therefore 
look for an entire extinction of the 
sheep-raising industry over there 
within a few years. 

"Where taxes on sheep range 
amount to 50 cents an acre each 
year, we cannot afford to raise sheep, 
as the animnls cannot pay the ex- 
pense. The reason of this is because 
grass only grows on the Eastern Ore- 
gon and Eastern Washington ranges 
for about three months in each year, 
and it takes too much land to graze 
a sheep the year around. 

"The Government is now charging 
sheepmen 15 cents a head for sheep 
run on the reserves of the Blue Moun- 
tains in the Summer time, and grass 
is scarce at that. The reserve ranges 
are badly crowded in the Summer 
months, and sheep naturally come 
out of the mountains poor in the fall. 
The prairies, where 25 years ago 
sheep could be pastured in the Win- 
ter, are now the property of farmers, 
and so are not available for sheep 
range any more. It follows, then, that 
sheep-raisers must either own the 
land their flocks run on or must rent 
from the farmers at such rates as to 
render the raising of sheep decidedly 
unprofitable. 

"Although sheep are to be extermi- 
nated from that portion of the North- 
west east of the mountains, they can 
still be raised to advantage on the 
farms west of the Cascades. Grass 
grows for ten months of the year, 
instead of three, and it takes less land 
to run the flocks. At present prices 
for wool and wethers there is actu- 
ally more money raising sheep in the 
Willamette Valley than there is in 
raising grain. 

o 

HIGH PRICE FOR A CALF. 



It pays every breeder of pure-bred 
cattle to strive for the best. There 
are high prices awaiting the animal 
of first-class pedigree. While pedi- 
gree is not all, the knowledge that the 
dams and grand dams have made 
great records go a long ways in in- 
fluencing the size of the price. This 
fact is exemplified in the enormous 
prices paid for animals of top notch 
breeding. 

The Farm Stock Journal learns that 
Charles S. Averill of Syracuse, has 
just paid $4,000 for a Holstein-Friesian 
bull calf, to be delivered to him at 
the age of nine months. This is be- 
lieved to be the largest price ever 
paid for so young a calf. 

The dam of the calf is Pontiac Rag 
Apple, which was sold for $8,000 to 
Field Bros., of Brocton, Mass., and 
the sire was the Milk and Butter 
King, formerly owned by Mr. Averill, 
and recently sold to a syndicate of 
Syracuse men for $10,000. All the 
animals are registered Holstein-Frie- 
sians. Mr. Averill's calf has been 
named King of Butter Kings. He 
is the only male calf in the world 
of whose dams in the pedigree aver- 
age thirty-two pounds of butter in 
seven days. 

That the young bull will prove him- 
self worthy of the price we have 
littie doubt. It pays to strive for the 
best. 

o 

FEED FOR DAIRY COW. 



The ration for dairy cows should 
be succulent and bulky, and at the 
same time be rich in protein. In sec- 
tions of the country where alfalfa can 
be cheaply grown, and has a value 
of $7 per ton, or less, many people 
question whether grain can be profita- 
bly fed with it. We understand, of 
course, that with a balanced ration 
we can get the greatest product; but 
the most vital point is to get the 
cheapest product. The feeder must 
determine such problems as this by 
experience, in many cases. Wheat 
hay, bran and potatoes would form 
a fairly good ration, but not neces- 
sarily a cheap one. In many sec- 
tions of the country clover can 
be grown more cheaply and have 



a lower value than wheat hay, being 
at the same time better adapted for 
dairy cows. Bran has about an equal 
value with oats, and a little greater 
value than wheat for dairy cows, so 
the choice between these feeds will 
be largely one of price. Among the 
root crops, generally speaking, man- 
gels,, or sugar beets can be grown in 
greater quantities, and will prove to 
be more suitable feed for dairy cows 
than potatoes; and, again, with po- 
tatoes, there is a greater danger of 
choking, unless pulping or slicing is 
resorted to. — Spokesman-Review. 

o 

SHOULD BREED PURE-BREDS. 



There are three good reasons why 
a lot of farmers should begin breeding 
pure-bred cattle and swine this fall, 
says the "Live Stock Journal." 

First of all, the ultimate end of all 
cattle breeding is high enough to be 
profitable to any farmer. Second, 
cow and heifer stuff never have been 
so scarce, per capita of our population, 
as they are now. The ranges are be- 
ing broken up and an unprecedented 
number of calves are being vealed. 
Hence, the best prospect for beef 
products and breeding stock to remain 
at present high prices, or to go higher. 
Third, the farmer never had so much 
money in the bank as at the present 
time. And as money is of no use, 
except as it can be put to use to in- 
crease itself, there is no form of in- 
vestment that will reproduce the origi- 
nal investment quicker than a pure- 
bred sow. 

o 

Fully one thousand invitations were 
mailed to well known stockmen 
of the Northwest to attend the fourth 
annual convention of the Washington 
Live Stock Association in Spokane, 
on December 18th and 19th. Some 
of the best known authorities on stock 
raising in the Northwest addressed 
the convention. The first address was 
by Joseph E. Wing of the Breeders' 
Gazette, Chicago. Professor H. T. 
French of the University of Idaho 
and Prof. E. E. Elliott of Wash- 
ington State College also ad- 
dressed the meeting. Other speakers 
were Paul Clagstone, Clagstone, 
Idaho; E. S. Waterman, Walla Walla; 
Dr. C. W. Deming, United States In- 
spector, Spokane; D. B. Sheller, For- 
est Superintendent of Wenatchee; L. 
McLean, President Spokane Canal 
Company; E. F. Benson, Prosser; 
George Urquhart, Krupp, Wash., and 
George L. Walker, Secretary of the 
National Wool Growers' Association, 
of Cheyenne, Wyo. The last address 
was one of particular interest, as 
sheep-raising is an industry which is 
just being introduced to the Island 
Empire. 

o 

TO FATTEN CHICKENS. 



The following is the formula of a 
large New England feeder for fatten- 
ing chickens: 

Take equal parts of oat meal, gra- 
ham flour, and corn meal, and for 
every hundred pounds of the dry feed 
add six pounds of brown sugar and 
three pounds of tallow. Mix with 
buttermilk or sour milk so it will 
pour out of a pitcher. After each 
meal mix milk and the dry feed for 
the next meal. Put in three ounces 
of soda for every hundred head of 
chickens. The soda sweetens the 
mixture and makes it light and palata- 
ble for the fowls. I use this ration 
for my capons every year and can 
recommend it. Do not fail to keep 
plenty of charcoal and grit before the 
chickens. Keep them away from 
a day at regular hours. I feed at 9 and 
noise and excitement and feed twice 
4 o'clock and never feed except when 
cooped. 



Some breeders say that a cross sow 
makes the best mother, but it is a 
statement without proof. 

o 

Remember that overfatness in a 
sire may hide many defects. 



Saturday, January 4, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



RAISING MULES. 



This is one of the questions which 
is perplexing to a number of our 
farmers as a great many prefer 
raising mules to horses, but, it seems 
they know more about the horses and 
how to attend to them to get the best 
results, while they have had very lit- 
tle experience with raising mules. 

In the first place to obtain the best 
success in raising good mules, a man 
should select mares that have a strain 
of good blood and of fair size. "The 
best sized mares are from 1100 to 1300 
pounds." With a good sire this grade 
of mares are best for the following 
reasons: The mare generally has good 
life, which has a tendency to produce 
a mule with his head up, and this 
sized mares have proven to produce 
mules that weigh from 1100 to 1500 
pounds, with lots of style, which com- 
mand the best prices in the market. 
Bigger mares produce well but if the 
mare is large she is nearly always 
lubberly. No one wants clumsy, lazy 
mules. The upheadedness is not as a 
rule obtained from the jack; however, 
in selecting a jack a man doesn't at 
any time want a dead head. The 
jack should be black with white 
points, of good size, with a good dis- 
position. The disposition should be 
taken largely into consideration. 

The best time to breed your mares 
is April, May or June; this brings the 
colt when the grass is green and the 
sun is warm. The mare needs grass 
to suckle the colt. She gives lots of 
milk on this feed, which strengthens 
the colt and makes him stretch in the 
sun and exercise lots. As soon as he 
begins to eat, which is generally at 
three or four months old, give him a 
little chopped feed and fix a trough 
in his pasture where he can get it at 
any time. Keep him away from the 
mare during the day, after he is four 
months old and when you come to 
wean him he will eat, thrive and con- 
tinue to grow. He should be weaned 
at six months old, and if he has learn- 
ed to eat well the thing from this 
time on is to give him a good pasture 
with plenty of good water and chop- 
pedfeed in his trough all the time. 

The secret of mule raising is to 
keep them growing and feed, exercise 
and sunshine will make them mature. 

Here is an instance which happened 
the past summer. One man had a 
mare weighing 1040 pounds which 
foaled a mule colt the last of April. 
This colt was allowed to run in pas- 
ture with its mother every night and 
was given all it would eat. The owner 
sold this colt for $135 when the colt 
was six months old. Another man 
owned two mule colts, both foaled in 
May, from mares weighing 1100 and 
1200 pounds each. These mares were 
kept on dry feed all the time they 
were suckling these colts and he sold 
the mules for $65 each in October. 

The care has very much to do with 
the outcome of your colts. During the 
breeding season care should be taken 
to see that the mare is returned and 
tried on the 18th to 21st day after she 
is bred and should she prove not to 
be in season try her again the 27th 
day from service and you will find it 
will add to your stock of colts the 
next spring. 

Persistence is the secret of success. 
A good way to get a man to try his 
mare is to require a few dollars de- 
posit at the time of the first service, 
then, if he forgets he has a mare, he 
will wonder what has become of that 
five or ten-dollar gold piece that he 
had hoarded away in his pocket, and 
when he remembers that' he has a 
mare he will get busy and take the 
mare to be tried. I have tried this 
system, and it is surprising how well 
they remember and the result is that 
my jacks have 85 per cent of mares 
with foal. 

No man can have good success in 
breeding an animal, "no matter how 
good care he gives that animal," un- 
less the mare owner takes care of her 
also, and the person who takes good 
care of his mares has the most to 
gain. Should she go over a season 
without a colt, her owner has lost 
from $50 to $100 and the country is 
no better off because he owned a 
mare. — A. H. Hotchkins. 

o 

Slops may make fat, but we prefer 
bacon that is built on clean grain and 
grasses. 



Fairmont Hotel 

Management of 

Palace Hotel Co. 

A Guarantee of Excellence 



The only large hotel commanding 
a view of our incomparable bay. 
The best located liotel In the 
world, as it is the most convenient 
to the business centers, while its 
elevation affords wholesome ad- 
vantages in the way of pure air, 
sunshine and the absence of all 
annoyances connected with the 
rebuilding of a great city. 

■:■ EUROPEAN PLAN ■:• 

Rates, single: $2.50, $3, $4, $5, 

$6, $7, $8. 
Suites: $10, $12, $14, $16, $18, $20 
.EVERY ROOM WITH BATH. 

Music a feature at Dinner and 
in the Foyer, evenings. 
Address 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



STALLION CARDS 



Folders, Pesters and Pamphlets 
Compiled and Printed. 

PEDIGREES 
TABULATED 

Giving Performances of the get of 
sires and dams. Typewritten, 
ready to frame. 

STALLION SERVICE 

BOOKS, $1.00 

With index and blank notes for ser 
vice fee. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco, Ca 1 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY. 

526 California Street. 



For the half year ending December 
31, 1907, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and eight-tenths 
(3 8-10) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Thursday, January 2, 1908. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1908. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

FAST FACES FOR SALE. 



Seymow M. 2:23 by Diawood, dam 
Nancy H. by Upstart. Brown horse, 
six years old, absolutely sound and 
good mannered. Stands 15% hands 
high, weighs close to 1100 pounds. Was 
timed separately a mile at I'leasnnton 
in the 2:20 pace in 2:12, heat won by 
Inferlotta in 2:0714. He has been a 
half mile in 1:03% to Miller cart and 
quarters in 30 seconds. For price and 
further particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davisville, Cal. 



TWO PACING STALLION COLTS 
WANTED. 

A yearling or two-year-old by Star 
Pointer and one by Zombro. Must be 
good color, natural pacers. standard 
bred and registered, or eligible to regis- 
tration. Bay or brown, little or no 
white, of good size, neat heads, not too 
high on leg, standing and traveling 
square on their feet. Mvist have 
plenty of knee and hock action. Must 
be absolutely sound and out of good 
mares. Address giving price, pedigree 
and full particulars as to speed, if 
worked, etc., F. W. KELLEY, Breeder 
and Sportsman, 616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco. 

WANTED 
TROTTING BRED STALLION. 

A trotting bred Stallion, standard- 
bred preferred. Send breeding, descrip- 
tion and all particulars, also very 
lowest cash price to 

F. O. BOX 1011, 
Phoenix. Arizona. 

FOR SALE — SETTER PUPS, 

Pedigreed English Setter Pups, two 
months old. Address 

M. FERRY, 
454 West Santa Clara St., San Jose. 



Gomhault's 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest and Surest 

4) Veterinary Remedy 0E 

HAS IMITATORS BUT NO COMPETITORS! 



SAFE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE. 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SKIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SWEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL, 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We guarantee that one tnblespoonfu! of Caustlo 
Balsam will produce more actual re nits than a whole 
bottle of any liniment or Epa\ in mixture ever made 
Every bottle sold ia warranted to give satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the most promt 
nent horsemen say of It. 1 < icp, 101.50 per bottle. 
Sold hy druggists, or Bent by ■ pi i ■, charges paid, 
with full directions for its use. 

The Accepted Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliable. 

Sure In Results. 




SbUJhqporicrt X-Proprirtors farVtf I _, r ., r , - 
^u.S.& Canadas. J CLEVELAND, 



NOTHING BTTT GOOD TtFSFI.TS 

Have used GOMI1AULTS CAUSTIC BALSAM for more 
I than 20yejr«. It is the best blister I have e\ ir tried, I have 
led it in hundred, oi case, with best results. Hl.rer- 
c ly nafe tor the most inexperienced person to use. This 
the largest breed, n,j establishment of trotting horse, in 
■ live world, and use your blister often. -W. II. I! IV imxil, 
|1 rop. Belmont Park Slock Farm, Belmont Puik, Mont 



TJSKD 10 YKARS SFrCFSSFFT.T.Y. 

Ilbaveuscd OOMBAUIT'S CAUSTIC BALSAM for tea I 
years ; have been very successful in curing curb .ringbone, 
capped hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism, and al- 
most every cause of lameness in horses Have astableof | 
forty head, mostly track and speedway horses, and cer- . 
tainly can recommend it.— C. C. CRAM KB, Trainlog 
Stables. 990 Jennings Street, New York City. 



Sole Agents for the United States and Canada. 

The Lawrence-Wiitiams Co. 

TORONTO, ONT. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 




TOM DILLON 



-Agent for- 



John B. Stetson's Hats 



Orders filled by mall. 

Van Ness Ave. & McAllister St., 
San Francisco. 



John Barilnhn, formerly of the Thnrlow 
Block 

John Kavanagh, formerly of the Palace 



lintel 



Kavanagh & Barduhn 

Merchant Tailors 

1124 Golden Gate Avenue, 
Between Buchanan and Webster Sts., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

N. W. Corner California and Mont- 
gomery Streets. 

For the half year ending December 
31st. 1!)II7, ;i dividend has been declared 
at the rates per annum of four and 
one-tenth (4 1-10) per cent on term de- 
posits and three and three-fourths 
(3%) per cent on ordinary deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after 
Thursday, January 2d, 1908. 

Depositors are entitled to draw their 
dividends at any time during the suc- 
ceeding half year. A dividend not 
drattm will be added to the deposit ac- 
count, become! ;i part thereof and earn 
dividend from January 1st. 

LOVF.M, WHITE, Cashier. 



WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

1155 Golden Gate Ave. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— In — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 



RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof. Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON k CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PETER SAXE & SON, 613 S2d street. 
Oakland Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers foi past thirty years All varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses, Sheep. Hoes. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence so 
Melted 



COLLI E AND BLOODHOUND PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. 



Best bred Young Stock on the Coast. 
Sires and Dams winners on the Bench 
and Workers in the Field. Address 
T. S. GRIFFITH, 
Glen Tana Collie Kennels, 
Spokane, Wash. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 In One" 
on your razor strop till ri 
leather becomes soft and M 
pliable ; draw razor blade jj 
, Between thumb and finger 11 
■ ~ moistened with "1 In One"; Ijj 
"> then strop. The razor cuts 
* 5 times as easy and clean; 

holds the edge longer. "A 
v Razor Saver for Every 
^■S* Shaver" which gives the 
scientific reasons, and a i 
y generous trial bottle jest J 
, free. Write to-day. 
G. W. COLE CO. 
102 New St., 
(lew York. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



T Saturday, January 4. 1908. 




From a One-Time Owner of the 
GREAT ANGUS POINTER 

Columbus. Ohio, Oct. 2, 1907. 

My horse. Gold Hal 2:12%, in his 
second race was in a bad mix-up. Two 
pacers were down and he jumped into 
the pile, injuring both his fetlocks. 
Both shin and knee boots were torn off, 
also his support and both tires. A 
broken brace punctured one of the fet- 
locks, and he went dead lame. We re- 
sorted to your remedy and he stepped 
a couple of miles to-day better than 
2:10 in his work. 1 consider that it 
has done wonders in this case. 

The duty counts so that I will, if pos- 
sible, take some home with me. Mv 
home address is Carleton Place, On- 
tario, Canada. I am the party who 
bought Angus Pointer 2:01% when he 
was a yearling, developed him. getting 
him a record of 2:06 before selling him 
tn I". G. Jones of Memphis, Tenn. 
Would like you to write me, quoting 
trade price. Address care of H. W. 
Wilson, Secretary K. T. H. B. A., Lex- 
ington. Ky. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. MACPHERSON. 



Is a Steed Bred to the Purple More 
Valuable Than a Mongrel? 

Are Not Diamonds More Valuable 
Than Paste? 

Then this vital fact stands out as 
clear as crystal, "Save-the-Horse" is 
worth its weight in gold. No other 
agency, remedy or method can ac- 
complish such miraculous and unfail- 
ing results. It saves time and money. 

MAKES A TENDON LIKE A ROD 
OF STEEL. 
"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
Bone and Bog Spavin, Ringbone (ex- 
cept low Ringbone), Curb, Thoroughpin, 
Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind Puff. Injured 
Tendons and all lameness, without scar 
or loss of hair. Horse may work as 
usual. 

$5.00 Per Bottle, with a written guar- 
antee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make it. Send for 
a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. T. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



W. HIGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office With E. Stewart & Co., 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 

HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs 

Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Nilea 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS '-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co., San 
Mateo. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers In PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St.. San Francisco, Cal.. 
Blake. Moffitt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland, Oregon. 

DISSOLUTION OP PARTNERSHIP. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 12, 1907. 
The H. D. Cowles Co., otherwise known 
as the Cowles-Payne Co., a partnership. 
Is this day dissolved. 1 will not be re- 
sponsible for any debts contracted from 
this date on account of the above named 
partnership. 

C. S. PAYNE. 



POR SALE. 



A perfectly matched driving team, 
mare and gelding, six and seven years, 
dark bays, city broke, and excellent driv- 
ers. Full brother and sister, sired by 
Silas Skinner, dam a well bred mare. 
Handsome and good travelers. For fur- 
ther particulars and price, address 
D. J. p., 
Breeder & Sportsman Office. 



Racing ! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Race Track 

OPENING DAY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 

Races Commence at 1:40 P. M., Sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 
20 minutes until 1:40 P. M. No 
smoking in the last two cars, which 
are reserved for ladies and their 
escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 

A number of good mares, geldings, 
colts and fillies by such sires as McKin- 
ney, Searchlight, Lecco, James Madison, 
Daedalion, Morengo King and Bonnie 
McKinney. Good individuals, all kind 
and gentle. For further information 
and to see the horses apply to 
K. BUSING, 
Race Track, Alameda, Cal. 



IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER, West Orange. N. J 




ABSo 



RBINE 



Removes Bursal Knlarccnients, 
Tbickenod Tissues, lufilt r-iti-il 
I arts, and any I'uif or Si\ell : ng 
Lures Lameness, Allays Pain 
without tying the horse tin. Docs not 
blister, slain or remove ti„. hair. jr>.w> a 
bottle, deli vered . Pamphlet 1-c free. 

AliSORHINK, .JR., for mankind, pi.no 
Dottle. Cures Synovitis, Weeping Sinew, 
strains, Couty or Rheumatic Deposits! 
reduces Varicose Veins, Varicocele. Hydrocele! 
Allays pain. Hook free. Genuine nifd. only by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

54 Monmouth St. Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.: Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; P. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

THE SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
101 Montgomery St., Cor. Sutter 

has declared a dividend for the term 
ending December 31, 1907, at the rate 
of three and eight-tenths (3 8-10) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, and payable on and after 
Thursday. January 2, 1908. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear 
the same rate of interest as principal. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Cashier. 



STAM B. FILLY POR SALE. 

fV coming three-year-old, entered and 
paid up on in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
and Stanford Stakes, sired by Stam B. 
2:11%, dam Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%; 
second dam Flora H., dam of Thomp- 
son 2:141,4. and Bonetti (trial 2:14%); 
third and fourth dams by producing 
sires. Is now in Henry Helman's string 
at Pleasanton, where she can be seen. 
Trotted a mile in 2:50 as a two-vear-old. 
An excellent prospect. For further par- 
ticulars address henry hahn, 2125 
Buena Vista Ave., Alameda. 



^ C0PAIB A 

£0 



1 



CAPSULES 



O 
Z 
0) 



Indiana and Ohio 



Paid up Capital $100,000.00 



LIVESTOCK INSURANCE CO. 

Insures HORSES, MULES and CATTLE Against Death From Any Cause 

«1 flD 000 Of) Approved Bonds Deposited With the Auditor of State 
* • " • " of Indiana for the Protection of all Policy Holders. 

(J. E. VAN CAMP, State Agent.) 

For Application Blanks and Information Address 

ARTHUR WOLF & CO., Resident Managers, 

321 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 
SMITH DOURSON & CO, City Agents. 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars.) 
Best located and healthiest stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster 
on hand for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park 
roadsters and prepare horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable 
«nd not have their horses frightened by aulos or cars 

WRITE BREEZE. HE'S THE DOCTOR. 

TELL HIM YOUR CARBURETER TROUBLES. 

If vour Gas Engine, whether it is in. an automobile or boat, does not run to 
suit you GET A TEXT BOOK SENT FREE. 

Agents: 

New York — Breeze Carbureter Co., 101 W. 66th St. Philadelphia — Rittenhouse 
Garage, 214 So. 23d St. Toronto. Ontario, Can. — E. R. McKinlay, 16 
Seaforth Ave. Chicago — Thos. H. McNevin, 70 La Salle St. 
Boston — V. J. Jacobs, 46 Columbus Ave. 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYW H ERE— BIG THING. 
Our Terms are Right. Our Goods are Right. There's Money In It. 

BREEZE CARBURETER CO, 

280 Halsey St, Newark, N. J. 




TALLION OWNER 



If In need of anything in the lino of Stallion Cards cnmplli<d and 
printed. Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse I nuk,, 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock and made from photo*, 
Hoof Pads of all kinds for road or track, l'.reedlng Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports. Pn enators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : ; 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
ivho values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your groeers or dealers 
for it. Positively euros ( olic. Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co, C. P. Kertel,' Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St, Oakland. Cal. 



THREE HIGH CLASS HORSES FOR 
SALE TO CLOSE AN ESTATE. 



No. 1. Seal brown gelding, five years 
old, stands 16 hands, weighs 1,150 
pounds. Sired by Direct 2:05V4, dam 
by Guy Wilkes 2:12', 4; second dam by 
Chas. Derby 2:20. This horse has never 
been trained, but is a fine driving horse 
and can trot a 2:40 gait. He is in every 
respect a very handsome and desirable 
animal, in first-class condition, very 
kind and gentle. 

No. 2. Bay filly coming three years 
old, stands 16.1 hands, is a trotter. Sired 
by Greco B. 2:1 2 H. dam by Poscora 
Hayward; second dam by Williamson's 
Belmont. She Is a remarkably fine filly, 
gentle and kind, has been broken but 
four weeks, and think she can show a 
three-minute gait. 

No. 3. Bay gelding, coming three 
years old, natural pacer. Sired by Wil- 
liam Harold 2:13 , / 4; first dam by Luster 
2:22; second dam by Richard's Elector 
2170; third dam by Chieftain 721; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont; fifth 
dam by imported Langford. Has been 
broken but two months, and shows 
great natural speed. Stands 15.3 hands, 
weighs 1,075 pounds. Is developed like 
a four or five-year-old. Very handsome 
and in first-class ' condition. A real 
show horse, with the kindest disposi- 
tion and every promise to become a 
great race horse. 

None of these horses wear boots or 
st nips. They are not afraid of any- 
thing on the road, and I will guarantee 
each one to be sound and without 
blemish. For particulars address or 
apply to 

H. OLSEN. 
814 B St., Haywards, Cal. 



FIVE CHOICE HORSES FOR SALE. 

Bay gelding (3) by Searchlight, out 
of La Muscovita, the dam of Yolanda 
2:14(4. This colt is a nice big fellow, 
16 hands, and can trot a 2:30 clip. 

Bay gelding (2) by Stam B. 2:11, out 
of same dam; a very handsome colt, that 
can beat a three-minute gait. 

Bay gelding (3) by Searchlight 
2:03V4, out of mare by Director 2:17, 
that will learn to pace fast. 

Billy B. (trial 2:13), brown gelding, 
by a son of Button, 16 hands, weighing 
lino pounds; a very nice horse. 

Auget Baron (trial 2:15). 

All of tli^se horses are sound, thor- 
oughly broke, in splendid condition, and 
can be seen at Pleasanton race track. 

re there of G. H. farmer, or 
JOHN GREEN, 1918 Steiner St, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



j Jul* t Enovglv| 

and lust as they want it. The right way to 
salt animals is to let them help themselves. 

Compressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

In our Patent Feeders, supply refined dairy salt. 
They mean animal tnrirc They cost but little. 
, Convenient for you and your 

I I * if^T J anf male suffer no neglect. Ark , 

'J " your dealer and write us for I 

booklet. 
Be I mom 
Stable 
Supply Co. j 

PftUoUe*. M fr» 
Brooklyn. 
N. V. 



Saturday, January 4, 190S.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Wonderful Work 





Shot at. 


Broke. 


Average 


W. R. Crosbv 


2350 


2295 


97.66 


J. M. Hawkins 


2350 


2289 


97.40 


J. R. Taylor 


2350 


2277 


96.89 


Fred Gilbert 


2350 


2250 


95.78 


Lee R. Barklev. . . 


2350 


2242 


95.45 


Total Shot at. . 


. 11,750 Total 


Broken . . 


. 11,353 



A Squad Average of 96.62 per cent 



This remarkable record was made by the above squad of 
five men, October 29-November 22 inclusive, 
the entire squad using- 

Dupont Smokeless 

The Powder that Makes and Breaks Records. 



E. L DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



GOLCHER BROS., 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



9 
9 
9 
9 

? 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

I 

9 
9 

; 

9 
9 

2 Telephone 
4 Temporary 1883 
C 



GUNS 

FISHING TACKLE 
AMMUNITION 
SPORTING GOODS 




511 Market St., 



San Francisco | 



General Watts 2:09Vi, World's Champion three-year-old 
stallion by 



"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:15% 

And winner of American Horse Breeder Futurity. It pays to 
book to such a sire. 

when writing kindly The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

mention this journal r * 



Take It In Time, 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of -Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WindpufTs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 

Ithaa saved thounainlH of (rood horses from the peddler'a 
cart and the broken-flown hor«e market. Mr. C I*. Plclc- 
I eng. of Minneapolis. Minn., who conducts one of 'tlm largest livery •tablet in the . Northwost 
writes aefollows: I have been using Qulnn's iOlnlm.nl lor sorne time ami wl I. the £"••<«;»« , 
itakonleaBiiieinreroniinendlnk'lttoniyfriends. No horseman should be with-' 
out I t in hi TSSSh I Vo, • 'Sri,,. Wllnts, spavin, wlndpulf, and all bunches it has no e,.ml.» 
> Price* 1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mall. Write us for circulars, 

?%?£&A! ent W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, H. Y. 



Send Entries at Once 

TO OUR 

Combination Sale 

TO BE HELD 

FEBRUARY 10TH, 1908. 
We will receive Entries for this 
Sale up to January 10th, and limit 
the number to Fifty Horses. 
FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



The Coney Island Jockey Club 

Race Course: Sheepshead Bay, New York 
Office: Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave. 
New York 



To Close Wednesday, January 15th, 1908. 

The Coney Island 
Jockey Club Stakes $25,000 

For the June Meeting, 1908 



For Three Years Old. — By subscription of $25 each, 
to accompany the nomination; $250 additional to start. 
Guaranteed Cash Value $25,000, of which $3,000 to the sec- 
ond, and $2,000 to the third. Should the winner of this 
stake also win the Tidal and The Lawrence Realization 
Stakes, The Coney Island Jockey Club will give an addi- 
tional $10,000 to such horse winning the three events. 
Weights: Colts 126 lbs., Geldings 123 lbs., Fillies 121 lbs.; 
winners of three races exclusively for three years old of 
the value of $5,000 each, or of one of the value of $15,000, 
to carry 3 lbs. extra. Non-winners of a race exclusively for 
three years old of the value of $5,000 allowed 7 lbs.; of 
$3,000 allowed 10 lbs. ONE MILE AND A HALF. 



Entries to be addressed to the ( !lerk of the < Jourse, 
THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB, 

Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., New York. 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIC 
IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



For GAM, BACKS and SHOULDERS, 
I'KIU'PKH SOUKS an. I SADDLE GALLS 
tliere Is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 
USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS. CALKS, 
SCRATCHES, Hloo.l 1'olsoncd SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN It has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning:. We placed It on the market 
relying wholly on Its merit for success. 
The sales of 1906 were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Call Remedy preceding that year. This 
increase was entirely due to Its MERITS, 
and It is THE CALL REMEDY OF THE 
20th CENTURY. 

It Is quick and sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
Which injure and often lay up race 
horses. 

Guaranteed under the rood and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1919. 

All Trainers Should Keep it in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00 

(Road our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next Issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois 
Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them 
to write any Jobber for it. 



IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



FOR 

HARNESS & SHOULDER GALLS. BARBED WIRE CUTS.J 
CALKS, SCRATCHES AND OTHER £>■ 
p AILMENTS OF THE SKIN. 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 4, 1908. 



The Best Horse Boots 





Tlie Gun for Ducks 



J temington . 



as well as other wild fowl is the Remington Autoloading 
Shotgun. No "kick" means Increased pleasure, the solid 
breech means absolute safety, tho sinerle barrel means ease 
in handling. You can afford this modern gun, which secures 
comfort for the shooter because it lists at the moderate 
price of $40, subject to dealers' discount. 

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Ilion, N. Y. 
Agency: 315 Broadway, New York City. 



SHOT GUN 





"LOOK FOR THE BIG RED W" 

THE big red VV is * ne connecting link between the consumer and the makers of Winchester goods. Over a 
year ago we adopted this safe-guarding trade-mark and since that time every box, carton and package 
put out by us has borne the big red \/\/, the hall-mark of goods as perfect as brains, experience and inge- 
nuity, coupled with a modern and complete plant, can make them. Our object in adopting this trade-mark 
was to make it easy to distinguish Winchester goods from other makes, which equal them neither in quality nor 
reputation, and thus protect you and protect ourselves. We have done our part. Will you do yours by looking 
for the big red \fl whenever buying anything in our line? The big red W is to guns, cartridges and loaded shells 
what the word "Sterling" is to silverware the world over. For your own protection we again ask you to 
"Look for the big red W" 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 





NEW TH 



Our 1907 New Model Three Bolted Gun embodies all of the requisite 
qualities of a perfect gun — safety, strength, durability, superior shoot- 
ing qualities, beautiful lines, nice balance, and in oi.r high grade guns 
very fine finish and richness of ornamentation. See cut No. 7 $300 list 
gun shown above — special price $213.75, ejector $10 extra We guarantee 
the three bolts to hold the gun tight for all time and not allow the gun 
to fly open in discharging. We guarantee the coil main springs forever 
against breaks and miss-fires. 

Send for 1907 Art Catalog describing improvements and special prices 
on eighteen grades $17.75 net to $300 list. 



ITHACA GUN CO., Dept. 15 ITHACA, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Branch: Phil B. Bekeart Co., 717 Market St., San Francisco 



Ask the Man 



Who owns a PARKER GUN why he would rather 
have it than any other Gun on the market — Then 
You'll Know why the PARKER is the Gun You 

want. 



PARKER BROS., meriden, conn. 



(Catalogue on Application) 
NEW YORK OFFICE, 
32 Warren Street 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



DID YOU EVER HEAR OF AN 
OFFER LIKE THIS? 

Useful and Beautiful 

No other firm could offer this 
but us. 

This is the first time we have 
ever made this offer — this beauti- 
ful four-piece set of Silverware 
(guaranteed), full size for family 
use, packed in case. 

For Only 97c 



It is done solely to advertise our product and only one 
set will be sent to each family, with positively no duplicate or- 
ders. The plate is heavy and the pattern one of the latest and 
most fashionable — the famous "Rose." The pieces are 
FIT TO GRACE ANY TABLE AND WILL LAST FOR YEARS 

ORDER TO-DAY 



This price includes all packing, shipping and de- 
livery charges prepaid to your door. Send cash, 
money order, or 2c stamps to Dept. E., 



Rogers Silverware Co., 



No. 114 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 SURPLUS $3,200,000 

The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the Are of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in Are and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

t 
f 
* 
* 

t 

Tents, Hammocks, Awnings and Covers. Camping Outfits for Hunting ^ 

and Fishing Trips. + 

* 
* 



The ROSS McMAHON 
Awning and Tent Co. 



73 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. f 

Phone Temporary 2030. 



❖ 
* 




McMurray -- McMurray 

McMURRAY 

Sulkies and 
Jogging 
Carts 

Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 
prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 

McMurray - McMurray 



Four more In 2:16 have already been credited this season to 



"McKINNEY" 2:liy 4 



Making his wonderful list still more remarkable. 



So W » ri thu g jo3.The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The Stallion Number 



OF THE 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Will be issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and hoi-semen. 



If You Own a Stallion 

Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number will reach every man on the 
Coast who owns a good mare. 

If You Own a Mare 

You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
tain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 



If so. you will lie interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will be valuable and 
entertaining. 



In place of getting out the usual large Christmas 
number of the BREEDER and Sportsman last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February 15th was selected 
as Christmas comes too early for an issue of this descrip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wisli illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. AVrite 
for price and particulars. 



BREEDER AM) SPORTSMAN 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



MOVED DOWN TOWN 

The Breeder and Sportsman 



IS NOW LOCATED IN THE 

PACIFIC BUILDING 

OFFICES 363, 365 and 366 

Corner Market and Fourth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 Pacific Building, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Posto/fice. 

Terms— One Year J3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
nnmo and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 

LIBERAL FUTURITY STAKES are "the real 
thing" just at present with the turf journals pub- 
lished on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, 
and they have been engaged in a hot contest to 
see which could devise the most liberal terms and 
conditions, as a large list of entries is an absolute 
necessity toward the success of these newspaper 
Futurities, which, while of great benefit to the 
horse breeding industry, are also a great source of 
revenue to the newspapers offering them. The 
Western Horseman of Indianapolis inaugurated a 
stake some years ago with the financial assistance 
of several wealthy breeders, by which a person had 
only to subscribe for that journal to make his colt 
eligible to a stake worth $8,000. The American Horse 
Breeder of Boston announced a $10,000 Futurity last 
year which only called for an entry tee of one dol- 
lar to nominate in it. The Horse World of Buffalo 
inaugurated a stallion stake, the greater part of 
which was to be put up by the stallion owners, all 
foals by these stallions to be free of entry in said 
stake. The Horse Review of Chicago, which has 
given a very successful Futurity for years, in its 
Christmas number recently issued announced new 
and most liberal conditions, which enable a breeder 
on the payment of $2.50 subscription to the paper 
for one year to nominate in a $12,500 stake every 
mare he owned that was bred in 1907. This seemed 
to cap the climax of liberal stakes, but now comes 
the Chicago Horseman with a Futurity guaranteed 
to be worth $15,000, and any owner, on the payment 
of the insignificant sum of one dollar, is entitled to 
nominate every mare he owns. Entries to this stake 
will close Monday, March 2d, and the only pay- 
ments thereafter will be $5 November 2, 1908, on 
each foal (this payment to carry with it a year's 
subscription to the Horseman), and $5 May 1, 1909, 
on each foal. The only other payments are starting 
payments. As the Horseman guarantees the stake 
to be worth $15,000 and also guarantees that all 
money paid in in excess of this guarantee will be 
added to the stake, this Futurity Is beyond question 
the most liberal ever devised. All these stakes help 
the breeding business greatly and we hope each and 
every one of them will secure entry lists large 
enough to make them profitable to the journals 
giving them. 



THE SAUSALITO POOL ROOMS have been de- 
clared a nuisance by Judge Bush of Shasta, sitting 
on the Superior Court bench of Marin county. Dis- 
trict Attorney Boyd of Marin county had brought 
a civil suit to abolish the pool rooms of Frank 
Daroux and others as a public nuisance, and Judge 
Bush has sustained the complaint. The Judge says 
in his decision that such a business constitutes a 
nuisance in drawing together persons who annoy 
the neighborhood, endanger the public peace and 
corrupt good morals is without question. 



A GREAT CALIFORNIA TROTTER. 



THE LISTS OF ENTRIES for the Occident Stake, 
foals of 1907, has been received, and there are 
eighty-one entries, the largest list for several years. 
This list, together with the lists of those on which 
second and third payments were made January 1st 
in the stakes of 1908 and 1909, will be printed next 
week. 



A TEN-DOLLAR PAYMENT, the last until the 
starting payment, must be paid on or before Febru- 
ary 1st on all three-year-olds that are to be raced 
in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity this year. Make 
this payment or your colt will not be eligible to 
start in this rich stake. 



THE HOLIDAY NUMBERS of the Eastern jour- 
nals devoted to harness horse affairs are particu- 
larly fine this year. The Horse Review, Horseman, 
Horse World, Trotter and Pacer, American Horse 
Breeder, Bit and Spur, and Rider and Driver, all 
published beautifully illustrated editions. 



Secretary Stewart of the Los Angeles Driving 
Club will be kept busy this spring and summer, as 
the club will hold matinees twice a month. A great 
improvement which will- be made this year is the 
shortening of the program to five races during the 
afternoon, instead of trying to pull off seven or 
eight events and keeping the crowd until late in 
the evening. Some fast time will be made in these 
amateur races, as there are owned in the club 
two or three trotters and several pacers that can 
beat 2:10 almost any time they turn around. 



The colts by the Palo Alto bred and owned stallion 
McKena 39460 (McKinney-Helena 2:11%) are such 
fine lookers and show so much trotting action that 
many breeders will again send their mares to him. 
Mr. William Hendrickson owns some particularly 
fine colts by the horse and h;is them at Plcasanton. 



P. J. Williams owns a couple of stallions that 
breeders should patronize. Monterey 2:09% and his 
son Yosemite are both horses whose blood will 
benefit and improve the stock of any locality. They 
have size, good looks and great speed, as well as 
dispositions that are about perfect. 

o 

Bon Voyage (3) 2:12% is said to be in fine shape 
this year and will be well patronized by the Southern 
California breeders, although we understand Mr. 
Clark will have Gerrety put the great young horse 
in shape to reduce his record during the summer. 



From the reports of young pacers by Star Pointer 
being worked on Eastern and Soul hern tracks, it 
looks as though the old champions' 2:10 list would 
be doubled in 1908. He now has five in this list 
and they are all race horses. 



J. It. Fronefield is in Los Angeles this week in the 
interests of the Breeder and Sportsman, and will 
visit San Bernardino, Bakersfleld, Hanford, Tulare, 
Fresno and other points before returning to San 
Francisco. 



The subject of our illustration this week is the 
gelding Geo. G. 2:05%, called the best and fastest 
race trotter of 1907, as he not only won every one 
of his five starts and beat the best in his class, but 
afterwards lowered the world's half-mile record to 
2:06%, the quarters of which mile were 0:31%, 0:31, 
0:31% and 0:32%. 

George G. was bred by Frank Wickersham of 
Fresno and was sired by Homeward 2:13%, a son 
of Strath way. His dam was Mabel by Junio 2:22, 
son of Electioneer. Nothing much was thought of 
him when a colt and finally George Grandau pur- 
chased him for $50 and gave him to Josh Albertson 
to train, who discovered that the gelding had a 
great flight of speed and entered him through the 
California Circuit in 1903, where he won three out 
of four starts, not being called upon to do any- 
thing but educate himself a little in his first race. 
He took a mark of 2:12% that year, and the next 
summer was purchased by Mr. A. N. Brady of New 
York for $15,000. He was given to Ed Geers to 
race, and owing to indulging in breaks at the criti- 
cal moments, was called a gold brick, as he took 
a record of 2:06% and failed to win a race. The 
next year he worked better for Geers, but did not 
race much better, as he lowered his record to 2:05% 
without winning first money. In 1906 he was mati- 
need and won the Cleveland Challenge Cup and 
the Gold Cup at Pittsburg. In 1907 he went to the 
Blue Ribbon sale and to the surprise of everyone 
nearly there was very spirited bidding on him, and 
he was finally knocked down to his present owner, 
William Bradley, of New York, for $10,000. He was 
turned over to Alta McDonald, who has made a good 
actor out of him, as his unbeaten campaign last 
year proved. His first victory, says the Horseman, 
was at Poughkeepsie, where he defeated Turley, Oro, 
Lady Gail Hamilton and Kid Shea, leading from 
wire to wire each heat in 2:08% and 2:07. At 
Readville he trimmed Lillian R., the only time the 
bay mare was beaten all year, as well as Oro, John 
Caldwell and Kid Shea, in 2:06, 2:08 and 2:09%, the 
first heat being the trotting record for the year at 
the time. Although the track was slow, George G. 
could have trotted in 2:04 that day. He was idle the 
next two weeks, but at Syracuse jogged two miles 
in 2:07 and 2:07% to beat Oro and Lady Gail Ham- 
ilton, marching the last quarter of the first heat in 
0:31 and the last quarter of the second in 0:31%. 
His last starts of the year were at Columbus. Main- 
sheet 2:05 had been given a special preparation for 
the two events, and it was expected he would prove 
very troublesome; but at no time could he make 
George G. stretch ihs neck, the gelding winning the 
first in 2:06%, the last half in 1:02, the second In 
2:08%, the first half in 1:02%, the second quarter in 
0:31, and the third in 2:05%, the quarters being In 
0:32, 0:30%»0:30% and 0:30%. In his second race 
he won in 2:06%, 2:08 and 2:07%. The first half 
of the first heat was in 1:01%, the second quarter 
in 0:30% and the first in 0:31 and the last quarter 
of the third heat in 0:31. It is said that there is 
not a trotter in existence that can step a quarter in 
30 seconds as easily as he can, as he seems to be 
only jogging when doing it. 

The picture of George G. which appears on our 
first page this week was taken while he was at 
Oakland, just after the close of his first campaign 
in 1903. 

o 

Major P. P. Johnson of the National Trotting As- 
sociation has been appointed adjutant general on 
the staff of the Governor of Kentucky. 



Secretary Horace W. Wilson has announced Octo- 
ber 7th to 18th as the dates of the Lexington meet- 
ing of 1908. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



| NOTES AND NEWS f 

i i 

We've moved down town. 



Come and see us in the new office. 



It is now located in rooms 36:1-365-366, on the third 
door of the Pacific Building, corner Market and 
Fourth streets. 



Fly-by-Nlght, a pacer bred at the Haggin ranch, 
Sacramento, and a brother in blood to Anaconda 
2:01*4, is expected to take a record around 2:05 next 
year, if raced. He is owned in Chicago by A. W. 
Longley, who has been using him in matinees, and 
last August won a matinee race with him in 2:09%. 
Fly-by-Night is by Knight and out of a mare by 
Algona. 



President Ben P. Rush of the California State 
Agricultural Society was in town this week. He 
states that the Board of Directors will hold a meet- 
ing soon to select a date for the State Fair this 
year, and will consult with representatives of the 
Oregon State Fair, so that dates may be chosen that 
will give exhibitors an opportunity to show at both 
fairs. If the week of August 31st to September 5th 
is selected for the California Fair, the Oregon asso- 
ciation will select September 14th to 19th inclusive, 
as its dates, thus allowing a full week between the 
close at Sacramento and the opening at Salem, giv- 
ing a full week in which to ship exhibits from here 
to the Oregon Fair. An appropriation of $50,000 
is available for the construction of a pavilion at 
the California State Fair Grounds this year, and 
unless something that cannot now be forseeen should 
occur, the entire live stock and pavilion exhibit will 
be held this year in one enclosure. 



John Quinn is booking mares to Greco B. every 
day, and the stallion is attracting lots of attention 
at the Sacramento track. This son of McKinney 
and Alien by Anteeo is in fine shape and his pros- 
pects for a big season are excellent. The fact that 
Greco B.'s grandam is the dam of Lou Dillon makes 
him one of the most remarkably bred horses in the 
country. 



John Quinn of Sacramento has recently added to 
his string a filly by The Bondsman, out of a mare 
by Allerton, that is a fine going filly and has a 
mark of 2:30 as a two-year-old. She is now a three- 
year-old. 



The Solano county horsemen have organized an 
association and will hold harness race meetings on 
the half-mile track, northwest of town, which was 
built some years ago by Mr. Peyton. The track can 
be made an excellent one for both training and rac- 
ing, and as there are a large number of well bred 
horses owned in that section, meetings can be held 
which will draw large crowds and be popular. Haile 
& Rush, owners of the stallion Demonio 2:11%, will 
add $L0 each to stakes for two and three-year-olds, 
to be trotted and paced each year. These races 
will probably be held in the spring. Mr. Connolly, 
the liveryman of Suisun, has secured a lease of the 
Peyton track, and will see that it is kept in good 
shape for training the year round. Mannie Reams 
will have charge of the track and will train a string 
of colts and horses there. Mr. Reams is an excel- 
lent colt trainer. 



S. Christenson of this city has purchased from 
Mrs. Lucille Jones of Goldfield, Nevada, the mare 
Marguerite K. by Dom Pedro, formerly owned by 
Chas. F. Kapp, also a five-year-old gelding by I. 
Direct 2:12%, and a yearling by Zolock 2:05%, both 
out of Marguerite K., and the mare is now in foal 
to Bon Voyage 2:12%. This mare's two-year-old by 
St am B. 2:11% showed very fast, and trotted a 
mile in 2:29% in its work, but unfortunately, died. 
Marguerite K. is a pacer and appeared in several 
matinee events eight or nine years ago, before be- 
ing put to breeding, and showed very fast. She 
won a matinee race in 2:17, but has no record. 



It will not be long before some stallion will have 
a list of 200 standard performers, and the close of 
the present year should bring this about. Onward 
2:25% now has 198 to his credit and Gambetta 
Wilkes has 197; Allerton 2:09% has *78 and Red 
Wilkes 177. 



Don't fail to breed your mare to a good stallion 
this year just because you think she is too old. 
Medium's Last was just seventeen when she foaled 
the roan colt in 1905 that took a two-year-old record 
of 2:12% in 1907, and is known as Trampfast. Re- 
member the old saying among horsemen: "Blood 
will tell; age don't count." 



The world's race record is 2:00% and was made 
by Star Pointer in 1897 at the Illinois State Fair. 
Anyone who wants to see the champion race horse 
can find old Star Pointer looking like a two-year-old 
in Charley De Ryder's stable at Pleasanton. The 
oldest Star Pointer colts foaled in California are 
now yearlings, and they are hard to buy now and 
will be hard to beat later on. 



Enterprising owners of racing stables should pro- 
vide their trainers and grooms with neat jackets 
and caps to wear on the track during the races 
and where owners are not enterprising enough to 
do this, associations should provide the jackets and 
insist on them being worn. The, associations that 
make their meetings as attractive as possible will 
have the largest gate receipts. 



It is not too early to begin advertising your stal- 
lion. 



Thirty-six stallions have sired five or more trot- 
ters and pacers with records of 2:10 or better. 
Those in this list that are now in California are 
Diablo, Charles Derby, Steinway and Star Pointer. 
The remarkable thing about the first three of these 
four stallions is that they are son, sire and grand- 
sire respectively. Steinway 2:25% has six pacers 
in the 2:10 list, his son, Chas. Derby 2:20, has one 
trotter and five pacers in that list, and Chas. Derby's 
son, Diablo 2:09%, has seven pacers with records 
below 2:10. 



For several years the Russian trotting record stood 
at 2:11%, being held by Alvin Melodoi, a son of 
the ex-American stallion Alvin 2:11. During the past 
season the seven-year-old gray stallion Paluga, son . 
of the American bred stallion Haiio 2:23%, captured 
the honor reducing the former trotting record on 
two occasions, both performances being over the 
Moscow track, cutting it to 2:10% and later to 
2:0S%. Paluga also holds the ice record of 2:14 
as well as the two-mile record of 4:26%. Paluga's 
dam is an Orloff mare. 



The dispersal sale of the trotting and pacing stock 
remaining on the historic Forest City Farm, near 
Cleveland, Ohio, took place December 19th. It Was 
a miscellaneous lot of all ages that was offered and 
the average was about $200 on forty head. The 
best price was $640, paid for a two-year-old chestnut 
colt by Cresceus 2:02%. 



June 18th to 27th are the dates selected for the 
second annual International Horse Show at Olympia, 
London. The prizes will aggregate $50,000, not in- 
cluding the value of the championship cups. F. F. 
Euren, the English secretary of the show, was in 
this country a short time ago and stated then that 
he expected the representation of horses from the 
United States and Canada would be large. Mr. 
Euren has visited all the countries of continental 
Europe save Russia, and received promises of entries 
that should make the greatest horse show ever held. 
He will visit the land of the Czar this month and ex- 
pects to meet with hearty co-operation there. No- 
where in the history of horse shows has a prize 
list worth $50,000 been arranged, and at this time the 
prospects are that the greatest gathering of the kind 
on record will be held in the British metropolis next 
summer. Among the most valuable of the trophies 
to be won will be the $1,000 pieces of plate pre- 
sented by the King and Queen and the Prince of 
Wales. — Chicago Breeders Gazette. 



Will Durfee took a bay trotter around the Califor- 
nia Circuit last year that looked and acted like a 
free-for-all candidate, although he was green and 
has never raced. This trotter was called Regalo. 
and was by Irv. Mulholland's McKinney stallion 
Osito 2:13%. Regalo is a beautifully gaited trotter, 
one of the kind that has lots of knee and hock ac- 
tion and very attractive when in motion. Durfee 
drove him in 2:09 in a matinee race recently, and it 
is said three heats below 2:10 will not make Regalo 
stop trotting. 



Scott McCoy has opened a public training stable 
at Denver and will train the horses owned by 
Messrs. Geo. H. Estabrook and J. M. Herbert. 



Budd Doble has secured an interest in the three- 
year-old colt by Kinney Lou, out of Katinka 2:20% 
by Abbotsford, that was bred by Mr. A. L. Reed 
of this city. This is the colt that was foaled in 
a car while its dam was being shipped to San Jose, 
and is a fast stepper at the trotting gait. It is a 
very handsome colt. In fact, we have yet to hear 
of a Kinney Lou that isn't. 



Saturday, February 15th, is the date when the 
Breeder and Sportsman's stallion number will be 
issued. Every breeder should secure a copy of it, 
as it will be a directory of all the leading stallions 
on the Coast. 



Anyone wanting a perfectly matched pair of dark 
bay horses, mare and gelding, six and seven years 
old, city broke and excellent drivers should write 
to D. J. F., this office, and ask where this team 
can be seen. A long price is not asked for them, and 
they will be sold worth the money. 



The annual meeting of the Tennessee Fair and 
Racing Circuit was held at Nashville on the 17th 
of last month, and dates for eight meetings on the 
circuit were allotted. Wouldn't it be pleasant to 
hear of a California Circuit for 1908 being arranged 
that early. If it were done all the owners "from 
Siskiyou to San Diego and from the Sierras to the 
sea" would have their horses in training by March 
1st. 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. is you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



Los Angeles Driving Club will hold a matinee this 
afternoon, and some extra fast time is expected to 
be made. 



With ordinary good luck there will be a youngster 
by Coronado 2:09% in Australia some time this 
spring. Among the mares purchased by Mr. Andrew 
Robertson of Melbourne, who took twenty-one head 
to Australia last week, was the mare Directess by 
Direct 2:05%, out of Dusk, dam of Fallacy 2:17%, 
by Mambrino Wilkes, second dam the thoroughbred 
man Centennial Belle, dam of Clipper 2:06, by 
Woodburn, third dam Bonnie Belle by Williamson's 
Belmont. Directess was safe in foal to Coronado 
2:09% when shipped, and it is to be hoped she will 
make the trip in good shape and that the foal will 
arrive all right in due time, as Coronado is surely 
destined to be one of McKinney's greatest producing 
sons, and the Australians are entitled to the best 
we have for export in America, as they are doing 
excellent work in building up the sport of harness 
racing on a good foundation. 



When Sam Norris bought Washington McKinney 
at the Chase December sale it was because he 
knew the get of the horse were only beginning to 
show their real worth. Frank Clark of Eugene. 
Oregon, reports a four-year-old filly by him to have 
shown a 2:10 clip at the trot. James Guerine of 
Lytton, Cal., has a slashing big three-year-old filly 
that has been a full mile in 2:20, pacing. Mrs. 
Farmer of Santa Rosa has a pair of geldings that 
are a fast pair of trotters, and others in the country 
have fast Washington McKinneys, while there are 
several in training at Pleasanton, among them Lady 
McKinney, that has been a mile in 2:12, with a half 
in 1:05%. 



Frank Turner of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm has 
a right to be proud of probably the biggest and best 
bred lot of weanling trotters produced on any one 
farm in the West in 1907. 



W. Y. Walker of Sebastopol owns a three-year-old 
filly by Cbas. Derby, out of a mare by Abbotsford 
Jr., that should fall into the hands of some good 
trainer this season, as with not much more work 
than to break her she brushed quarters in 34 sec- 
onds. 



Lotta 2:08% has been sold to European parties 
through John Splan. 



R. Consani. whose address is northeast corner of 
Grove and Laguna streets, San Francisco, has two 
good horses for sale, one a five-year-old gelding, the 
other a four-year-old filly. Both are well broke and 
pleasant drivers— $200 takes either. See advertise- 
ment for breeding, etc. 



Frank McGregor, owner of the filly Caroline by 
Robin, that he worked a mile in 2:17 as a three- 
year-old, has purchased the Fifth-street Livery 
Stable in Santa Rosa, and is now at a loss to decide 
whether to sell the filly and cease to be a sport, or 
to dispose of the livery stable in the spring and 
race the mare through the California Circuit. 



Mr. R. E. deB. Lopez of this city has a couple of 
two-year-olds by Kinney Lou 2:07% that are as 
swell lookers as one can find anywhere. Charley 
Morgan is handling them out on Eighth Avenue, this 
city. One is a bay filly out of Missie Madison by 
James Madison 2:17%, second dam Missie Medium 
by Rampart, third dam Belle Medium 2:20, the dam 
of Stam B. 2:11%. by Happy Medium. The other 
is a colt, and he is a chestnut. His dam is by Direct 
2:05%, second dam Kate Chapman by Naulmc. sire 
of the dam of Directly 2:03%, third dam by Geo. M. 
Patchen Jr. 31. 



Gen. Watts 2:06% won upwards of $20,000 last 
year as a three-year-old, but had he been able to 
trot in 2:00 he could not have won much had he 
not been entered in stakes. 



The Maddens, who have sold Siliko 2:06%, to go 
to Brighton, England, have a full brother in the 
stud in Kentucky in the three-year-old colt Kodides, 
that showed a workout mile at Columbus this year 
in 2:11 and a half in 1:06%. 



At Martin Carter's Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington. 
Cal., a filly that will not be two years old until 
March is showing more speed at the trot than any- 
thing of her age ever showed on this famous farm, 
where John A. McKerron 2:04%, Miss Georgie 
2:0S% and other fast ones first saw the light. This 
filly is by Lord Alwin. a pacing full brother to John 
A. McKerron 2:04%, and her dam is Excella by 
Monbells 2:23%, second dam Expressive (3) 2:12% 
by Electioneer, third dam the thoroughbred mare 
Esther, dam of four trotters in the list. Geo. Al- 
geo is now working the youngsters on Nutwood Stock 
Farm and finds there is a great deal of natural 
speed in all of them. Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% is 
looking like a two-year-old and is as vigorous as any 
young stallion. 



Mr. J. C. Grubb has returned to Los Angeles with 
his stallion Redlac 2:07% by Allerton 2:09%. and 
will place him in the stud there for the season of 
1908. 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



THE STORY OF FANNY WICKHAM. 



Facts Hitherto Unpublished Concerning the Breeding 
and Career of the Ancestress of a Remarkable 
Family of Light-Harness Race Horses. 

[William G. Layng in Christmas Horse Review.] 

While visiting Philadelphia a few months ago, 
I was calling upon William McFarland, the well- 
kno,wn horseman, relative to his pacing stallion 
Owyho 2:07%, when a tall, dignified gentleman 
came in and was introduced as Captain William 
McCloy. He became deeply interested in the photo- 
graphs of Owyho which Mr. MacFarland and I were 
looking at, and asked if we knew anything about 
Fanny Wickham, whose name appeared in Owyho's 
tabulated pedigree. As I had often heard of her 
during her career in California, I answered in the 
affirmative and added that she was bred in Virginia 
and was purchased by Frank S. Malone, of Sacra- 
mento. 

"Well, well, that is strange. You do not know how 
pleased I am to know this," he remarked, "for I 
have just come from my old home in Richmond, Va., 
and saw the stable in which Fanny Wickham was 
kept when I had her in charge; for I broke and 
drove her, and we had her (with the exception of 
about seven months), for over four years. Why, I 
now have in my home in Cressona, Scuykill county, 
a letter that I received from John Wickham, over 
thirty-five years ago, relative to Fanny; and, if you 
will allow me, I will send it to you, for I want the 
public to know what a great mare she was — not only 
as an individual, but on account of her breeding. 
She traced directly to the dam of Boston, the great- 
est race horse of his day, and he was bred, as you 
know, by Mr. Wickham. While I was in Richmond 
attending a meeting of the veterans of the 'late un- 
pleasantness,' a reunion of the men who wore the 
blue and those who, like myself, wore the gray, I 
tried to find some members of the Wickham family, 
but was disappointed. Nearly every one I knew in 
my boyhood days were dead and forgotten by all 
but those who enjoyed their hospitality and friend- 
ship nearly fifty years ago." 

* * * 

A few days after he brought me this well-preserved 
letter, but before going further regarding it, I will 
digress a little. In California, where I resided for 
over forty years, there lived, in my opinion, one of 
the most upright, as well as best posted, horsemen 
that ever drew a line over a trotter. That was the 
late Frank S. Malone. He had a large livery stable 
in Sacramento, which he started in the early 'fifties. 
Beside, he ran a number of stage lines, and was 
heavily interested in contracting work. He counted 
among his friends Senator Leland Stanford, Collis 
P. Huntington, Charles Crocker, Mark Hopkins, J. 
B. Haggin, D. O. Mills, and all the leading men in 
the Capitol city. Possessed of genial personality, 
and being a splendid conversationalist, he was high- 
ly esteemed by everyone. His memory was as keen 
as that of any person I ever saw, and he always had 
a fund of reminiscences of the men and horses of 
early days to draw from. His stable was headquar- 
ters for nearly all the good horses that arrived from 
their long transcontinental journey, which sometimes 
took six or eight months. St. Clair, Missouri Chief, 
Lou Hibbard, Buttermilk Sal, the Lou Mills mare, 
Miami, Skenandoah, Tecumseh, General Taylor, 
John Nelson, and others whose names I have for- 
gotten, were all in his care; but the one trotter, 
however, over which he used to enthuse was his 
chestnut mare, Fanny Wickham, "the greatest of 
them all!" he declared. 

The way in which he came to buy her was as fol- 
lows: He had been talking to Leland Stanford and 
J. G. McCracken (owner of McCracken's Black 
Hawk), about the stories he had heard of this won- 
derful mare, and he was convinced she was just the 
trotter needed to win some of the long distance 
events which at that time were so fashionable on 
the race tracks there. He was bound to own her, 
so he arranged his business affairs and started east, 
saw Fanny Wickham, bought her and shipped her 
to Sacramento. What her price was he never di- 
vulged. After being placed in a box stall in his 
stable every prominent horseman in the vicinity 
called to inspect her. One of them, called "Yankee" 
Smith, the leading reinsman there, said: "She's no 
trotter, Frank. She's a race horse. I'll bet she'll 
run as soon as you urge her." When she had tho- 
roughly recovered from her trip Mr. Malone invited 
Mr. Smith to ride behind her on the Riverside road, 
the only decent driveway near the city. She had 
not gone far before the latter said: "Frank, I 
want to take back all I said about her. She is one 
of the neatest, cleanest and gamest going trotters 
I ever sat behind. If she runs at all it will be on 
the trot." 

While being trained some months later she became 
lame and Mr. Malone bred her to a big, brown trot- 
ting horse called Niagara that had splendid trotting 
action and was very handsome. This horse's name 
appears in the pedigrees of Sonoma Girl 2:05% and 
Directum Kelly 2:08%. Fanny Wickham's foal was 
called Fanny Malone and was one of the handsomest 
and best trotters in Sacramento county. Mr. Malone 
moved to San Francisco, and as Mr. Harris Covey 
(also an old resident of Sacramento), had just taken 
charge ' of the Palo Alto Stock Farm for Governor 
Stanford, he was very solicitous about the stallion 
that Mr. Malone would breed his mare to. When 
Electioneer, Mohawk Chief, General Benton, and the 



consignment of mares from Charles Backman's farm 
in New York arrived at the "farm of the tall pine" 
in IS77. Frank Malone was one of the first to inspect 
them. As Governor Stanford at that time considered 
Mohawk Chief the best of the trio of stallions, he 
said he had no objection to breeding the others to 
any mares that his friends might send. So Mr. 
Malone sent Fanny Malone to be bred to Electioneer, 
as he deemed him the best of the lot. She was the 
first half-thoroughbred ever mated with this horse. 
Beside allowing Mr. Malone to breed Fanny, Gov- 
ernor Stanford granted the same privilege to Robt. 
Morrow (owner of St. Julien 2:11%), and his mare 
Stockton Maid produced Old Nick 2:23, by Elec- 
tioneer. A. Waldstein, of San Francisco, bred his 
mare Sister, by John Nelson, and got that great 
two-mile trotter, Albert W. 2:20, sire of Little Al- 
bert 2:10, and the following year she produced 
Nelly W., the dam of Waldstein 2:22%, both by 
Electioneer. J. G. McCracken, of Sacramento, had 
a gray mare called Nelie Patchen, by George M. 
Patches Jr. 2:27, which Governor Stanford often 
drove, and he prevailed upon her owner to send her 
to Palo Alto and breed her to Electioneer or General 
Benton. Mr. McCracken chose the latter, and the 
product, a colt called Tom Benton, became the sire 
of Mary Lou 2:17 (dam of Kinney Lou 2:07%), and 
several others. 

Becoming heavily interested in mining stocks and 
not having the time to devote to his horses, Mr. Ma- 
lone sold Fanny Malone, in 1879, to Samuel Gamble, 
and the folowing year he sold her two-year-old foal 
Katie G., by Electioneer, to the same buyer, who, at 
that time, was superintendent of the Cook Stock 
Farm, Danville, Cal. Mr. Gamble then sold them to 
his employers, Messrs. Seth and Daniel Cook. Fanny 
Malone produced two fillies by Steinway 2:25%, one 
was Zola, the dam of Maud C. 2:15, the other was 
Young Fanny Wickham, the dam of a very promis- 
ing black colt by Abbottsford 2:19, that belonged to 
Charley Harley, Esq., was taken east, as a four-year- 
old, and met with an accident, which checked his 
career. The bay mare Katie G. was bred to Stein- 
way 2:25%, and produced Klatawah, p, 2:05%, (hold- 
er of the world's record for three-year-olds) ; Wella- 
day, p, 2:14, Katrinka G. 2:14%, Charles Derby 2:20 
(sire of 35 in the 2:30 ist, including Don Derby, p, 
2: 04V 2 (sire of Castanada, p, 2:09%), Much Better, 
p, 2:07%, Derbertha, p, i:07%, Derby Princess 
2:08%, Diablo, p, 2:09% (sire of seven 2:10 per- 
formers), Owyhee 2:11% (sire of Owyho 2:07%, 
etc.), Demonio, p, 2:11% (sire of Mona Wilkes, p, 
2:06%), Christobel 2:11%, etc., and the dam Brilli- 
ant Girl 2:08%, Covey 2:25, Sunlight 2:25, Steineer 
2:29%, Saraway (sire of Winfield Stratton, p, 2:05%, 
etc.); Carrie Malone, dam of Carrie B., p, 2:18 (dam 
of the champion two-year-old pacer of 1907, Ray 
O'Light 2:13%), and grandam of Pinkey H., p, 
2:17%. Diablo 2:09%, one of Charles Derby's sons, 
has shared honors with McKinney 2:11% this year 
in the number of winners on the Pacific Coast Cir- 
cuit, and has a lower speed average than any other 
stalion in California. 

Katie G. has founded a family that for early and 
extreme speed -stands out more prominently than 
that of any other brood mare in California. Her 
descendants are noted for the excellence of their 
limbs and feet, perfect conformations, intelligence, 
soundness, speed and gameness. The greater the 
number of heats the more pronounced become their 
recuperative powers. 

Several times I had asked Mr. Malone to give me 
a full history of Fanny Wickham. He promised to 
do so, but the great disaster of April 18, 1906, de- 
stroyed his residence and all his papers, and the 
shock affected him seriously. He and his wife (his 
sole companion), were compelled to live in one of 
the refugee camps, where he passed away some 
months later. 

* * * 

As Captain McCloy handed me the letter he said: 
"Before you read this I will tell you about Fanny 
Wickham, as I did not have time when I saw you 
before. My father, William J. McCloy, lived in the 
city of Richmond, Va., and a more enthusiastic horse- 
man I never saw. He always owned a few good 
ones, and claimed that the greatest trotters would 
some day spring from the loins of some good thor- 
oughbred, or come from some great thoroughbred 
mare. In 1855 he purchased a chestnut two-year-old 
filly from John Wickham, who lived near Tuckahoe, 
twelve miles from Richmond, on the banks of the 
James river. When this fillycame to our place he 
said he would call her Fanny Wickham, because no 
better family lived in Old Virginia than the Wick- 
hams, and that John Wickham's father bred and 
owned Boston, and there never was a better race 
horse or sire than this bald-faced chestnut. When 
Fanny Wickham was old enough I broke her to ride 
and drive. She was a pure-gaited trotter, with per- 
fect knee and hock action, notwithstanding her 
thoroughbred ancestry, and it seemed almost Impos- 
sible to tire her. I was only a young fellow then, 
but was never averse to racing her. She won several 
match races for me, and one day I won a mile race, 
two out of three, with her, and then about dusk 
saddled her and won a half-mile race against a 
pretty good sprinter, which the owner thought was 
invincible. 

"Fanny was always ready and willing, and, I 
believe, would have made a great name for herself 
on the running turf had she been used exclusively 
for that kind of racing. In a little while her achieve- 
ments became the talk of that part of the country. 
Everybody, it seemed, was talking about her game 



qualities, and a horseman named Jacobs, who lived 
at Eastern Shore, Accomac county, challenged my 
father to race her against his horse Tom Benton. It 
was a two in three affair, over the half-mile track, 
which was built just outside Richmond. The sulky 
she pulled weighed over 100 pounds, and Fanny 
Wickham was only 15.1% hands high and weighed 
but. 950 pounds. Tom Barton won in straight heats, 
and that evening, as was the usual custom in those 
days, all who were directly interested in such events 
gathered at one of the principal hotels, and over 
sundry bottles of wine discussed the merits of the 
contestants. So sure was my father that Fanny 
Wickham could beat Tom Benton, that he offered to 
match her against him for a second race for $500 
a side, two-mile heats, best two in three, but 
the offer was declined. Before midnight, however, 
a trade was proposed and my father agreed to give 
Fanny Wickham, and $100 to boot, for Tom Benton. 

"The following morning, when Mr. Jacobs brought 
his horse up to the barn, my father was amazed when 
he heard that he had agreed to such a proposition, 
'for,, he said, 'she was worth three of Tom Benton's 
kind.' After everything was explained he said, 'Well, 
if I said so, I will not back out. Leave that horse 
here and take Fanny away. I hope she will get as 
good a home as the one she is leaving.' He turned 
on his heel and walked into the house. I could see 
that that foolish trade affected him as badly as it 
did me. Fanny was taken to Eastern Shore and bred 
to a thoroughbred horse called Sepastopol, owned by 
a man named Belcher. 

"It worried my father more than a little to think 
he had made this trade, and, meeting Calvin Green, 
owner of the Broadrock Race Course, below Rich- 
mond, one morning the following summer, the ques- 
tion of giving a race meeting came up. He said, 
'Mr. McCloy, if you will purchase Fanny Wickham 
and enter her in three races I propose, I will baak 
her to win evey one, and you and I will divide the 
winnings. We will give a good program each day, the 
principal events being a five-mile, a ten-mile, and a 
twenty-mile race, and give purses large enough to at- 
tract the attention of people from all parts of Vir- 
ginia, Maryland and Washington. I know of several 
owners who have been boasting about the good qual- 
ities of their trotters and we can make it interesting 
for them if you get that mare. I will put up as 
much money on her in the pool box as you will.' 

"My father at once wrote to Mr. Jacobs and 
shortly after the mare was in her old stall on the 
farm, and when I last visited the homestead (for the 
first time in over twenty years), I recalled the night 
she came there as distinctly as if it had not occurred 
in 1859. 

"But to the racing. The meetings were well ad- 
vertised and the purses were large for those days. 
Fanny was entered for the three big races. My 
father did not know she was in foal at the time, 
for Jacobs had never told him he had bred her, but, 
while I was training her under the saddle on the 
old plank road (jogging her five miles down and 
coming back at a very much faster clip), we used 
to wonder why she did not shrink up; never dream- 
ing of her condition, and attributing it to her being 
hog fat and having a grass belly. Finally the time 
arrived for the first race. I shall never forget that 
beautiful day. The grand stand and infield were 
crowded. After three half-mile dashes were de- 
cided the excitement about the big race course be- 
came intense. I remember the crowd that gathered 
around each of the contestants and the way that 
each was backed to win. That was before the war, 
in 1859. Everybody was flush, and the sporting 
spirit was strong- Fanny looked as round and fat 
as a mole. Her clean, thoroughbred head, short 
back, sloping shoulders and powerful quarters were 
praised by every one, and as for her legs, why they 
were as cean and flat as old Boston's. There was 
a mare entered in this five-mile race called Grey 
Eagless; she had more speed than Fanny and beat 
her eight lengths. In the ten-mile event (which took 
place the following week), a man named Walls, from 
Petersburg, who drove Fanny in her previous race, 
deliberately pulled her, letting a horse called Sea 
Breeze, from Washington, win, after he led the 
way with the mare in every mile but the last. At 
the head of the stretch he yanked her off her feet, 
but even with this break she came on and was 
only beaten three lengths. The excitement around 
the judges' stand when Walls dismounted almost 
resembled a riot. My father offered to bet $5,000 
she could beat Sea Breeze, and a number of his 
friends wanted to make it $10,000, and they would 
take any part of it, but the Sea Breeze contingent 
and their tool, Walls, had won enough and refused 
to take the bet. 

The twenty-mile race, which was set for two weeks 
following, was even better advertised than the 
others. Everybody felt that in her previous race 
Fanny Wickham proved her superiority, and, from 
early in the morning up to the time the race was 
called, crowds poured through the gates. Whole 
families came miles to see it, and the excitement 
was at fever-heat when Mr. Waldcn came out on 
the track with Fanny. My father thought I was too 
young to drive her in races of this description and 
that was why I did not do the teaming. There were 
four entries: J. B.Davis' horse, a mare called Black 
Squaw, the Haley horse and Fanny Wickham. Thou- 
sands were wagered on the result, for each of the 
contestants had scores of friends not afraid to back 
their opinions with coin. My father, Calvin Green 
and I stood at the head of the stretch, and, by a 
code of signals, kept Waldcn posted as to the miles 



6 



and when to move up. Fanny trailed the J. B. 
Davis horse for fifteen miles, never making a break 
or skip, but kept right at his sulky wheel. The 
horse tired on the first turn of the sixteenth mile 
and dropped out. Fanny took the lead. Black 
Squaw quit, hopelessly beaten, and the only horse 
left was Haley's, and he stayed in to the last. Fanny 
jogged in the last two miles, while Halsey's horse 
staggered under the wire. Haley was quite a char- 
acter, very loud mouthed and noted for his wit. 
When the crowd cheered him and his tired horse, 
jogged in the last two miles, while Haley's horse 
He's always in the ring!' Fanny was taken out of 
the sulky amid the cheers of the delighted crowd 
and led over to the stable, a large number of ad- 
mirers following her. Colonel McDaniel, who owned 
Harry Bassett, the celebrated race horse, my father, 
and Mr. Calvin Green adjourned to the club house! 
while I remained with the mare, the proudest young 
fellow that ever watched a trotter cool out. 

"Three months after this trying ordeal Fanny 
Wickham dropped a filly by Sebastopol, which I 
bought, but it met with an accident and died. My 
father then sold Fanny to a very wealthy barrel 
manufacturer named Wainwright, who lived in New 
York City. What became of her after that I never 
knew, for I was at the front until Lee's surrender, 
then I left Virginia for Frankfort, Ky., and engaged 
in civil engineering. I also had a farm and bought 
and sold a number of trotters. I had heard a great 
deal about a thoroughbred called Childe Harrold 
and wondered if he was the sire of Fanny Wick- 
ham. I learned that John Wickham was still living 
and wrote him about it." 

Mr. McCloy said in answer to my queries: "What 
kind of a disposition had she and how fast could she 
go?" "Well, she was always full of nerve; no negro 
could go near her and many time I had to stay at 
home to attend to her when I would have preferred 
going away with my companions shooting or fishing. 
She could trot a mile in 2:40 and go the last mile of 
a ten-mile race as fast as the first. Fanny never 
needed a whip or spur to urge her, and was remark- 
ably intelligent Once, while in Accomac county, 
she ran away and came home to us. We found 
her standing quietly in front of the big barn, early 
in the morning, waiting to go into her stall. 

"Here is the letter which I refer to and which I 
have cherished al these years." 

Near Westham Docks P. O., 

Hennico Co., Va., May 4, 1870. 
Mr. McCloy, Frankfort, Ky. 

Sir: — Yours of April was missent, and then mis- 
laid — hence the delay. 

The filly Fanny Wickham, as your father called 
her, was not by Childe Harold, as you suppose. I 
do not positively remember seeing her sire, nor can 
I find a note of him, but am pretty confident, almost 
certain in recollection, that her sire was Herald, by 
Sovereign, out of Imported Queen. Herald was 
owned by a friend of mine then living in Richmond, 
Dr. Cabell (since died), who told me of his pedigree. 

The dam of Fanny Wickham was by Imported 
Trustee, out of a Sir Charles mare, and she (the 
Sir Charles mare) out of a mare who was sired by 
Ball's Florizel, and who was the dam of Boston, and 
this dam of Boston was out of an Alderman mare. 

Fanny's pedigree, therefore, according to my 
best information, is as follows: Sired by Herald, 
dam by Trustee; grandam by Sir Charles; great 
grandam by Ball's Floritzel: great great grandam 
by Alderman. See Vol. of Old Turf Register. 

I would like to have you inform me of the latter 
history of Fanny Wickham. Is she still alive? 
Have you any of her descendants? I would like 
to have a good filly out of her. Yours respectfully, 

J. WICKHAM. 

There is decided discrepancy between the pedi- 
grees as furnished by Mr. Wickham and the one 
published on page 429, Volume 1, of the American 
Stud Rook, a pedigree which the late Henry William- 
son (owner of Williamson's Belmont), always 
claimed could not have been right, neither color nor 
age being given and none of the names of her dams. 
Mr. Williamson was a deep student of blood lines 
and I have often heard him doubt the authenticity of 
the one published, so it was to get the correct ver- 
sion that I so often importuned Mr. Malone. The 
pedigree published is as follows: 

FANNY WICKHAM, — m, foaled — . Bred by 
John Wickham, Esq., Tuckahoe Co., Va., by Herald. 
First dam by Imported Trustee; second dam by 
Imported Barefoot; third dam by Sir Archy; fourth 
dam by Ball's Floritzel; fifth dam by Imported 
Alderman, etc. 

The Ball's Florizel mare, as listed in the same 
volume, page 454, never was bred to Sir Archy but 
once, that was in 1827, and she missed, but she had 
two chestnut fillies by Sir Charles, one in 1824 and 
the other in 1826. One of these was undoubtedly 
the grandam of Fanny Wickham. Imported Trustee 
stood in Virginia in 1830 and it looks as if Mr. 
Wickham's version is correct. He should know, as 
he gives it very straight, and no doubt it was clearer 
in his memory than anywhere else. However, there 
is no denying the fact that Fanny Wickham's pedi- 
gree goes back through the Florizel mare (Boston's 
dam), to the thirteenth dam, by Brimmer. This is 
something that no one interested in her famous 
descendants has heretofore known. Therefore, it is 
not to be wondered at that gameness, soundness, 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

action and good looks distinguish every' member 
of this family when we analyze the royal breeding 
of this famous mare, whose grand-daughter, Katie 
G., was the greatest producer of early and extreme 
speed of any daughter of the immortal Electioneer. 

o 

BETTER HORSEMEN AND HORSES NEEDED. 



Washington, January 5. — Thirteen photographs 
from life, illustrative of racing and exploits in 
horsemanship form the unique exhibit sent to Con- 
gress by the direction of the president to accom- 
pany recommendations from himself and the chief 
of staff for the betterment of army riding. The 
pictures are intended to show how far ahead of 
American military men are Europeans in the art 
of equitation. One of the most thrilling represents 
an Italian cavalryman riding over a twenty-foot per- 
pendicular cliff, the photograph being taken in a 
series to illustrate the sagacity of the horse and the 
skill of the rider in maintaining his poise. 

There are pictures of German student officers 
apparently leaping from hill to hill; of fat majors 
and lieutenant colonels going through bogs and 
swamps and over hedges, riding the famous drag 
hunt of the German army. The official correspond- 
once with the pictures consists of letters from the 
president to the secretary of war requesting him 
to secure legislation to secure a higher decree of 
skill in horsemanship. . The report says: "These 
measures are essential to improvement of horse- 
manship in the army." 

Another letter from the president to the chairman 
of the house committee on military affairs transmits 
a report from Major General Bell, chief of staff, 
the president saying: "The field officers of our 
army cannot be held exclusively responsible for the 
poor riding which has been frequently observed. The 
quality of our horses does not equal that of the 
mounts used by foreign armies. Furthermore, 
though all infantry captains in European armies are 
mounted an infantry officer of our service has little 
opportunity to practice riding until he becomes a 
field officer." 

General Bell prefaces the report by quoting a 
note from the president referring to a "number of 
press comments, apparently inspired by the impres- 
sion that such a test (riding ability) was something 
extraordinary and unheard of" and requesting him 
to state the requirements in foreign armies in this 
respect. 

Speaking generally, the report shows that in Eu- 
rope all mounted officers of every grade shall keep 
themselves and their mounts in a fit condition for 
instant war service. Most of them maintain schools 
where student officers are constantly under instruc- 
tion in horsemanship. 

o 

A CAMPAIGN OF EDUCATION. 



An excellent plan for advancing the breeding inter- 
ests of the trotter has been advanced by one of the 
foremost breeders of Indiana. In particular he 
wishes to promote interest in the trotter in the 
Middle West. Just at the present time he is seek- 
ing the co-operation of other large breeders and 
the secretaries of the leading half-mile tracks in the 
section referred to. 

The plan as outlined and, of course, subject to 
revision and modification, is to have several of the 
owners of big breeding establishments agree to race 
a stable of high-class trotters and pacers on the 
half-mile tracks of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and Michi- 
gan. Just what tracks will, in a great measure, de- 
pend on the interest taken in the project by the va- 
rious secrtaries. First of all, the breeders are to 
agree to campaign a high-class, but not necessarily 
a large, stable of horses. Each stable is to have 
a free-for-all trotter and a free-for-all pacer and a 
good colt or two, and whatever other class horses 
they may elect. The drivers are to wear silk jackets 
of colors distinguishable by all the spectators in the 
grand stand, while all the grooms are to wear 
white jackets and. necessarily, the stable equipment 
is to be in keeping. 

The secretaries, assured of the support of the 
breeders, are to be asked to furnish purses for a 
free-for-all trot and a free-for-all pace and good pre- 
miums for the colts. It is argued that they can 
afford to do this, and will so realize when once tne 
plan is fully explained to them. It is not the desire 
of the breeders that the secretaries curtail the pro- 
fits of their racing associations, but they- are confi- 
dent that the secretaries, by doing their share, will 
be able to materially increase the earnings of the 
various associations with which they are connected. 

With the plan outlined in a general way, as above, 
it is well to consider the reasons for such a cam- 
paign. The main one is to advertise the trotter to 
the farmer and induce him to add one or more good 
trotting bred mares to his breeding stock. There are 
hundreds of farmers who see the trotter in races 
but once a year, at a fair or race meeting held not 
far from their farms. It is seldom that they see 
contests save between second raters or else horses 
that have not yet been developed into national Import- 
ance. The racing methods are oftimes lax and his 
impressions of light harness racing are not what 
it would be were the contests between some of the 
best trotters and pacers in the land and conducted 
not only strictly according to rule, but with all the at- 
tention to detail that serves so well to make other 
sporting events of interest to the occasional specta- 
tor. There is no doubt but that racing between the 



TSaturday, January 11. 1908. 

best trotters and pacers in the country and between 
colts sired by stallions of national reputation would 
be an incentive to the farmer to breed a colt capable 
of holding his own with the best in the land and with 
"a chance to develop into a performer of free-for-all 
calibre. 

There is no reason why every farmer should not 
have a few well-bred trotting mares on his farm. 
They would do the farm work much better than the 
kind of horses at present in use, the mares would 
benefit by being worked, the foals would be better 
because the mares were worked and a well-bred 
colt would be an annual source of revenue to the 
farmer. The campaign as outlined would be unex- 
celled as a means of impressing these facts on the 
farmer. The stallion owner would benefit because 
of the increased patronage that well-bred stallions 
would receive. The race track manager because 
such a meeting would be an attraction that would 
command the patronage of the whole community. 

The owners of large breeding establishments could 
well afford to make a campaign over the half-mile 
tracks. To send a stable out on the Grand Circuit 
is an expensive proposition and the returns, because 
of the hot competition, are small. The owner would 
be able to run away from business a few days each 
week and enjoy the pleasures of seeing his horses 
perform, something that is now impossible because 
of the time consumed in long trips. 

With horses of Grand Circuit calibre to draw 
crowds to the meetings, race track managers would 
find it a profitable investment to provide suitable 
purses for the free-for-all events. The mere fact 
that the stars were to race for big money would 
advertise the meetings and the interest would in- 
crease as the series progressed. By no other means 
would the secretaries be able to present such a mag- 
nificent and attractive program to their patrons 

The breeding interests and the sport would both 
benefit from a series of such meetings run on the 
highest plane and with noted horses competing. Con- 
ducted in a manner that would insure unexcelled 
contests and with all the attention to detail of a 
metropolitan meeting, the farmers would find light 
harness racing an unequaled source of recreation 
during or after a busy season of work and would 
awaken to the fact that the trotter and pacer fur- 
nishes not only pleasure but profit to those engaged 
in breeding and would soon understand that the 
trotter is the greatest horse for the farm, the show 
ring, the road, the speedway and the track that there 
is in the world. 

The plan as outlined above is worthy of the best 
consideration and support of those interested in the 
light harness horse, both breeders and race track 
managers, as it will afford both a means of reaching 
the class of patrons that are essential to the wel- 
fare of the sport and the industry. — Western Horse- 
man. 

o 

STAKE FOR STALLIONS. 



For some unknown reason, says The Horseman, 
we have dropped the stallion stakes that were 
so popular a few years ago. When these stakes were 
offered for trotting stallions, we had the very best 
of these horses racing for the highest honors of the 
trotting turf. Stallions which won such stakes took 
a rank of great importance, and were ever after 
known as winners of such stakes. Since the time 
of Cresceus we have dropped this great stake, and 
owners of good stallions are deprived of the oppor- 
unity of showing their worth in a proper class. 

An association would have little difficulty in giv- 
ing a stallion stake for about $2,000. The horses 
might be required to be entered on the graduated 
entrance scale, their entrance fee being regulated by 
their time mark. For example, horses with records 
below 2: OS might be charged an entrance fee of 
five per cent of the purse; 2:10 horse, four per cent: 
2:12 to 2:10, three per cent; 2:15 to 2:12, two per 
cent; slower than 2:15, one per cent. At this rate 
there should be enough entries to pay about eighty 
per cent of the purse. If the stake was a $10,000 
ffair, this would leave about $2,000 for the associa- 
tion to pay, and the card would be well worth the 
money to an enterprising association. 

Among the stallions which would be likely to be 
entered in such a stake are General Watts 2:06%: 
Kentucky Todd 2:08%: Athasham 2:09%; Tregantle 
2:09%: Codero 2:09%: Sterling McKinney 2:09%; 
Mainsheet 2:05;King Entertainer 2:10%; Shady G. 
2:10%; Judge Parker 2:10%; Exalted 2:07%: Guy 
Axworthy 2:08%; Coronado 2:09%! Guvallis Direc- 
tum 2:09 % These, with a large number of green 
stallions in the country, would make a splendid list 
to draw from. 

The association that will give a stake of this 
kind will find the prominence it would get in the 
trotting horse word would more than pay the cost 
of giving the stake. 

Here is an opportunity for an association to get 
fame at a small cost.' 

o 

Gen. Nelson A. Miles is one of the most enthusi- 
astic of Boston's road drivers and heartily enjoys the 
sport on the snowpath. With the pacer Quadriga 
2:08%, a fast young trotter by Bingen 2:06%. and 
others, he has a strong stable. The General also 
has a mare or two that he is breeding. 



Any horse that starts in a race with hopples must 
wear them all through the race. If he starts without 
them he must race the contest through without them. 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



RACING HERE AND IN THE EAST. 



When a Pacific Coast horse owner sits down by 
his own fire-side and figures on taking his horse 
across the mountains, and winning a lot of races 
and a big bunch of money on the Grand and other 
circuits, let him reflect over the following facts: 

It costs at least $1,000 cash to ship to Chicago, 
pay car fares and get back home again. That's a 
thousand on the wrong side of the ledger to start 
with; 

Now pick out a good, consistent race horse and 
figure his winnings on the Grand or the Great Wes- 
tern circuit. The pacer Angus Pointer 2:01% started 
ten times on the Grand Circuit, including the 
Detroit and Lexington meetings. He won ten 
races and was second in the other. His total win- 
nings were $7730. 

That great trotting mare Lillian R. 2:06% started 
nine times, winning eight firsts and was once 
second. Her total winnings were $7595. 

Angus Pointer and Lilian R. were the two most 
consistent winners that started with fast records 
and raced through the Grand Circuit, Angus Pointer's 
mark at the close of 1906 being 2:02% and Lillian 
R.'s 2:08%. 

The trotter that won the most races and the most 
money on the Great Western Circuit was Sterling 
McKinney 2:09%. He was four times first and 
twice second, and was in all the slow classes where 
the big purses were. His winnings on that circuit 
were $5375; and no other horse won as much. 
The pacer Straight Advice 2:05^ started the year 
without a record. He contested in nine races on the 
Great Western, winning six, and being once third, 
once fourth and once unplaced. He won $5000 all 
told. 

The California owner who could take a trotter or 
pacer with a fast record east this year and have him 
do as well as Lillian R. or Angus Pointer did on the 
Grand Circuit last season, would doubtless think he 
had done pretty well, and the same would be true 
of the owner who took an unmarked trotter or pacer 
to the Great Western Circuit and win as often as 
Sterling McKinney or Straight Advice. 

We had a pretty fair circuit out here on the Pa- 
cific Coast, last season, counting the California and 
North Pacific circuits as one. The largest winner 
of the fast record pacers was Sir John S., who 
started the season with a record of 2:10%, made 
in 1906, and closed it with a mark of 2:04 1 / £. He 
won every race he started in — six in all — and had 
$5750 to his credit at the close of the racing season. 

The wonderful little mare Inferlotta was the 
champion of the green pacing class. She raced at 
every meeting from Salinas to Sacramento and then 
went south, winning at Fresno and walking over at 
other meetings later on. She won a little over 
$5000, and was only beaten in her first two races, 
getting second money in both. 

Among the trotters Carlokin and Berta Mac were 
the principal winners on the Pacific Coast Circuit. 
Carlokin had a record of 2:20%, while Berta Mac 
was a green trotter when the season of 1907 opened. 
Both are by McKinney, and won over $4,000 each 
during the season, Berta Mac having $4,200 to her 
credit, and Carlokin pressing her very close for the 
honors of largest money winning trotter. 

Now, let us see how the winnings of the horses 
mentioned above compare as to circuits: 

Grand Circuit. 



Lillian R. 2:08%, trotter $7,595 

Angus Pointer 2:01%, pacer 7,730 

Great Western Circuit. 

Sterling McKinney 2:09%, trotter $5,375 

Straight Advice 2:05%, pacer 5,000 

Pacific Coast Circuit. 

Berta Mac 2:13%, trotter $4,200 

Carlokin 2:13%, trotter 4,100 

Inferlotta 2:04%, pacer 5,200 

Sir John S. 2:04%, pacer 5,750 



It will be seen by the above figures that with a 
good Pacific Coast Circuit our home owned horses 
can have as great an earning capacity as the Great 
Western or any of the lesser circuits can provide. 
Of course, the Grand Circuit offers inducements to 
an owner who can take a Sonoma Girl or Sweet 
Marie across the mountains that no other racing 
circuit can approach, but the horse that wins over 
there must be a genuine crackerjack, or have noth- 
ing but good luck from the day he leaves home until 
he returns. It is a long and expensive trip by rail 
from California to the Mississippi River, and dis- 
tance always lends enchantment to the view, unless 
the viewer has his eyes turned towards home and 
there is no money in his pocket. 

■ o ■ 

The good pacing gelding J. J. J. 2:06%, owned 
by John J. Jermyn of Scranton, Pa., fell on the 
street at Hornell, N. Y., recently and broke a leg, 
which necessitated his being destroyed. He was 
raced to his record last fall at Lexington, Ky., by 
W. L. Snow, in whose stable he was at the time 
of the accident. 



Lon McDonald will do his winter training at Selma, 
Alabama. He will take with him a well bred two- 
year-old filly by John A. McKerron 2:04%, dam An- 
zella 2:06%. This filly is owned by a Russian horse- 
man, who leaves her with McDonald until after she 
has fulfilled her Futurity engagements. 



THE EXTREME SPEED SIRES. 



But eighteen stallions have sired as many as 
twenty 2:15 performers, and the list, with age of 
foaling and names of their sires, follows: 



Name of Stallion — 2:15 2:10 

McKinney (1887), by Alcyone 45 17 

Gambetta Wilkes (1881),' by Geo. Wilkes 36 16 

Baron Wilkes (1882). by Geo. Wilkes.. 32 11 

Simmons (1879), by Geo. Wilkes 32 4 

Brown Hal (1879), by Tom Hal Jr 31 11 

Alcantara (1876), by Geo. Wilkes 31 6 

Onward (1875), by Geo. Wilkes 29 11 

Direct (1885), by Director 28 12 

Wilton (1880), by Geo. Wilkes 26 9 

Chimes (1884), by Electioneer 26 9 

Ashland Wilkes (1882), by Red Wilkes.. 24 9 

Allerton (1886), by Jay Bird 24 7 

Bourbon Wilkes (1875), by Geo. Wilkes.. 24 5 

Red Wilkes (1874), by Geo. Wilkes.... 24 3 

Bobby Burns (1888), by Gen. Wilkes 21 7 

Guy Wilkes (1878), by Geo. Wilkes 21 4 

Anderson Wilkes (1884), by Onward.. 20 5 

Prodigal (1886), by Pancoast 20 3 



The above table makes a remarkable showing for 
the family of Geo. Wilkes. Nine of these eighteen 
sires are by Geo. Wilkes himself, and five others 
are his grandsons, leaving but four that are from 
other families. Of these one is by Electioneer, one 
is by the pacing bred horse Tom Hal Jr., one by 
Director and one by Pancoast. All but Brown Hal 
and Prodigal trace in the direct male line to Ham- 
bletonian 10, and Prodigal has several crosses' of 
the blood of that great progenitor of trotting speed. 

o 

PALMER CLARK SAYS. 



Scott McLane is shaping up Auto 2:07% to take 
a fall out of Bolivar 2:00% over the Chicago speed- 
way. Bolivar has been added to the Chicago speed 
class for the purpose of cleaning up all comers. 
There are some in Chicapo that believe Bolivar is 
not invincible and who think Auto 2:07% can give 
him a convincing argument, consequently they have 
enlisted Scott McLane of this city into the cause. 
Scott is always one of those willing kind who has 
the utmost confidence in his horses. He is now 
putting the finishing touches on Auto before he 
makes his Chicago debut. 

Auto was at pasture all summer, while Scott was 
away making good with his grand trotter Octoo 
2:10%, a brother of Auto. Scott called at my stable 
and asked me to "ride after a good horse," and 
when we struck smooth slipping Scott turned Auto 
loose and the speed he showed was a caution. A 
ride behind a fast horse is exhilarating and refresh- 
ing compared with a trip in one of those jug-jug 
wiggling mechanical wagons. 

When Auto is' ready no horse has more straight 
away speed than he has, for he is sound, clean, and 
willing, and to-day is free from excuses, and if 
Scott has as much patience as nerve, he will beat 
Bolivar. 

The advent of these two speed marvels on the Chi- 
cago snow path will be awaited with interest, more 
especially as there are owners of other nags who 
believe they can beat them both. 

The newspaper Futurities for foals of 1908 so far 
announced are remarkable for their extreme liberal- 
ity. In the Horseman Stake, $15,000 guaranteed, a 
one dollar bill on or before March 2d makes every 
mare owned by the nominator eligible. A $5 pay- 
ment November 2d on weanlings and a $5 payment 
May 1st on yearlings are the only payments required 
before the year of the race, when $150 must be paid 
by each starter. 

The American Horse Breeder stake, $10,000 guar- 
anteed, is practically the same, with the exception 
that $1 must be paid on every mare named. The 
Horse Review, $12,500 guaranteed, closes March 10th, 
when every subscriber of the Horse Review can name 
every mare he owns free of charge. The weanlings 
and yearling payments are the same as in the other 
events, but only a $100 payment is required from 
starters. It should also be added that the yearling 
payment on the Horseman staKe includes a year's 
subscription to that journal. 

For practically a little over $30 a colt can thus be 
made eligible, by paying the additional starting fee, 
to nearly $30,000 in stakes. With such liberal con- 
ditions, if the promoters get out with a whole skin, 
they will indeed be lucky. 

o 

Mr. J. N. Anderson of Salinas, who bred and still 
owns the Occident and Breeders Futurity winner 
of 1906, Delia Derby 2:17, writes us that the marc 
Queen Mab, owned by Mr. E. P. Iverson of Salinas, 
foaled a bay filly January 7, 1908, by Highland 
C. 2:19%. Mr. Anderson says: "This, I think, 
is the first of the crop of futurity candidates nom- 
inated in Pacific Breeders Futurity for foals of 
1908. The filly is dark bay with near hind ankle 
white and small snip on nose. Queen Mab is by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16V2, out of Nina B. Electioneer, 
next dame Gabilan Maid, a full sister to the great 
brood mare Lady Ellen by Carr's Mambrino. So 
you see this one is bred in the hight of fashion." 
She certainly is, and the Electioneer-Wilkes cross 
is a double one in this instance, as both sire and 
dam are representatives of this line of breeding. 
Highland C. is now making a season at Watsonville, 
Henry Struve having leased him from W. II. Clark, 
Jr., and the prospects for a big season are excellent. 



COOLING OUT. 



After the youngster has been worked, jog briskly 
to the stable, unharness him, after putting on his 
halter and before crosstying him, sponge out his 
month and give him a sup of water; throw a light 
cooler over him, then take off the boots, sponge off 
the legs and roll on the bandages if you are using 
bandages on the colt; they generally need them after 
they have advanced to the point where they can 
step a 2:40 gait or faster. Be sure not to have 
your cooling-out place where the colt will have to 
stand in a draft. Turn back the cooler and if you 
have brought out a light scrape go over the young- 
ster with the scrapers, then rub out all the water, 
straighten the hair the right way and cover him 
up well and take him out for a walk. Watch his 
cooling out carefully so that he will not freeze up 
and dry out too quickly; after he has been walked 
about ten or fifteen minutes take him in and give 
him another light rub-out; if you find that he is not 
clothed warm enough make the change to a medium 
weight cooler instead of the light one. It Is often 
a good thing to throw a light woolen hood over the 
loins, in addition to the cooler, as this is the place 
that a great many horses go wrong and get sore. 
Give him a few more swallows of water before you 
take him out for another drill. When his temperature 
becomes normal, and a good groom does not need 
a thermometer to tell when this period is reached, 
by simply placing his hand underneath the blankets 
at the flank he can tell in a twinkling whether he 
is cooled out or not. Give him a few bites of grass, 
if situated so that you can, before taking him to 
do him up. After brushing him out well, change the 
bandages, pick out his feet and wash them well. 
If the work has been unusually stiff or hard, it may 
be necessary to use a good body wash of some kind, 
and as there are so many different kinds and they 
are applied in so many different ways it will be a 
hard matter to give advice that will be satisfactory 
to all parties, but one of the best combinations for 
this purpose that we have ever used is composed of 
camphor, arnica and pure witch-hazel. 

Take a couple of ounce sof camphor gum and cut 
it with alcohol; add three ounces of tincture of 
arnica and put this into a gallon of witch-hazel. This 
lotion or liniment may be rubbed over the shoul- 
ders, forearms, loins, stifles and gaskins thoroughly. 
Put on the woolen steamers and pin them up se- 
curely, blanket him well and turn him loose in his 
box-stall to a good bunch of bright hay. The above 
liniment is a good leg wash as well as a good body 
wash. Don't let the feet get hard and dry, pack 
them with clay after his work before putting him 
away for the night. — Speed Bulletin. 

o 

A man who stands at the head of one of the larg- 
est horse-selling establishments in this country re- 
cently said that one of the noticeable effects of the 
introduction of automobiles had been to greatly in- 
crease the demand for speed in the fashionable car- 
riage horse, remarks an exchange. "People get 
used to going fast in their touring cars," he said, 
"and when they come to buying coach horses they 
all want a bit of step— a good bit, I may say. Next 
to conformation, it's the first thing they look for. If 
a horse can't step away the dealer is wasting time 
to show him in most cases, for the customer won't 
buy. Showy action was the main thing only a few 
years ago, but 'get there' seems to be the watchword 
with everybody now. Of course, the best horse is, 
and always has been, the one that combines speed 
and action, but speed comes first." It is this de- 
mand for step or pace, that makes the trotting bred 
carriage and coach horse the best selling horse in 
this field. Horses of hackney breeding may be 
able to show more action, but when it comes to ac- 
tion combined with pace, the trotting bred carriage 
horse has no serious rival. 



Zolock 2:05% will be one of the best patronized 
stallions in California this year. His colts all show 
so much speed that breeders looking for futurity 
winners are patronizing him extensively After a 
season at San Bernardino he will be taken to Walla 
Walla, Washington, where a very large number of 
mares are already booked to this son of McKinney. 
His son Sherlock Holmes 2:06% gave Zolock a 
"rep" in the northern country last summer that 
made the breeders up there want mora of them. 



The Horseman says that Ed Hither has big hopes 
of doing great things on the Grand Circuit this year 
with Mack Mack 2:08. Bither found there was more 
in the horse than had been got out of him, and as 
he was a little peculiar it took him some time to 
learn what the horse needed. Having found this out, 
Bither thinks he has nothing more to do now than 
carry the horse to the limit of his speed, which he 
figures is nearer two minutes than 2:08. 



D. A. Messner of Oxford, Ind.. the breeder of Dan 
Patch 1:55, has sold to J. W. Nutt. of Wichita Falls, 
Texas. Zelica Morgan, by Respond, out of the dam 
of Dan Patch, and Jim Klatawah, by Klatawah, out 
of Zelica Morgan, for $1,500. 



Two ice meetings of considerable importance will 
be given at Montreal this winter, one January 21st 
to 25th, the other February 13th to 15th. Good purses 
will be offered, and the best of the Canadian ice 
horses are expected to compete. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



I /. ROD, GUN AND KENNEL /. 1 

| CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT | 



SNIPE SHOOTING IN CEYLON. 



Though the large game of Ceylon has greatly de- 
creased in numbers, the island is still quite a para- 
dise for the snipe shooter. The climate is certainly 
trying, and a day after snipe in the damp, hot-house 
heat of the low country is the very hardest of work. 
The nearest approach to these conditions that one 
meets with in Upper India is when shooting a jheel 
early in September, for then the sun has lost little, 
if any of its hot-weather power, and the whole earth 
is steaming from the effects of the recent monsoon. 
Later, when the Indian cold weather has set in, 
snipe are shot under quite pleasant conditions. 
This is never the case in the Island Colony, where 
there is no cold weather, and the shooter's eyes are 
aways blurred with perspiration and his body ting- 
ling with prickly heat. I spent three months in 
Ceylon in 1900, and for most of that time was at 
Trincomali, whence I made two ten-day trips to 
Lake Kantalai. There I put up in the dilapidated 
old rest-bungalow, the same one in which Sir 
Samuel Baker, in The Rifle and Hound in Ceylon, 
mentions his brother having had a narrow escape 
from a snake. This snake incident was forcibly 
brought back to my memory by an unpleasant ad- 
venture which I met with myself on the snipe ground 
below the lake. 

The weather being very hot and steamy, I was 
foolishly shooting in loose cotton shorts, not reach- 
ing to the knee, while I wore socks and tennis shoes, 
so that my legs were bare. I had two snipe down 
in a patch of very green grass about a foot and a 
half high, so walked in to look for the birds, parting 
the grass with my gun barrels in the search. While 
thus engaged I felt a drag around one leg, which 
I took at first to be a creeper. Glancing down, I 
saw, to my horror, the loop of a dark-colored snake's 
body round my bare leg! Instinctively I jumped 
into the air. and the snake fell off and instantly 
vanished among the thick grass. After a bit, when 
I had recovered my nerve, I walked again, with great 
precaution, into the grass, and made a strict search 
for the two snipe. I found one only, though two 
had dropped close together in the patch. Subse- 
quently I came to the conclusion that one of my 
snipe was not quite dead and that the snake had 
seized it and was carrying it off when he got a turn 
round my leg. This is pure conjecture, however, for 
I never saw the reptile's head. What kind it was, 
I do not know, but in the instantaneous glance I 
had of the body I thought the coloring remarkably 
like that of a cobra. 

The paddy fields below the lake, from which they 
were irrigated by an overflow stream, held a lot of 
snipe. While at Kantalai I spent most of my time 
in hunting for other game — spotted deer, green 
pigeons, etc. — so that only three days were devoted 
to snipe. My bags were then sixteen, eleven and a 
half, and seven and a half couple. I was, however, 
constantly coming across snipe when not specially 
looking for them, and used to pick up two or three 
couple in odd corners every day. One portion of the 
paddy fields was much disturbed by natives work- 
ing, and the snipe used to leave the open and lie 
just inside the heavy forest which bordered the 
cultivation. A native walking inside the jungle 
readily put these birds up, and they generally came 
out high over the tops of the trees. Snipe coming 
overhead are by no means as hard to hit as one 
would expect, as they fly straight and do not twist. 

There is a little lake in the heart of the jungle 
about a. mile and a half from Kantalai, where I found 
snipe sitting on the bare mud in the shade of low, 
spreading trees which grew beside the water. The 
branches of these trees were only about a couple 
of feet above the mud, and the snipe when disturbed 
used to shoot out from under them like rockets. The 
problem was to stop the birds before they got out 
over deep water, for the lake was full of crocodiles, 
so that it was only safe to walk a short way in. 

In Ceylon are numerous grass tanks, as they are 
called. These consist of a sea of very high grass 
growing in a very little water. One day near Nala- 
vile, some miles north of Trincomali, I was skirt- 
ing one of these grass tanks looking for snipe, 
armed only with a shot-gun and Xo. 8 cartridges. 
Suddenly within a hundred yards of me the huge 
head of a buffalo bull was raised above the grass, 
and the animal with the nose stuck straight out and 
his horns aid flat on his neck, looked so ill-tempered 
and menacing that I made a hasty retreat to a more 
distant part of the tank. I had often heard of this 
buffalo before, and had been told that he and a 
solidary elephant were generally seen together. The 
elephant, however, I never came across, though his 
fresh tracks were in all directions. 

At Tamlegam, between Kantalai and Trincomali, 
there is a celebrated snipe ground, where very 
heavy bags are constantly made. I paid a visit to 
this place, but found the walking so heavy and try- 
ing in the hot sun that I gave up after shooting 
seven couple. I do not remember ever having met 
such deep and sticky ground as that day in the 
Tamlegam paddy fields. I went in to the knees 



at every step, and it was the greatest exertion to 
pull my feet out of the tenacious slime. 

There is a pretty little lake at Periyakulam, seven 
and a half miles from Trincomali, and round its 
edges I used always to get a few snipe, but the 
extent of the ground is small. A brother officer 
went to Periyakuam one morning, and found, to his 
disgust, an elephant standing in the middle of the 
snipe ground. From a safe distance he saluted the 
intruder with a charge of No. 8, and the elephant 
stalked away into the jungle. The big beast had, 
however, effectually scared away all the snipe, and 
not one was to be found. 

All the Ceylon tanks are full of fish, and during 
the heat of the day, when shooting was out of the 
question, 1 used to fish for olive carp (Darbus chry- 
sopoma) with a roach rod and bread paste. The 
fish were pentiful and ran from half a pound to 
one and one-half pounds, giving fair sport on the fine 
tackle I used. Murral (ophiocephalus) too swarm 
everywhere, and take a small live bait freely. In 
fact, the sportsman who makes a trip to any of the 
Ceylon lakes should always make a point of taking 
a rod. All the fish, too, are eatable, the Indian 
gudgeon especially (Gobius giuris), being really ex- 
cellent. These last take a worm or very small live 
bait freely, and I have caught them up to one and 
a half pounds in weight. — The Asian. 

o 

TOO MANY COUGARS. 



Deer hunters are advocating a vigorous cam- 
paign against mountain lions, which beasts are 
pests in some portions of the State. There is a 
bounty of $20 a head offered by the Hoard of Fish 
Commissioners, and It is believed that this should 
be a strong inducement to decrease the animals. 

It is the opinion that the lions do more harm to the 
deer supply than all the hunters, for the latter pay 
some attention to closed season and pass by the 
does and fawns, while the lions work all the time 
and not only play havoc with the larger game, but 
take their fill upon the smaller birds and animals 
pursued by sportsmen as well. 

It is said by hunters of wide experience and keen 
powers and opportunities unusual of observation, 
that, while game in general is on the de- 
cline, the lions are increasing. This is in spite 
of the fact that, every hunter kills a lion at sight 
and never misses a chance to help exterminate the 
Supply. These big cats are skulkers of the most 
crafty type, however, and it is no small job to 
clean them out in any locality where they have 
obtained a foothold 

Hunting, hounding with a pack of "varmint" dogs, 
trapping and poisoning are the methods generally 
resorted to by stockmen to keep the lion crop down. 
They are vitally interested from a business stand- 
point, for the lions get away with many a lamb and 
calf, to say nothing of full-grown sheep and other 
stocks on occasion. They are fond of shoats and 
poultry. 

Mountain lions are worst in the timber as a rule, 
but the well-brushed foothills are also a favorite 
place for these maurauders. Although large and 
powerful animals, lions are very easily killed. They 
lack the traditional nine lives of the cat tribe. A 
22-caliber Winchester special bullet rightly placed 
has killed many a lion and a shotgun at fairly close 
quarters is deadliest of all. 

Coyotes and wildcats also do great mischief to the 
game supply. From one section in the Sacramento 
valley it is reported hunters have found this year 
more than fifty deer, evidently the pray of mountain 
lions. In the same country it is doubtful if the 
hunters got as many. 

Wildcats kill a great many fawns. Hounding deer 
has many drawbacks, but it has the advantage that 
in a country where hounds are running much the 
vermin are kept busy getting out of the way. Oregon 
has a law that makes it a misdemeanor to shoot a 
deer ahead of hounds, but also forbids the killing 
of the hounds that are running the deer. It is 
said the hounds rarely run a deer down of them- 
selves and their chasing it thus is argued a pro- 
tective measure for the deer, for no coyote or cougar 
is likely to bother the animals much when dogs 
are scouring the country. 

Some hint of what may be accomplished by ex- 
terminating vermin and carefully protecting game 
comes with statistics recently compiled in Austria. 
Every kill is recorded and the game record for 
Lower Austria last year includes 3739 red deer. 
22,654 roebuck, 358,000 hares, 64,000 pheasants, and 
302,000 partridges. Bohemia did even better; 
642,000 hares and 1,222,000 partridges were reported; 
more than two million partridges were killed in the 
monarchy. Wild game of larger size was plenty- 
ful also, 21 bears, 58 wolves, 34 lynx, 143 wildcats, 
645 eagles and 1145 otters. More than 40,000 foxes 
were kilied. 

o 

Quail are reported to be very plentiful in the vicin- 
ity of Oroville. The recent rains have stripped the 
brush of leaves; all that is necessary is a heavy 
frost to make ideal quail shooting conditions. 



QUAIL IN NEW ZEALAND. 



The proposed importation of Australian and Chi- 
nese quail into New Zealand is by no means a new 
scheme so far as the introduction of quail into the 
colony is concerned. 

There exlstel until comparativey recent years 
a New Zealand quail, which at one time flourished 
in considerable numbers, but that species is now 
extinct. In Rullc's "Manual of the Birds of New 
Zealand," published in 1882, the writer states, that 
the New Zealand quail, the only indigenms repre- 
sentative i i the colony of the order galllnae, was 
then on the verge of extinction. In the early days, 
he adds, the bird was excessively abundant in all 
ot the opan country, and especially on the grass- 
covered downs of the South Island. The first settlers 
who carried with them from the Old Country 
their traditional love of sport, enjoyed some ex- 
excellent quail shooting for several years, and in 
1848 two sportsmen shot as many as 43 brace in the 
course of a single day, within a few miles of what 
is now the town of Nelson, and it is recorded that 
in the early days, on the plains near Selwyn, a bag 
of twenty brace was not looked upon as extra- 
ordinary sport for a day's shooting. Partly owing 
to the introduction of dogs, cats, and rats, and part- 
ly to the prevalence of the bush and grass fires, the 
native quail rapidly disappeared. 

Then was begun the importation of Californian 
quail, a larger and more vigorous bird then the New 
Zealand species, and able to fly much better. That 
bird has made a good fight against its many ene- 
mies, and up to the present time exists in consider- 
able numbers in different localities in New Zealand. 
The Australian quail, which it is now proposed to 
introduce, is very much like the New Zealand quail, 
and is very abundant in Tasmania, South Australia, 
and New South Wales. Open, grassy plains, exten- 
sive grass flats, and the parts of the country under 
cultivation are situations favorable to the habits of 
the bird. "In its economy and mode of life," states 
an Australian authority, "it so closely resembles the 
quail of Europe that a description of the one is 
equally descriptive of the other." The bird possesses 
considerable powers of flight, and can therfore es- 
cape from the earth enemies. The New Zealand 
quail, on the other hand, was a poor flyer, and fell 
an easy prey to stoats and weasels, and other pests. 
The chief food of the Australian quail is stated to 
be grain, seeds, and insects, and owing to its par- 
tiality for cut corn fields it is also known by the 
name of "stubble quail." The Chinese quail also 
resemble very closely both the Australian quail and 
the extinct New Zealand species. It is a bird full 
of vitality, and can exist under most trying condi- 
tions. Extensive shipments of live Chinese quail 
are regularly made from China to Sydney, where the 
birds are sold for food purposes. They are crowded 
together in crates, and many of them find it diffi- 
cult to procure the food supplied to them, but, not- 
withstanding these prejudicial conditions, the per- 
centage of deaths is comparativey small. 

Before sanctioning the proposed importation, the 
Minister of Agriculture is inviting the opinion of the 
fanning community on the desirability of import- 
ing the species referred to, as he has been informed 
that quail consume the young grass, and are some- 
what of a farmer's foe. 

Dr. Moorhouse, President < i the Canterbury Ac- 
climatisation Society, who was consulted by a "Re- 
feree" reporter relative to this fear, stated that 
quail did no more harm than partridges, which were 
imported into and encouraged in the colony. "There 
is no question," the doctor added, "that quail pick 
up a certain amount of grain, but they do not eat 
standing grain to any extent. They feed on stubble 
and so on, and they certainly do eat a certain amount 
of young grass, but nothing like enough to make any 
difference to the farmer. There is not the slightest 
chance of their being a pest, but even if they did 
become too numerous they are easily shot down, and 
their numbers could be reduced without difficulty. 
In the course of further conversation, Dr. Moorhouse 
stated that the Californian quail still held their own 
in some parts of the colony. The Australian and 
the Chinese quail were very good flyers, and conse- 
quently would stand a good chance of existing. The 
Australian quail were already acclimatised in the 
North Island, and doing fairly well up there. Refer- 
ence was made to the fact that the Californian quail, 
at one time very numerous in Nelson, had almost 
died out, and the doctor stated that there were sev- 
eral causes combining to account for that. There 
was the extensive inbreeding which destroyed the 
vitality of the birds, and they were also subjected 
to the ravages of the hawk, which had become prac- 
tically a carrion bird of late years. The Californian 
quail. Dr. Moorhouse explained, was still found in 
considerable numbers in localised spots in the col- 
ony, and there were a fair number of them to be 
found on the Port Hils, in the sand hills round about 
Christchurch, and in the river beds in the province. 
Dr. Moorhouse heartily approves of the project to 
import the Australian and Chinese quail, and is 
firmly of opinion that they will not prove trouble- 
some to the farmer. His only doubt is as to whether 
they will manage to exist or not. 

Mr. D. Macfarlane, president of the Canterbury 
A. and P. Association, also approved of the 
proposed importations, and he did not think 
that the farming community would object to 
them. The quail had not proved a nuisance in 
Australia, and there was no reason to fear that they 
would prove troublesome here. He thought, her- 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



I 



ever, there was Very little hope of the Australian 
or Chinese quail multiplying in New Zealand, owing 
to the number of enemies they would have to con- 
tend with, but if they were brought here they 
should be turned out in localities where they would 
be given a reasonable chance to exist. 

The Curator of the Christchurch Museum, Mr. 
Waite, who is an authority on Australian birds, very 
much doubts whether the Australian quail or the 
Chinese quail for that matter would be able to 
exist here if introduced, seeing that the New Zea- 
land species was exterminated by causes which still 
exist. The Australian quail very possiby nibbled 
off the young heads of grass, but they would never 
become a pest, and quail were not in any country 
regarded as mharmful. — Weekly Express. 

o 

DEL MONTE SHOW. 



Awards. 

American Foxhounds. Puppy dogs and bitches — 
1 E P Shortall's Dante, 2 Carroll Cook's Prince 
Louis. Limit dogs — 1 Carroll Cook's Judge. Winners 
dogs — 1 Judge, res Dante. Novice bitches — 1 Carroll 
Cook's Queenie, absent Carroll Cook's Clarinda. 
Winners bitches — 1 Queenie. 

Pointers. Novice dogs — 1 J W Gibb's Mike Geary. 
Limit dogs — 1 Mike Geary. Open dogs (under 55 
pounds) — 1 A Balfour's Senator's Jack. 2 Mike 
Geary. Winners dogs — 1 Senator's Jack, res Mike 
Geary. Puppy bitches — 1 C. G. Gilbert's Doc's Fan. 
Open bitches (under 50 pounds) — 1 H. B. Town- 
send's Walla Walla Rush. Winners bitches — 1 Walla 
Walla Rush, res Doc's Fan. 

English Setters. Puppy dogs — 1 J. C. Kortick's 
Arbutus Prince, 2 Mrs. J. Otten's Bob Law, 3 F. 
W. Motlow's Rip Van Winkle. Novice dogs — 1 Ar- 
butus Prince. Limit dogs — 1 Victor Kuehn's Mall- 
wyd Beau. Open dogs — 1 Mallwyd Beau, 2 F. P. 
Butler's Tiverton. Winners dogs — 1 Mallwyd Beau, 
res Tiverton. Puppy bitches — 1 F. W. Motlow's 
Kate. Novice bitches — 1 A. Edwards' Lady Jane. 
Limit bitches — 1 Mark Manning's Lady Dorrie M., 
absent Huron Rock's Ch. Sue Gladstone. Winners 
bitches — 1 Lady Dorrie M., res Lady Jane. 

Gordon Setters. Open and winners dogs — 1 A. L. 
Stuart's Ch. Doc Watson. Limit bitches — 1 G. 
Creyk's Nellie C. Open bitches — 1 H. B. Knox's Sis 
Winners bitches — 1 Sis, res Nellie C. 

Irish Setters. Novice dogs — 1 Dr. R. B. Corco- 
ran's Tipperary. Limit dogs — 1 R. H. Groves' Phil 
Law, 2 George S. Lillie's Reddy. Open dogs — 1 Reddy. 
Winners dogs — 1 Phil Law, res Reddy. Limit and 
winners bitches — 1 R. H. Groves' St. Lambert 
Phyllis. 

Field Trial Class. Absent Ed Weisbaum's Rex 
Rodfield. 

Irish Water Spaniels. Open and winners dogs — 1 
Frisco Kennels' (Wm. Bay) Our Chance Jr. Open 
and winners bitches — 1 Frisco Kennels' Frisco Dot. 

Field Spaniels. Limit dogs and bitches — 1 A. Bal- 
four's Inchkeith Billy, absent A. L. Stuart's Judge 
Casey. Open and winners dogs and bitches — 1 Inch- 
keith Billy. 

Cocker Spaniels. Puppy dogs, black — 1 D. P. 
Cresswell's Sir Saxon. Novice dogs, black — 1 Mr. 
Birch's Chub. Limit dogs, black — 1 Ben Razor's 
Razor's Runty. Open dogs, black — 1 Miss A. Wol- 
fen's Ch. Searchlight. Winners dogs — 1 Ch. Search- 
light, res Sir Saxon. Limit dogs, any color excepe 
black — Miss Kempf's Commodore Carrots, absent 
Ch. Redlight. Open dogs, parti-colored — 1 Alex Wol- 
fen's Ch. Gypsy Chief. Winners dogs, other than 
black — 1 Ch. Gypsy Chief, res Commodore Carrots. 
Puppy bitches, black — 1 D. P. Cresswell's Lady 
Saxon, 2 Geo. A. Neiborger's Creole Sue. Novice 
bitches, black — 1 Creole Sue. Limit bitches, black — 
1 Geo. A. Nieborger's Creole Belle. Open bitches, 
black — 1 A. L. Cresswell's Cressella Nancy, 2 Geo. 
A. Nieborger's Cricket. Winners bitches, black — 1 
Cressella Nancy, res Cricket. Limit bitches, any 
solid color except black — 1 A. E. Williams' Cleo. 
Open bitches, any solid color except black — 1 Geo. 
A. Nieborger's Patience, 2 Kingsley M. Stevens' 
Brownland Babbie, absent L. M. Whipples' Poin- 
setta. Winners bitches, any solid color except 
black — 1 Patience, res Brownland Babbie. 

Dachshundes. Novice dogs — 1 Mrs. W. W. Bur- 
nett's Largo. Limit dogs — 1 Largo. Open dogs — 1 
Mrs. Phil M. Wand's Ch. Dougie, 2 Largo. Winners 
dogs — 1 Ch. Dougie, res Largo. Open and winners 
bitches — 1 Mrs. Phil M. Wand's Nordica. 

Collies. Puppy dogs — 1 Wm. Ellery's Valverdo 

Watch, 2 D. H. Bibb's Tamal King. Junior dogs— 1 
Valverde Watch. Novice dogs — 1 Miss Viola Bles- 
ser's Dodge, 2 J. D. Calder's Scott I. Limit dogs — 

1 Robert Wallace's Dictator, 2 Wm. Ellery's Val- 
verde Veto, 3 Mrs. L. W. Seeley's Old Hall Sandy. 
Open dogs, bred by exhibitor — 1 Valverde Veto, 2 H. 
McCracken's Presidio Hero. Open dogs, bred in the 
United States— 1 Valverde Veto, 2 Old Hall Sandy. 
Open dogs, tri-color — 1 Dictator, absent Wm. Ellery's 
Wishaw Leader. Veteran dogs, over five years — 1 
Old Hall Sandy. Open dogs, and color — 1 Dictator, 

2 Valverde Veto, 3 Old Hall Sandy. Winners dogs— 1 
Dictator, res Valverde Watch. Puppy bitches — 1 Mrs. 
M. H. Warren's Easter Queen. Junior bitches, 
over 6 and under 18 months, bred in the United 
States — 1 S. Ducas' Ormskirk Queen. Novice 
bitches — 1 Easter Queen. Limit bitches — 1 Wm. El- 
lery's Valverde Venus, 2 Easter Queen. Open 
bitches, bred by exhibitor — 1 Valverde Venus. Open 
bitches, bred in the United States — 1 Valverde 
Venus, 2 H. McCracken's Presidio Paleface. Open 
bitches, air" rVor — 1 Valverde Venus. Winners 



bitches — 1 Valverde Venus, res Presidio Paleface. 
Curly Poodles. Novice dogs and bitches — 1 Thos. 

B. Eastland's Sunday B. Limit dogs and bitches — 1 
E. Tripod's Black. Open and winners dogs and 
bitches — 1 Black, 2 Sunday B. 

Dalmatians. Limit, open and winners dogs and 
bitches — 1 Arroyo Kennels' Arroyo Coquette. 

Bulldogs. Puppy dogs — 1 Mrs. A. Cellier's Margo's 
Mowgli. Limit dogs — 1 Dr. J. Auburn Wiburn's 
Walsingham Roy. 2 Bernon Ogden's Judge. 3 L S 
Greenbaum's Bull Durham, absent Chas. T. Crocker's 
Tam O'Shanter. Open dogs, bred in the United 
States — 1 Walsingham Roy. 2 Judge. 3 Bull Dur- 
ham, absent Tam O'Shanter. Open dogs — 1 Walsing- 
ham Roy. 2 Arroyo Kennels' Endcliffe Baron. 3 Bull 
Durham, absent Tam O'Shanter. Winners dogs — 
Walsingham Roy res Endcliffe Baron. Novice 
bitches — 1 Dr. T. Martin Smith's Freedom, absent 
Frank V. Grey's Leone Lilly. Limit bitches — 1 A. 
H. Hayes' Saint Queenie. 2 Freedom. Open bitches 
bred in the United States — 1 Freedom. Open and 
winners bitches — 1 Saint Queenie res Freedom. 

Airdale Terriers. Novice dogs — 1 Mrs. Henry 
Fischer's Bosco. Limit dogs — 1 Nat. T. Messer's 
Motor Dace. 2— Nat. T. Messer's Sandy Monk. 3 
Bosco. Open dogs — 1 Motor Dace. Winners dogs — 
1 Motor Dace res Sandy Monk. 

Bull Terriers. Puppy dogs — 1 Miss Louise Eas- 
ton's Wonderland Jim Woods. 2 C. McShane's Wild- 
wood Wizard. Novice dogs — 1 Wildwood Wizard. 
Limit dogs, over 30 lbs. — 1 E. P. Shortall's Silkwood 
Ben Ali, 2 Mrs. Horton F. Phipps' Brooklyn Patsy, 3 
John Cawkwell's Silkwood Surprise, absent G. Ward's 
Silkwood Gem. Open dogs, over 30 pounds — 1 Silk- 
wood Ben Ali. 2 Robt. Richard's Stiletto Tarquin. 
3 Silkwood Surprise, withdrawn Brooklyn Patsy. 
Open dogs, Coast bred — 1 Wildwood Wizard. Win- 
ners dogs — ISilkwood Ben Ali, res Wonderland Jim 
Woods. Novice bitches — 1 Mrs. Geo. Flexnor's 
Queen Bess. Limit bitches, not exceeding 30 
pounds — 1 Robt. A. Roos' Hartford Ted. Limit 
bitches, not exceeding 30 pounds — 1 Mrs. Frank 
Morris' Venoma Belle. Open bitches, not exceeding 
30 pounds — 1 Hartford Ted. Open bitches, exceeding 
30 pounds— 1 C. B. Gill's Silkwood Brassie, 2 Mrs. 
Geo. Flexnor's Lady Hazel, 3 J. Sparrow's Ch. 
Edgewood Jean II. Open bitches, Coast bred — 1 
Hartford Ted. Winners bitches — 1 Silkwood Bras- 
sy res Lady Hazel. 

French Bulldogs. Puppy dogs — Dr. G. A. Collins' 
Brackenside Count Desjardin. Novice dogs — - 
1 Brackenside Count Desjardin. Open dogs — lMrs. 
H. N. Cook's Ch. General De La Mare. 2 C. G. 
Cook and S. Postley's Loulou. Winners dogs — 1 Ch. 
General De La Mare, res Loulou. Novice bitches — 1 
Dr. J. Auburn Wiborn's D'Anglemont Fleurette, ab- 
sent Tosca D'Alfort. Open bitches — 1 D'Anglemont 
Fleurette, absent Tosca D'Alfort. Winners bitches 

1 D'Anglemont Fleurette. 

Boston Terriers. Novice dogs — 1 Miss Genevieve 
L. Harvey's Houdini. 2 D. S. Steele's Spot Steele. 
3 V. Whitney'sJohnnie. Limit dogs, 12 and under 
17 pounds — 1 A. H. Hayes' Ranier Dick. Limit dogs, 
17 and under 22 por.nds — 1 Miss Jennie A. Crocker's 
Frisco Cinders, 2 Spot Steels. Limit dogs, 22 and 
under 28 pounds — 1 Arroyo Kennels' Arroyo Auto- 
crat. 2 Houdini. 3 Johnnie. Open dogs, 12 and 
under 17 pounds — 1 Ranier Dick. Open dogs — 17 and 
under 20 pounds — 1 Miss Jennie A. Crocker's Ch. 
Dick Dazzler, 2 Frisco Cinders, 3 Spot Steele. Open 
dogs, 22 and under 28 pounds — 1 Arroyo Autocrat. 

2 Houdini. 3 Johnnie. Winning dogs — ICh Dick 
Dazzler res Frisco Cinders. "Novice bitches — -1 Dr. 
T. Martin Smith's Eldora Necco. 2 Arroyo Kennels' 
Arroyo Affiliate. 3 Miss Jennie A. Crocker's Wonder- 
land Venus, res Miss Jennie A. Crocker's Little 
Mother, v h c. Mrs. Ella F. Morgan's Vixen III, 
v h c. P. L. Harley's Moxie M., he. Arroyo Ken- 
nels' Arroyo Alternate, c W. C. Adams' Girl. Limit 
bitches — 1 Arroyo Affiliate. 2 Arroyo Alternate, ab- 
sent EI Mundo Kennels' Dolly Varden. Limit 
bitches, 17 and under 22 pounds — 1 Miss Jennie A. 
Crocker's Clancy III. 2 Eldora Necco. 3 Wonder- 
land Venus, res Moxie M. Limit bitches, 22 and under 
28 pounds — 1 Little Mother. Open bitches, 17 and 
under 22 pounds — 1 Miss JennieA Crocker's Ch End- 
cliffe Tortora. 2 Clancy III. 3 Wonderland Venus. 
Open bitches, 22 and under 28 pounds — 1 Little 
Mother. Winners bitches — 1 Ch Endciffe Tortora, 
res Clancy III. 

Fox Terriers. (Smooth coated.) Puppy dOgs — 1 
W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac Smasher. Novice dogs 
— 1 Tallac Smasher. 2 W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac 
Brush. Limit dogs — 1 Irving C. Ackennan's Sabine 
Rasper, 2 W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac Marlin, 3 W. 
W. Stettheimer's Tallac Casino, absent Tallac Ox- 
ford. Open dogs bred in the United States — 1 Sa- 
bine Rasper. Open dogs — 1 Sabine Rasper. 2 W. 
W. Stettheimer's Wander Resist. Winner dogs — 1 
Sabine Rasper res Tallac Marlin. Puppy bitches — 1 
W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac Echo. Novice bitches 
— 1 VV.W. Stettheimer's Tallac Orchid. 2 W. W. 
Stettheimer's Tallac Lakebreeze. Limit bitches — 1 
W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac Sunbeam. 2 W. W. 
Stettheimer's Tallac Sprite. Open bitches — 1 W. 
W. Stettheimer's Tallac Seabreeze. 2 W. W. Stett- 
heimer's Tallac Dusky Lassie. Winners bitches — 1 
Tallac Sunbeam, res Tallac Seabreeze. 

Fox Terriers. (Wire haired.) Limit dogs — 1 Irving 

C. Ackerman's Humberstnne Penance. 2 J. Oliver's 
Humberstone Jack. Open dogs bred in the United 
States — 1 Humberstone Penance. Open dogs — 1 
Humberstone Penance. 2 Humberstone Jack. Win- 
ners dogs — 1 Humberstone Penance, res Humberstone 
Jack. Novice bitches — 1 J. Oliver's Humberstone 



Nellie. Open bitches — 1 Irving C. Ackerman's Ch 
Endcliffe Precise. Winners bitches — 1 Ch. Endcliffe 
Precise res Humberstoae Nellie. 

Pomeranians. Limit dogs and bitches over 8 
pounds — 1 Miss Frances M. Reid's Baby. 2 Miss 
Francis M. Reid's Rollo. Open dogs and bitches 
over 8 pounds — absent Miss G Sonnenfeld's Hum- 
berstone Masher. Open dogs and bitches over 8 
pounds — 1 Baby. 2 Rollo. Winners dogs and 
bitches — 1 Baby res Rollo. 

Yorkshire Terriera Open dogs and bitches — 1 
Mrs. F A Woodworth's Cahooto. 

Pekinese Spaniels. Limit dogs and bitches — 1 
Miss Margaret Barron's Little Pao Ki. Open dogs 
and bitches — 1 Miss Margaret Barron's Shi Li. 

Japanese Spaniels. Open dogs and bitches — ab- 
sent Robison Bros' Yeddo. 

Toy Poodles. Open dogs and bitches — 1 Mrs. Chas. 
Pat ton's Jeanette, absent Robison Bros' Cresta 
Blanca. 

Toy Terriers. Limit, open and winners dogs and 
bitches — 1 Robison Bros' Tutsiliffe. 

Italian Greyhounds. Open dogs and bitches — 1 
Cummings and Deane's Ch Dude. 2 Cummings 
and Deane's Ch Duke II. 

Special Awards. 

Cup for best in the show — Miss Jennie A. Crock- 
er's Boston Terrier Ch Endcliffe Tortora, reserve, 
I. C. Ackerman's smooth Fox Terrier Humberstone 
Penance. 

Club cup for best American Foxhound — Hon. Car- 
roll Cook's Ch. Ned. 

Club cup for best Pointer— A. Balfour's Senator's 
Jack. Club trophy for best of opposite sex — H. B. 
Townsend's Walla Walla Rush. 

G. W. Ellery cup for best English Setter— V. 
Kuehn's Malwyd Beau. Club cup for best of oppo- 
site sex — M. Manning's Lady Dorrie M. 

Club cup for best Gordon Setter — A. L. Stuart's 
Ch Doc Watson. Club cup for best of opposite 
sex — H. B. Knox's Sis. 

Club cup for best Irish Setter— R. H. Grove's St. 
Lambert Phyllis. Club cup for best of opposite sex — 
R. H. Grove's Phil Law. 

Club cup for best Irish Water Spaniel — Frisco 
Kennels' Frisco Dot. 

Club cup for best Field Spaniel — A. Balfour's 
Inchkeith Billy. 

Cup for best Cocker Spaniel — Miss A. Wolfen's 
Ch. Searchlight. Club cup for best of opposite sex — 
A. L. Cresswell's Crescella Nancy. Club cup for best 
of opposite color to winner — Geo. A. Neiborger's Pa- 
tience. Club cup for best puppy — D. P. Cresswell's 
Sir Saxon. California Crocker Club medals for best 
dog — Ch. Searchlight; best bitch, Crescella Nancy. 

Club cup for best Dachshunde— Mrs. Phil. M. 
Wand's Ch Dougie. 

Nathan, Dohrmann & Co. trophy for best Collie — 
R. Wallace's Dictator. Club trophy for best of 
opposite sex — Wm. Ellery's Valverde Venus. 

Club cup for best Curly Poodle — E. Tripod's Black. 

S. F. Kennel Club cup for best Bulldog— Dr. J. 
Auburn Wiburn's Walsingham Roy. Miss Jennie 
A. Crocker cup for best of opposite sex — A. H. 
Hayes' Saint Queenie. Cup for best pupp> — Mrs. 
A. Cellier's Margo's Mowgli. 

Club cup for best Airedale — Nat. T. Messer's 
Motor Dace. 

Irving C. Ackerman cup for best Bull Terrier — E. 
P. Shortall's Silkwood Ben AH. Robison Bros.' 
trophy for best of opposite sex — C. B. Gill's Silk- 
wood Brassie. Club cup for best novice — Mrs. Geo. 
Flexnor's Queen Bess. 

Club cup for best French Bulldog — Mrs. H. N. 
Cook's Ch. General De La Mare. 

Chas. K. Harley cup for best Boston Terrier — 
Miss Jennie A. Crocker's Ch. Endcliffe Tortora. 
Cup for best of opposite sex — Miss Jennie A. 
Crocker's Ch. Dick Dazzler. W. W. Stetthelmer cup 
for best in novice class — Dr. T. M. Smith's Eldora 
Necco. 

Chas. K. Harley cup for best smooth Fox Terrier 
— Irving C. Ackerman's Sabine Rasper. Club cup 
for best of opposite sex — W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac 
Sunbeam. American Fox Terrier Club cup for best 
smooth American or Canadian bred — Sabine Rasper 
Cup for best American or Canadian bred novice dog 
— W. W. Stettheimer's Tallac Smasher. Cup for 
best American or Canadian bred novice bitch — 
Tallac Orchid. 

Club prize for best wire-haired Fox Terrier — L C. 
Ackennan's Humberstone Penance. Club cup for 
best of opposite sex — 1 I. C. Ackerman's Ch. End- 
cliffe Precise. 

Club cup for best Pomeranian — Miss F. M. Reid's 
Baby. 

Club cup for best Yorkshire — Mrs. F. A. Wood- 
worth's Cahooto. 

Club cup for best Pekinese Spaniel — Miss Margaret 
Barron's Shi Li. 

Club cup for best Toy Terrier — Robison Bros.' 
Tutsiliffe. 

Club cup for best Italian Greyhound — Cummings 
and Deane's Ch Dude. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



Review. 

The initial bench show of the Del Monte Kennel 
Club, held Saturday, January 4th, was, taking in con- 
sideration the time of the year and other conditions, 
a very successful affair. In fact, indications for 
well patronized bench shows at Del Monte in the 
future were so promising that announcement has 
been made that another show will be held next 
August. 

It would be difficult to find, on the Pacific Coast, 
a more pleasing and suitable place to hold a one- 
day bench show. The Del Monte Hotel and its 
paiatial accommodations are too well known for 
extended description here. As an outing trip this 
affords an opportunity not equalled anywhere. Spe- 
cial hotel rates and railroad fares induced a large 
attendance of the fancy from San Francisco and 
other points. The show was also well patronized 
by society people, a number of our society leaders 
were exhibitors and took an active interest in the 
success of the show. 

The judging was first started in the large stable, 
a change was quicky made to the lawn in front 
where two rings were arranged. After luncheon the 
balance of the classes were judged in rings on the 
grassy lawn of the golf links. In other words, there 
was just so much more interest and a greater at- 
tendance than had been anticipated and arranged 
for. Weather conditions were pleasant and agree- 
able to spectators and exhibitors and comfortable 
for the dogs. 

The total number of dogs shown was 156 (16 ab- 
sentes). The total class entries were 252. The 
large breeds were not in evidence, this being the first 
Coast show in many years where we have noticed 
the absence of St. Bernards, Great Danes, Mastiffs. 
Greyhounds, etc. What was lacking in numbers 
was more than made up in quality, for on general 
average this show will compare favorably with any 
of our previous shows. The judging was by home 
talent and, in general, was satisfactory. 
Mr. W. E. Chute's classes were: 
American Foxhounds, six entered, a better lot than 
usually seen. Ch. Ned in for specials only, won 
over Judge, Dante first puppies is a very workman- 
like youngster that will improve. 

Pointers, four shown, Walla Walla Rush the best. 
Senator's Jack (son of Ch. Senator P.), is a bit too 
light. Mike Geary has the body and legs but is 
lacking in head finish. A Doc Daniels' bitch Doc's 
Fan is a stylish acting, seven months old one that 
should prove a good worker to the gun. 

English Setters, nine entered. Mallwyd Beau, a 
well-finished young dog went over Tiverton, who 
showed the wear and tear of upland work this sea- 
son. Beau is a dog that will go at any show. Three 
puppies were excellent. In bitches Lady Dorrie M., 
a litter sister of Beau, won out easily, and is a 
classy young bitch. Ch. Sue Gladstone was absent. 

Gordon Setters, three in number, were old famili- 
ars and not overly good. 

Irish Setters, five shown, were of good averaging 
quality. St. Lambert Phyllis, a new comer to the 
Coast, %cu out for best shown; she is an even, 
well-finished bitch. 

Cocker Spaniels, isxteen entered, were a strong 
entry. Ch. Searchlight, put down in good fettle, won 
out for best in blacks. Sir Saxon, first puppies and 
reserve winners, is one of the best looking young- 
sters benched for some time. In bitches Cressella 
Nancy and Cricket came together again, Nancy win- 
ning the tri-color and special. Lady Saxon, litter 
sister of Sir Saxon, is also a most promising puppy. 
Creole Sue, second puppies and firts novice blacks, 
a six-months'-old Ch. Lucky puppy, is good for her 
age and will improve. In parti-colors Ch. Gypsy 
Chief was alone. In reds Ch. Redlight was absent, 
leaving the way clear for Patience to win special 
for best, also first winners over Brownland Babbie, 
reversing the Stockton placing. 

Dachshundes, three good ones shown, the old fami- 
liars Ch. Dougie and Nordica taking the principal 
honors. Largo, a son of Ch. Venlo Rorever, bears 
the hall mark of his good sire. 

Collies, thirteen entered, were an excellent all- 
round showing. Dictator won over Valverde Watch 
just on a margin of coat, Wishaw Leader being ab- 
sent. Old Hall Sandy was put down in better condi- 
tion than we ever saw him before. In bitches, Val- 
verde Venus had a walkover. 

Bulldogs, ten entered, introduced three new ones — 
Walsingham Roy, Saint Queenie and Freedom. Roy, 
a grey brindle, annexed the special and firsts for 
dogs. He is a well balanced dog with a pleasing 
head and front, good spring of ribs and loins that 
are properly tucked. Endcliffe Baron, Judge, Bull 
Durham and Margo's Mowgli are familiar benchers. 
In bitches the race was between Saint Queenie and 
Freedom, both good looking red brindles, the latter 
is too low stationed in front. Queenie won out on 
body and legs. 

Fox Terriers, fourteen smooths entered, were a 
pleasing class. Sabine Rasper carried the Humber- 
stone colors to the front in dogs and Tallac Sun- 
beam, with a kennel mate, Tallac Seabreeze, put 
Tallac Kennels in the van for bitches. 

Fox Terriers, nine wires shown (Ch. H. Bristles, 
Ch. H. Brittle, Ch. H. Mearns, Ch. H. Record 
and Ch. H. Hope in for exhibition only), were 
a good all-round lot. H. Penance easily won over 
Jack in dogs. In bitches Endcliffe Precise, although 
heavy in whelp to Mearns, retains her style and 
quality to a degree. 



The Ladies' Variety Class had eight entries. The 
order of awards was: 1 Miss Jennie A. Crocker's 
Ch. Endcliffe Tortora, Boston Terrier (cup for best 
in class); 2 Mrs. H. N. Cook's Ch. General De 
La Mare, French Bulldog; 3 Mrs. Geo. Flexnor's 
Lady Hazel, Bull Terrier; 4 Miss Kempfs Commo- 
dore Carrots, Cocker; 5 Mrs. L. W. Seeley's Old 
Hall Sandy, Collie. Absent Mrs. Horton F. Phipps' 
Brooklyn Patsy, Bull Terrier. 

The special for best in the show was finally 
awarded to Ch. Endcliffe Tortora. Humberstone 
Penance reserve. 

Mr. Phil M. Wand's classes were: 

Italian Greyhounds, two shown, both excellent spe- 
cimens. 

Irish Water Spaniels, two shown. Firsco Dot, a 
new bitch here, going over Our Chance Jr. on coat 
and general substance. Both are excellent specimens 
and would be in the ribbons at any show. 

Field Spaniels, Inchkeith Billy, the only one in, 
is a much better Spaniel than our shows generally 
produce. 

Airedales, Motor Dace was the best one of three 
shown. He has the size and type dstred. 

Variety Brace Class, three braces entered. Miss 
Jennie A. Crocker's Bostons, Ch. Endcliffe Tortora 
and Ch. Dick Dazzler were placed over the Fox- 
hound and Collie braces — Judge and Ned; V. Veto 
and V. Venus. 

Mr. Irving C. Ackerman's classes were: 

Boston Terriers, eighteen entered, were a classy 
lot. Ch. Dick Dazzler and Frisco Cinders were one, 
two in winners dogs and Ch. Endcliffe Tortora and 
Clancy III led in bitches, the principal awards and 
specials going to Wonderland entries. Rainier Dick 
was shown in better condition than at Stockton. 

In novice bitches Vixen III, v h c was possibly very 
much overlooked. She was entitled to a higher posi- 
tion. Eldora Necco is a neat bitch, a newcomer, by 
the way, but is a bit too low in front and might be 
fuller in muzzle. Clancy III. has matured into a 
symmetrical and typy looking young bitch. 

Dalmatians, one shown, and a better specimen 
than usually benched, Arroyo Coquette, owned in 
Pasadena. 

Poodles, two entered, with honors easy for Black, 
possibly the best Curly Poodle on the Coast. 

French Bulldogs, a class of merit and an indica- 
tion that the breed is picking up here. Ch. General 
De La Mare and Loulou, both veteran benchers, 
were one, two in dogs. Brackenside Count Desjardin 
is a puppy of pleasing type. D'Anglemonte Fleurette 
is an evenly set up one that should do well on the 
bench and as a brood bitch. 

The small breeds were few in numbers, and of 
no particular extra merit. Two Poms., one York- 
shire, two Pekinese Spaniels, two Toy Poodles and 
one Toy Terrier, Tutsiliffe, of which, it can be 
said, is a bit better than seen at our shows. 

Variety Team Class had two entries — Judge Car- 
roll Cook's team of Foxhounds, Judge, Ch. Ned, 
Prince Louis and Queen, placed first, and W. W. 
Stettheimer's Fox Terriers, Tallac Marlin, Wandee 
Resist, Tallac Seabreeze and Tallac Orchid. 

Mr. J. J. Gleason judged the classes of: 

Bull Terriers, thirteen entered, and a well rated 
lot. The interest centered in the competition be- 
tween Silkwood Ben Ali and Brooklyn Patsy. They 
came together in limit, over 30 pounds, and when 
they were in right ascension the solar system was 
dimmed. The judge finally awarded the blue to 
Ali, a decision that was well received by the large 
audience about the ring. Ali was in splendid fettle 
and handled by his breeder, John Sparrow. He 
passes Patsy in head, muzzle and lips, neck and 
shoulders, and does not carry his tail as gaily as 
Patsy when shown around the ring. Patsy was 
withdrawn from further competition after the first 
round. This brought a very likely puppy, Wonder- 
land Jim Woods, up to reserve winners. The dog 
classes were all excellent and above the average. 
In bitches Silkwood Brassie could not be denied the 
red, white and blue and special. Lady Hazel, reserve 
winners was in excellent trim, in fact, the bitch 
entries were the equal of the opposite sex in class 
and quality. A more even and excellent benching of 
Bull Terriers is rarely seen at any show. 

o 

DOINGS IN DOGOOM. 



Chas. Gilbert was a painstaking and efficient super- 
intendent at Del Monte. Tom Blight was unavoid- 
ably absent. 



Mr. Geo. F. Herr, Dr. and Mrs. Geo. A Collins of 
Angeles were present at Del Monte. 



Mr. Herr is energetically working up the Los 
Angeles show for next month, if a report of the 
support the Southwestern Kennel Club will receive 
from Frisco and fanciers of the viciuity is any cri- 
terion Mr. Herr's enthusiastic and sportsmanlike 
efforts have met with a popular recognition. 



It would not be an overplay by stating that 40 or 
more dogs will be sent down to the orange belt 

show. 



A. Wolfen's Cocker bitch Plumeria Sapho whelped 
on January 4th a litter by Ch. Redlight 



The trophies and cups awarded at the Del Monte 
show were presented to the winners by Hon. Carroll 
Cook on Saturday evening, in the foyer of the Del 
Monte Hotel. 



Mr. C. W. Clark donated a cup .valued at $100 to 
be awarded the best in the show. This trophy was 
Won by Ch. Sndcliffe Tortora. The Larson gold 
medal for best in the largest breed entry (Boston 
Terriers) was also awarded Tortora. 



The California Circuit this season promises to be 
a lively one. The show germ has developed into 
a colony that will give us at least nine shows this 

year. 



Pasadena is a fixture for February 13 and 14. 
Judges not yet announced. 



Los Angeles follows with a four-day show com- 
mencing February 19th. The judges announced are: 
Messrs. Irving C. Ackerman, Norman J Stewart, 
John Brown, Jas Ewins and Chas. K. Harley. Mr. 
Haiiey will be East at the time of the show, how- 
ever. His classes — Fox Terriers, Irish Terriers and 
American Foxhounds will be judged by a judge to 
be selected by the Bench Show Committee. 



Santa Rosa, it is reported, will hold a show on 
the 6th and 7th of March. This doggy function is 
under the guidance of Judge Carroll Cook, which 
means that the show is practically a fixture and 
that the specials and other details will be of so satis- 
factory a character that a large entry is assured. 
His Honor is the kind of timber that will build up 
and hold dogdom in general. 



The judges for Santa Rosa will be a selection of 
home talent. We should not be surprised if Dr. 
Sharpies of Seattle and Frank E. Watkins of Port- 
land were seen in the rings. 



Oakland is dated for the end of March. It is pos- 
sible that the East will be drafted upon for the 
judicial feature of the exhibition. The finger of 
selection, rumor has it, points towards the Hub. 



San Francisco is dated for the end of April. The 
annual bugbear, a suitable hall, has been effectually 
handled, the Auditorium Rink having been engaged. 
By the way, no better hall could have been secured, 
both for convenience and location, than the build- 
ing on Page and Fillmore streets. 



The judge for San Francisco has been announced, 
but from what we can gather the announcement was 
premature, as no engagement to make the awards 
has yet been consummated. 



Del Monte will show again in August. It will be 
a whopper. 



Tanforan is spoken of by several enthusiasts as 

the scene of a show this year. 



San Mateo Kennel Club will show as usual on 
September 9th. Reports are current that either 
Frank Dole or George Thomas will judge. 



Venice will probably close the show circuit with 
a show in the oceanside pavilion, late in September. 



C. H. Cook has had the misfortune to lose his 
good French Bull bitch Margot de Pantin. She died 
in whelping a litter of five by Ch. General De La 
Mare. The puppies are thriving in charge of a 
foster mother. 



A stylish and well bred Pointer bitch puppy 
awaits a purchaser at a reasonable price; address 
of the owner can be obtained from the Kennel 
Editor. 



The report that Glenwood Lucky was located in a 
Southern California kennels was not correct. Lucky 
is at present in this city and owned by Chas. Gil- 
bert. He is the sire of a recent litter of five nice, 
black puppies out of Jollie Fille. 



A recent report coming from Perth, West Aus- 
tralia, to the effect that an exploring expedition 
in the Northwest regions of Australia has discovered 
a species of dog the size of a rat, is of special in- 
terest to dog fanciers. The smallest full grown dog 
in the world, it is claimed, is a two-year-old Chi- 
huahua, owned by Deputy Sheriff Hamilton Rayner 
of El Paso, Texas. The Chihuahua is a breed raised 
in Mexico, where they are said to be growing 
scarce. The English Toy Pomeranian is probably 
the smallest popular European breed of the day. 
Many prize specimens, although full grown, weigh 
only forty-eight ounces, and occasionally a ma- 
tured female is reported to scale only forty ounces. 
The once fairly numerous Toy Black and Tan Ter- 
rier, averaged under three pounds. Speculation is 
rife as to the type of animal the newly discovered 
miniature Western Australian dog is. 

o 

Riverside county has been promised by the Fish 
Commissioners black bass fry for Lake Elsinore, 
should that location prove favorable for the fish. 
Trout fry are to be transplanted in the streams 
of Coldwater Canyon and also in Strawberry Creek. 

The Commission also propose to place Hungarian 
pheasants at a location in the county where they 
will propagate and thrive, using this ground as a 
nucleus for future liberation of the birds in sur- 
rounding counties. 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE B REEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 1 



EASY METHOD OF BREAKING COLTS. 



The secret of management of a horse is to know 
what is going on in his mind. Most of us approach- 
ing a wild horse approach him with an insult. We 
do not think about it, but that is what we do. Now, 
mark you, there is nothing that so insults a wild 
horse as to handle his nose or his ears, yet, nine 
men out of ten approach a horse with a halter the 
first thing. They insult him, and after that they 
have to begin to prove to the horse that they are 
not his' enemies, and they begin at a disadvantage. 

This method of handling a wild horse without put- 
ting anything on its head was evolved by experi- 
ence with a yearling half-bred Western colt. I had 
a halter on his head and had tied him to a fence. 
I ran my hand down his neck and toward his knee. 
He struck at me. It would not do any good to whip 
him. He would not understand what he was being 
whipped for. He was too big for me to hold his foot, 
whether he wanted it held or not. I stepped into 
the barn, got a rope and slipped the noose over his 
fetlock joint, then pulled the foot toward me. It was 
but a few moments until I could handle that foot. 
I went further back and he kicked at me. I then 
put the rope on his hind foot, ran it forward be- 
tween his forelegs and attached it to his halter. 
Then I went back on him again, and when he kicked 
at me he nearly kicked his head off. He soon 
grasped the idea that it was easier for him to led 
me handle him than it was to kick. 

When I have a wild horse to handle I put him 
through such a course of "sprouts" that he will 
understand that I am his master. Put the wild horse 
in a box stall or other small enclosure. Get a rope 
and make a noose as for lassooing Enter the stall 
and the horse will move over as far as he can, prob- 
ably trying to crawl under the door. You know how 
anxious a wild horse is to get his freedom. If you 
walk in one direction the colt will walk in the other. 
Now lay your noose upon the floor and walk the colt 
around till he steps in it with his left fore foot. Let 
the rope slip up to the fetlock joint and then hold 
on tight. When the colt feels the rope on his foot 
he will try to shake it off, but do not let him do it. 
If he gets it off once he will spend half of your time 
thereafter trying to get it off again. You can never 
convince him that it can be done. If his attention 
is divided between you and getting that rope off 
he will waste half of your time, so be careful and 
do not let him get the rope off. Pull his foot toward 
you and do not led him put it down squarely, as he 
has done for four or five years, if he is as old as 
that. You pull on the rope and make him set it 
down eight or ten inches from where it normally 
would be. He will say that he is not going to do it 
and will shake his foot and run around, determined 
that he will not put his foot down; but after a while 
he will get so tired that he will have to. The mo- 
ment he puts his foot down at the place you select 
you have gained your first victory. You have taught 
him that you will have your way and you have 
neither hurt him nor scared him. 

Now approach him. Put your hand on his shoulder. 
Never mind his head, neck or nose. If he will not 
let you touch his shoulder, pull the rope and he will 
find that he has to take his choice between your 
pulling on the rope and your putting your hand on 
his shoulder; between having your hand on his 
shoulder and his feet off the ground. He has learned 
more about men than he ever knew before and he 
has learned nothing bad about them. As soon as he 
'will stand still and let you run your hand down his 
shoulder, gather up the rope, keeping it tight all 
the time, so that the colt cannot get it off, and 
throw the loose end of it over his back. He will 
jump and run, but you can soon convince him by 
pulling on the rope that it is unpleasant to run. 
He is doing most of the work, lie is at the outside 
of the stall and you are in the center. Now gather 
up the rope and throw it over his back again. Again 
he must take his choice between your throwing the 
rope over his back and your pulling on his foot. 
Then bring the rope under him and be sure to pass 
it in front of the perpendicular portion of the rope 
fast to his foot, because if the rope, as you pass it 
around his body, is brought across behind the per- 
pendicular rope and the colt should succeed at any 
time in getting in front of you the rope would pull 
right off over his tail and you would have to begin 
all over again. 

Now you are ready to show him another thing or 
two. Unless he is a very large horse you can hold up 
his foot at any time you want to. P>y this time he 
has reached the point where, if you want him to 
move you must force him to do so. Many a smart 
horse will bore a hole in the ground with that foot 
rather than lift it. Now pull his foot right up. He 
will rear and plunge. That is worse than having 
his foot pulled to one side, but he will soon learn 
that he must stand quiet. As soon as he is quiet let 
his foot down. He has learned that it is unpleasant 
for him if he does not do as you want him to. 

Now get a collar — not a new one, smelling of a 
lot of things that are strange to the colt, but an old 
one, preferably one that has been used by some 
horse that he knows. Bring the collar to him and 
put it on. If he objects pull that foot up. It will be 
but a moment till he decides that he would rather 
have the collar on than to have his foot pulled up. 
You can now put the harness on him just as you 
would an old horse. • Do not stand off as though he 
were a kicking cow but walk right up to him, throw 
the harness over him, and if he moves or runs out 



walk behind him and put the crupper strap on. 
His attention is riveted on that foot. He will neither 
bite, strike nor kick. You will be surprised to see 
how anxious he is about that foot. You can bridle 
him any time you want to. 

Now you need another piece of rope, which ought 
to be nine or ten feet long and three-quarters of an 
inch thick, and two iron rings such as are in the 
ends of the breching of a single harness. Make a 
loop in the end of this rope, a loop that will not 
slip; then tie two rings on to the rope about ten 
inches apart and so placed that when this rope is 
passed around the horse and the rings are under 
him the loop will be around on the off side. Tie 
this rope right around the horse. Get a couple of 
name-straps and two more rings. Buckle one hanic- 
strap around each fore fetlock with a ring in the 
strap. You now have a ring fastened to each fet- 
lock joint and two rings on the rope around the 
horse's body. Take the loose end of the foot rope, 
of course all the time keeping it tight in your hand, 
and slip it through the ring on the horse's body that 
is nearest to you, then down through the ring that 
is at the fetlock joint, back to the other ring at the 
horse's body to the ring at the other fetlock joint, 
and then tie to the noose on the off side of the body. 
Take the other end of the rope off. 

Now, if you pull this rope when the horse is in ac- 
tion, you will pull both feet right up to his body. Do 
not go out of the door with control over only one 
foot. The horse can run faster on three feet than 
you can on two. You are not likely to have to throw 
the colt after you get outside, for a slight pull on 
the tightened rope will stop him. If you have not 
yet put the bridle on him you may do so at this 
time, or drive him with the rope alone. You can 
shoo him around like an old hen; he will be more 
quiet than many old hens. 

Now get your quiet old horse that you break your 
colts beside; stand him on the left side of the 
tongue; hitch up the traces and neckyoke; then go 
and pick up the rope that is on the colt; hitch him 
beside the old horse and drive off. — Chicago Horse- 
man. 

o 

HIGH DEATH RATE IN NEW YORK. 



Statistics on file in the department of Health 
show an astonishing number of fatalities among 
horses in New York during the year just closed. 
Though the records are not yet complete it is certain 
that the number of deaths will exceed 20,000, and in 
all probability it will reach 22,000. In the nine 
months ending September 30 there were 16,678 
deaths, and if this rate be maintained during the 
three months ending December 31, no iess than 
22,236 horses will have succumbed to accident, dis- 
ease, debility, ill treatment and old age in 1907. 

It is impossible to ascertain or even closely esti- 
mate the death rate per thousand among the city's 
horses, because no one knows how many horses there 
are in New York, but men in closest touch with the 
equine population say that the rate of mortality is 
undoubtedly increasing and is probably higher today 
than at any time iu the history of the metropolis, ex- 
cept in periods of epidemic, such as the deadly epi- 
zootic of thirty-five years ago. 

Slippery pavements in winter and extreme heat in 
summer are two of the chief causes of mortality 
among the horses. A well-known New York dealer 
has estimated that one hundred or more break their 
legs or are otherwise fatally injured every day on 
icy asphalt during the rough weather in winter. 
Pneumonia and colds caused by exposure are al- 
most equally fatal to horses at this season. 

At first blush it seems like a far cry from the 
panic in Wall street to the increased death rate 
among horses, yet one of the shrewdest observers 
in the Bull's Head market said the other day to a 
reporter for the Herald that one was largely the 
effect of the other. 

"A great many horse owners, finding themselves 
very hard up as a result of the financial 
disturbances and the consequent loss of busi- 
ness," he explained, "are curtailing expenses in every 
possible way, and, with feed selling at unprecedented 
prices, large numbers of them are almost starving 
their horses while making one team do the work of 
two. Aside from being inhuman, this is a very 
costly thing to do, for when a horse is underfed and 
overworked at the same time he is going to give out 
quickly and completely, either through contracting 
pneumfinia or through becoming emaciated. From 
what I have seen and heard I am convinced that 
thousands of horses are dying off this winter from 
just this cause. 

Great as the fatalities are in winter they are some- 
times far greater in the summer months. It is on 
record that during a memorable hot spell in 1896 
more than 1,200 horses died in one week in New 
York. Overloading and overdriving often add great- 
ly to the fatal effects of extreme heat and extreme 
cold. 

Although no attention is paid to mortality statist- 
ics, as such, for any kind of animals, the Health 
Departments records respecting deaths among 
horses in New York are probably as accurate as 
those concerning human being. They are obtained 
from the Thomas W. White Company, a corporation 
which for years has had the contract for removing 
the dead horses in the city. There is no burying 
ground for horses, and as no one nowadays follows 
the example of Commodore Vanderbilt, who made a 
grave in his own dooryard in Washington Square 



for his favorite trotter, Mountain Boy 2:20%, many 
years ago, equine kings and paupers find a last 
resting place together at Barren Island, where the 
White people have their fertilizer plant. As all 
the dead horses are collected by this concern, its 
weekly reports to the Health Department accurately 
reflect the number of fatalities. 

When a horse dies, all that the owner has to do 
is to telepohne to White's and in short order a 
wagon is sent around to remove the animal, free of 
cost. If, as often happens, a live horse, no longer 
valuable except for his skin and bones, is led down 
to the dead horse dock and shot, the Whites pay the 
owner two dollars for him. Hundreds of these worn 
out "skinners" find their way to the foot of West 
Thirty-ninth street, "where their whip-scored hides 
soon cease to smart and their aching limbs grow 
numb." 

Once or twice a day a barge goes down the river, 
across the bay and out to Barren Island freighted 
with a gruesome cargo. There a use is found for 
every part of a dead horse. His hide is turned into 
leather belting, his bones into jackknife handles, 
combs, etc.; his teeth into ivory ornaments, his 
mane and tail into hair cloth, his hoofs into glue, 
his fat into soap-grease and what then remains of 
his carcass into fertilizer for enriching the soil. 

o 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 



The stewards of the Grand Circuit will meet in 
New York January 13 to determine on the tracks 
that shall be included in the big chain of meeting 
for the light-harness horse during the season of 
1908. It is practically assured that the Cleveland 
Driving Park Company will not give a meeting next 
season and unless some other Cleveland club comes 
to the front there will be no Grand Circuit meeting 
at the Forest City. 

Detroit is also somewhat in doubt for the reason 
that Daniel J. Campau, the man who has managed 
the big trotting meetings there for many years, an- 
nounces that he positively will not be identified 
with the sport next season. This will mean a 
change of tracks even though a meeting is given. 

Kalamazoo, Libertyville and Lima are three ap- 
plicants for places, so there is no question about 
the strength of the Grand Circuit in case Cleveland 
and Detroit do both drop out. The Libertyville meet- 
ing preceded the opening of the Grand Circuit last 
year, and many horses that started at Detroit were 
given their first races at Libertyville. It was there 
that Highball made his record of 2: 06% in his first 
start, beating Sonoma Girl, and it was also there 
that the great gelding met his first defeat, losing to 
the speedy California mare in a second race over 
the same track the following week. 

Kalamazoo was hot for a place in the Grand Cir- 
cuit last year and would gladly accept dates ahead 
of Detroit in case the latter holds onto the week 
usually assigned for the Blue Ribbon meeting. Lib- 
ertyville would naturally come in ahead of Kala- 
mazoo, and Lima, is admitted, would have to take 
the place usually assigned Cleveland. 

From Buffalo the circuit will very likely be about 
the same as last year — Poughkeepsie, Readville, 
Providence, Hartford, Syracuse and Columbus, the 
latter with a two weeks' meeting. 

There should be a chance for Philadelphia to get 
into the circuit, taking one of the weeks given Co- 
lumbus, but so far no one has come to the front with 
the necessary amount of backing. It is believed that 
a first class trotting and pacing meeting conducted 
on up-to-date lines would prove a winner at either 
of the Philadelphia tracks, particularly at Point 
Breeze, because of the good transportation facilities, 
but there would, of course, be some risks. A strictly 
first class meeting carried out successfully this year 
regardless of losses, would insure a money-maker the 
years following, for Philadelphia is one of the best 
horse towns in the country, and all that Is neces- 
sary to bring out the people is to convince them that 
they are getting the best that is to be had. A sec- 
ond class meeting would pay no better than those 
that have been held there heretofore. — Stock Farm. 

o 

THE CAUSE OF THE SMASH-UP. 



The old darky was suing the railroad company 
for damages. The man contended that, not being 
warned by the whistle or engine bell, he had started 
to drive his rig across the company's track, when 
a shunted box car of said company crashed into his 
outfit, causing the death of the horse, loss of the 
wagon, and minor injuries to himself. After the 
prosecution had closed its side of the case the com- 
pany's lowyer called the old darky to the sand 
and went at him. 

"Mr. Lamson," he began, "your rig was struck by 
the box car in full daylight, was it not?" 

"I fink dar was some clouds overhead, sun," 
answered the cavilling witness. 1 

"Never mind the clouds! And only a few days 
before the accident the railroad company had put 
a new sign at the crossing?" 

"Dar was a sign dar, ya-as suh!" 

"And didn't that sign say 'Stop! Look! Listen?'" 

Now, dar am the whol' accusation ub de trouble!" 
said the witness with animation. "If that Stop sign 
hadn't caught dis chile's eye jes' 's he war squar' 
on dat track, dar wouldn't 'a been no smash-up!" 
o 

A writer aptly says: The shortest cut to the Ideal 
carriage horse is through the American trotter. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPQR T S M A N 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



THE FARM 



FEEDING FOWLS. 



The most important element of suc- 
cess in the poultry business lies in 
the man that carries the feed pail, 
as he can make or break the business 
by the way this part of the work is 
done. 

While many advocate hopper feed- 
ing and others to make all fowls 
scratch for all they get, still I con- 
sider both ways all right if properly 
done, and neither will be a success 
if improperly done. Judgment has 
to be used in both cases and different 
fowls want different treatment. My 
ideal way of feeding is to have fowls 
rather hungry scratching for feed all 
day till toward evening, when they 
should have access to a hopper con- 
taining all kinds of feed, so as to go 
to roost with their crops full of the 
necessary, and while they do not al- 
ways know what is best for them, 
still they do not make many mistakes 
in the long run. I think all fowls 
should go to roost with all they want 
to eat, as then is when the systems 
are built up and eggs manufactured, 
and the difference between half- 
grown chickens that go to roost only 
half fed and sleep in crowded quar- 
ters, unventilated, and chicks that 
have hopper feed at night and have 
have hopper feed at night and 
have comfortable quarters at night, 
proves it is very poor economy to 
try to save feed by feeding- growing 
stock any less than what they will 
eat up clean. While wet mash will 
do occasionally, I am in favor of a 
dry mash in hoppers if you have the 
hopper that works right. A mash in 
a hopper that is clogged up and they 
can't get a piece of it only when you 
knock it down to them is not a suc- 
cess. 

The more grains you have mixed 
in the ground mash the better. I 
always like to use corn meal, oats, 
wheat, bran, barley, peas, and some- 
times beans, together with meat scrap 
or, better still, meat meal, to which 
should be added some linseed meal 
at all times. The construction of the 
digestive organs of the common fowl 
is such that the mastication takes 
place after swallowing, and a crop is 
provided as receptacle for food in 
which it may be softened, thence it 
pauses to a hard, muscular, hollow 
organ, where it is thoroughly tritu- 
rated and reduced to small particles 
and rendered digestible. 

These peculiarities in the construc- 
tion require an increasing amount of 
hard substance to be taken in with 
the feed in order that the organs 
used for the mastication may be 
gradually developed so they will 
eventually completely perform their 
functions. 

I know of no better grit for this 
purpose than a heap of sharp, gritty 
sand, and it, like pure air, is cheap, 
and these two items are more im- 
portant than any others, still they are 
most often overlooked. 

While fowls are naturally scaven- 
gers, still they do better when fed 
on good sound grains and the eggs 
are of a very different texture and 
taste. The following grains are all 
good and you can select those that 
you can get to best advantage in 
your locality: 

Clean, bright wheat, cracked or 
whole, is probably as good a feed as 
we have for either growing or full 
grown fowls. Although rather more 
high priced, still it produces results 
that make it cheaper feed in the end. 

Shredded wheat can be bought in 
bags now and it makes a very fine 
feed when fed in the hoppers with 
other ground feeds, and being noth- 
ing but cooked whole wheat, I can 
not see how any feed could be more 
healthy. 

Oats is one of the best balanced 
feeds we have, however. The coarse 
fibrous hull should be removed for 
young stock, and it pays to buy oats 
of the best quality so the heart will 
be heavier in proportion to the hull. 

Rolled oats, or cracked oats, is one 
of the most important feeds we can 
feed to growing stock, as it is a 



muscle builder and makes fine 
feathers. j (j 

Corn is the most common article of 
food for fowls, in fact many people 
in years past never fed their fowls 
anything but corn from hatch to 
death, and had comparatively good 
results, but such feeding would re- 
quire free range to balance up such 
one-sided feeding. 

Corn is rich in carbo-hydrates, 
hence is largely consumed in produc- 
tion of heat and energy, for this rea- 
son it is a very desirable feed in win- 
ter time, still it should be fed in con- 
nection with other grains. 

Barley has much the same composi- 
tion as oats, but is slightly richer in 
protein, and has the advantage of 
having only one-third as much fibre. 

Oil cake or ground flax seed is also 
a very good food for growing fowls 
and laying hens, especially during 
moulting. It is one of the richest 
foods we have in bone and feather 
forming material, but it is too rich 
to be given alone and should not con- 
stitute more than 10 per cent of the 
ration for fowls. 

Peas are extremely rich in protein 
and cracked peas can be added to 
any mixture of grains to advantage. 

The value of charcoal is very often 
overlooked and it should be fed to 
fowls of all ages as a preventative 
of disease. It should be kept before 
fowls at all times, as there is no dan- 
ger of them eating too much, and it 
has a great purifying effect in ab- 
sorbing noxious gases and will cor- 
rect many digestive disorders. 

1 believe in a variety, and judgment 
should be used and change with the 
seasons, and above all see your fowls 
have a liberal supply of green feed 
of some kind and plenty of grit and 
-lean shells for laying hens. 

The mangle wurzel beet is the 
greatest winter feed I know of, as it 
can be easily raised and keeps all 
winter, and all fowls do well on them 
and they are especially beneficial to 
Reds on account of the red in their 
make-up. Their use for young stock 
is a great help in securing specimens 
string in red color. It takes red to 
make red and many fine promising 
chicks have been utterly ruined by 
not having proper feed to produce the 
fine feathers they would have had if 
given the material to make them. 
Many white feathers are caused by 
injury and lack of balanced rations 
or half rations. — Edward De Graff in 
Horseman and Stockman. 

o 

WHAT IS BABY BEEF? 



Baby beef is a prime butchers' 
beast, thoroughly fattened and ripe 
for the block at from 12 to 24 months 
of age. Growth has been artificially 
promoted by continuous heavy feed- 
ing from birth, with the object of 
obtaining in the shortest time pos- 
sible the maximum amount of well- 
matured beef. The customary ages 
at which cattle are put on the mar- 
ket are as tworyear-olds or three- 
year-olds, the greater part of the 
time being required for natural 
growth, while about four to six 
months at the end are devoted to fat- 
tening. In the production of baby 
beef the fattening process is begun 
at birth and carried on simultane- 
ously with growth. In order to make 
calves thoroughly prime and fit for 
the block as yearlings it is absolutely- 
essential that they be always fed to 
the limit of their ability of trans- 
forming food into beef. 

Baby beef i sa special article in 
which the essential characteristics 
are early maturity, quality, finish, and 
thickness of flesh. Nine out of ten 
yearlings sent to market for slaughter 
do not class as baby beef, because 
they lack finish or quality, while 
some are overfed or "overdone." This 
results from lack of a proper under- 
standing of the qualities that con- 
stitute the condition known as "ripe- 
ness" or "finish." It thus happens also 
that much disappointment in regard 
to prices often results from market- 
ing such unfinished and overdone 
cattle. 

The most important and perhaps 
the most noted progress i nthe im- 
provement of domestic live stock has 
been the continuous advance toward 
early maturity, earlier maturity hav- 
ing been one of the chief objects 
kept in view by all great improvers 
of live stock. 



Selection and breeding have been 
the principal means through which 
the time required for the natural ma- 
nning of domestic cattle has been 
reduced several years. It is also rec- 
ognized that heavy feeding exerts a 
marked influence in producing early 
maturity, this being an artificial 
method through which animals are 
matured for the block in less than 
the normal time. 

Numerous reasons have been given 
as causes of the growing popularity 
of early fattened baby beef with both 
consumer and producer. Doubtless it 
may be said to be based on economic 
principles. 

The first step toward baby beef 
was the demand for and production 
of smaller and more compact animals, 
already referred to as pony beef. The 
butchers claimed that this change 
was a good one for economical rea- 
sons, because small, compact car- 
casses cut up with less waste fat 
and furnish the thick, light steaks 
which are most in demand by the 
consumer because of their greater 
cheapness. As the demand regulates 
the price, it was natural that the 
producer should furnish the smaller 
and more compact carcass for which 
there was a steady demand and for 
which he would receive a good price. 

Again, experimental evidence shows 
that young animals will feed more 
economically than those more mature 
in age, so that baby beef will give 
from 25 to 50 per cent more meat 
for the grain consumed than the 
same animal would if kept until two 
or three years of age. This was the 
economical solution of the problem 
of cheapening the production of meat. 
Therefore, the greater profit in small 
joints, together with the greater eco- 
nomy of producing young beef, may 
be regarded as the most potent fac- 
tors in bringing about baby beef. 

Maturity for the block in beef cat- 
tle means that condition when they 
have Reached full growth of body 
and are thoroughly fat or ripe for 
slaughter. The average age at which 
cattle are now fully grown and fat- 
tened for the market is between two 
and three years. Early maturity, 
therefore, means that the animal has 
been fully grown and fattened in less 
than the average length of time re- 
quired by that class of stock. 

In addition to the factors already 
mentioned through which early ma- 
turity can be produced — namely, se- 
lection, breeding and feeding — there 
is a great difference between indi- 
vidual animals in their tendency to 
mature early. Small-framed, compact 
animals that possess quality, indi- 
cated by fine bone, a soft, mellow 
hide, and silky hair, generally mature 
in less time than is required by 
the average of the breed. Feeding 
is the strongest means by which ad- 
vantage can be taken of this tendency 
in an animal to hasten its maturity. 
Another way of producing stock that 
will mature early is by breeding very 
young animals, but this is not rec- 
ommended, because it is a dwarfing 
process and therefore associated with 
more or less chance as to the result. 

When early maturity i sattempted 
by means of liberal feeding with nu- 
tritious feed, carbonaceous in char- 
acter and lacking in bulk, the ten- 
dency to produce flesh and fat is 
readily developed; but when very 
heavy feeding is resorted to there is 
always the danger of overfeeding, 
which often results in permanent in- 
jury to the animal. 
• From the butcher's point of view 
there is no difference between pure- 
bred, grade, cross-bred, or common 
stock, provided they all possess the 
same beef qualifications. From the 
breeder's and the feeder's points of 
view the choice is decidedly with 
pure bred animals, as they are most 
likely to breed and develop true to 
type and to present a uniform ap- 
pearance. At present the feeder re- 
lies principally on grade stock, and 
when such animals possess a high 
concentration of the blood of any one 
breed they are generally equal to 
pedigreed animals for feeding pur- 
poses. Cross breeding is not very 
common in this country. In England, 
where it is more generally practiced 
for the production of special beef 
qualifications, excellent results have 
been obtained; but unless the breeds 
are well selected bad results are 



liable to follow, especially after the 
first cross. Stress is often laid on 
the importance of uniformity in color, 
although the packers claim that it 
does not increase the value except 
as it might catch the eye of the 
buyer— Extract from Bulletin No. 105, 
Tnited States Department of Agri- 
culture. 

o 

FOOD FOR HENS. 



The most costly portion of the egg 
is the white, or albumen. This is 
derived from the nitrogenous matter 
of grains, but principally from the 
animal foods. Hence meat, milk, in- 
sects and grains, rich in gluten, are 
the best foods for that purpose. One 
of the cheapest articles that can be 
used is blood. If it can be secured 
from the slaughter house, mixed with 
the ground grain and cooked, it will 
be highly relished by the hens, and 
will largely assist in egg production. 
When meat is used the lean portion 
should be preferred, as the fat is of 
but little service if corn is used in 
the food. One of the cheapest sub- 
stances for adults is milk, whether 
sweet or sour. Regarding the use of 
blood it is well adapted for egg-pro- 
duction. It can be given with ad- 
vantage to chicks as well as fowls, 
and be used in several different 
ways. First, by mixing one pound of 
blood with three pounds of mixed 
ground grain, and the whole mixture 
cooked as bread. There is nothing 
superior to it in such form, not even 
meat. Second, if the mixture of 
blood is put in a bag ami boiled it 
makes a food that not only takes the 
place of meat, but it is better for 
the purpose. As the blood at some 
slaughter houses is usually wasted 
there should be no difficulty in pro- 
curing it. It will keep any length of 
time in winter, but if not cold 
weather, should any portion remain 
after feeding, it may be added to 
the compost heap, where it will be 
valuable as one of the best nitro- 
genous fertilizers that can be used. 
o 

POULTRY NOTES. 



One reason why poultry manure is 
rich, concentrated, and active is be- 
cause fowls feed principally on seeds 
and insects all of which are rich in 
fertilizing matter. 

In selecting a site for the poultry- 
house the one thing to be avoided is 
dampness. Damp houses and swampy 
yards are responsible for a goodly 
share of the ills that afflict poultry. 
South hill sides are capital places for 
poultry-houses, as usually good sun- 
light and good drainage can be readily 
provided. 

No amount of persuasion or tempt- 
ingly high prices should induce the 
breeder to part with his best birds, 
for if he desires to steadily improve 
his flock no matter whether it is of 
so-called common birds or pure-bieds 
he must take his pick first of the 
very cream of the flock. 

Statistics show that ninety-nine 
farmers out of a hundred keep hens. 
It is estimated that seventy-live per 
cent of this number raise mongrels 
and cross-breeds. Now that the cam- 
paign for pure-bred cattle, hogs and 
even field seeds is on, it would seem 
wise to reduce the number of mongrel 
poultry. 

Cornmeal fed to poultry will be 
much improved if mixed with boiling 
water, which partially cooks it A 
mistake is often made in feeding it, 
if given too wet and soft, in which 
state it is often injurious, compelling 
the fowls to take more water than 
their nature requires. 

Poultry generally suffer from pre- 
ventible ills. Naturally they are sub- 
ject to very few diseases. If kept 
clean, not overfed, not cooped up 
close, fed pure food, supplied with 
clean water regularly, and have an 
abundance of pure air in their roost- 
ing places they will live and thrive 
without any trouble except in rare 
cases. — N. J. Shepherd. 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE HAND CREAM SEPARATROR. 



Authority on the subject of farm 
dairying will agree that any farmer 
who milks five cows or more and is 
either selling the cream or making 
butter of it, needs a centrifugal hand 
cream separator to secure the best 
profits. 

The hand cream separator, working 
under favorable conditions, does not 
leave over 1-20 of a pound of butter 
fat in 100 pounds of skimniilk. The 
gravity systems and dilution separator 
methods of securing the butter fat will 
leave, under favorable conditions, 
from one-third to three-quarters of a 
pound of butter fat in 100 pounds of 
milk. 

According to these figures, a farmer 
who uses a hand separator and milks 
10 cows, would lose in the skim milk 
but 30 pounds of buter fat a year 
on the total amount of milk. By the 
other methods he would lose from 200 
to 450 pounds a year. Figuring butter 
fat at 20 cents a pound, there would 
be an annual loss of from$34 to $84 
between the hand separator and the 
other methods. 

Not only does the machine secure 
practically all the butter fat, but it 
delivers the skim milk in a sweet, 
warm, and undiluted condition ready 
to be fed to the calves. Very few 
dairy utensils are needed, as the milk 
is separated as soon as it comes from 
the cow and the skim milk is fed at 
once. Less work is required to handle 
the milk in this manner than with the 
other methods. 

The cream delivered from the sepa- 
rator is of uniform richness; it has 
had all the fibrous and foreign matter 
removed. The milk has not absorbed 
bad flavors and odors from standing 
around and the cream is in excellent 
condition for ripening. Thus there is 
a gain in the quantity and quality of 
butter obtained. 

Not only is the centrifugal separator 
of advantage in the production of 
fine butter, but it is equally advan- 
tageous in the purification of milk 
and cream for direct human consump- 
tion. Dairies improve the quality of 
their milk very much by running it 
through the separator and then mix 
the milk and cream before bottling it. 

The average farmer cannot afford 
to haul the whole milk to the creamery 
even if he is within hauling distance 
and the roads are good. The skim 
milk often comes back in a cold, half- 
sour and contaminated condition, 
which is unfit for feeding purposes. 
Even if it does come back in good 
condition, it is impossible to feed it 
regularly, and it is far from being 
equal to hand separator milk. Too 
much time is required to haul it to 
the creamery compared to the length 
of time required to separate it at 
home by hand. The hand separator 
cream, by careful handling, need not 
be hauled to the creamery oftener 
than every other day during the sum- 
mer and perhaps not oftener than 
once in three days during the winter 
months. 

Hand separators may be procured in 
sizes varying in capacity from 150 
pounds of milk (18 ga'lons) an hour 
to 1,200 pounds (144 galions) an hour. 
The prices varying from about $40, 
for the smaller size, to about $175 
for the larger size, depending upon 
the particular make. 

A farmer who milks 10 cows, ob- 
taining from them, say, 300 pounds of 
milk a day, or 150 pounds at each 
milking, should be able to separate it 
in fifteen minutes. This will require 
a separator of 600 pounds capacity 
an hour, which would cost about $100 
The average separator of standard or 
reliable make should last, with good 
care, for 12 or 15 years, with very 
few repairs. — Rural World. 

o 

Legitimately the fowl has four well- 
defined uses, as an egg-producer, for 
its flesh, for its feathers, and in ex- 
terminating pests, and to these might 
be added, saving waste. 



No fowl over two years old should 
be kept in the poultry yard except 
for some special reason. An extra 
good mother or a finely feathered 
bird that is desirable as a breeder 
may be kept longer. But ordinary 
hens and cocks should be fattened 
for market at the end of the second 
year. 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's ^ 

Caustic Balsam 



IT HAS N 



For; 

lieuling. 

the \ 



It is ■ 



J for all Old 
«, Hruisoj o, 
Woumls, Felons 
fcjterior Cancers, Boils 

Human c B „ r n n !o°r 

CAUSTIC BALSAM has 

Body r fflSSLS 



We would say to all 
who buy it thai il does 
lot contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result fram its ex- 
ternal use. Persistent, 
thorounh use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case thai 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



O EQUAL 

A 

Perfectly Sale 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all Stiff Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

Cornhill. Tel.— "One bottle Caustic Balsam did 

my rheumatism more good than 1120 00 paid In 
doctor s bills." OTT'l A BKVKR. 

Price 3 1 .80 pel bottle. Sold by d ■ -aggiltl, or sent 
by us express prepaid Write for Booklet R. 

The LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, 0. 



Fairmont Hotel 

Management of 

Palace Hotel Co. 



A Guarantee of Excellence 



The only large hotel commanding 
a view of our incomparable bay. 
The best located hotel in the 
world, as it is the most convenient 
to the business centers, while its 
elevation affords wholesome ad- 
vantages in the way of pure air, 
sunshine and the absence of all 
annoyances connected with the 
rebuilding of a great city. 

■:• EUROPEAN PLAN ■:■ 

Rates, single: $2.50, $3, $4, $5, 

$6, $7, $8. 
Suites: $10, $12, $14, $16, $18, $20 
. EVERY ROOM WITH BATH. 

Music a feature at Dinner and 
in the Foyer, evenings. 
Address 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



FAST PACER FOR SALE. 

Seymow M. 2:23 by Diawood, dam 
Nancy H. by Upstart. Brown horse, 
six years old, absolutely sound and 
good mannered. Stands 15% hands 
high, weighs close to 1100 pounds. Was 
timed separately a mile at Pleasanton 
in the 2:20 pace in 2:12, heat won by 
Inferlotta in 2:07Vi. He has been a 
half mile in 1:03% to Miller cart and 
quarters in 30 seconds. For price and 
further particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davisville, Cal. 

TWO PACING STALLION COLTS 
WANTED. 



A yearling or two-year-old by Star 
Pointer and one by Zombro. Must be 
gootl color, natural pacers, standard 
bred and registered, or eligible to regis- 
tration. Bay or brown, little or no 
white, of good size, neat heads, not too 
high on leg, standing and traveling 
square on their feet. Must have 
plenty of knee and hock action. Must 
be absolutely sound and out of good 
mares. Address giving price, pedigree 
and full particulars as to speed, if 
worked, etc., F. W. KELLEY, Breeder 
and Sportsman, 616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco. 



WANTED 
TROTTING BRED STALLION. 

A trotting bred Stallion, standard- 
bred preferred. Send breeding, descrip- 
tion and all particulars, also very 
lowest cash price to 

P. O. BOX 1011, 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



Combination horse, five years old. 
Shows all gaits under saddle, single- 
foots three-minute gait, trots square to 
buggy, very showy, trick horse. Lady 
can drive or ride. Swellest riding horse 
on the Coast. Sound, and can be 
taught anything. Suite 11 to 14, 2011 
Mariposa St., Fresno, Cal. 

JACK FOR SALE. 



Weighs 1.000 pounds, is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 

S. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa Cal. 




SPAVIN CURE 




From a One-Time Owner of the 
GREAT ANGUS POINTER 

Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 2, 1907. 

My horse, Gold Hal 2:12%, in his 
second race was in a bad mix-up. Two 
pacers were down and he jumped into 
the pile, injuring both his fetlocks. 
Both shin and knee boots were torn off, 
also his support and both tires. A 
broken brace punctured one of the fet- 
locks, and he went dead lame. We re- 
sorted to your remedy and he stepped 
a couple of miles to-day better than 
2:10 in his work. I consider that it 
has done wonders in this case. 

The duty counts so that I will, if pos- 
sible, take some home with me. My 
home address is Carleton Place, On- 
tario, Canada. I am the party who 
bought Angus Pointer 2:01% when he 
was a yearling, developed him, getting 
him a record of 2:06 before selling him 
to F. G. Jones of Memphis, Tenn. 
Would like you to write me, quoting 
trade price. Address care of H. W. 
Wilson. Secretary K. T. H. B. A., Lex- 
ington, Ky. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. MACPHERSON. 



Is a Steed Bred to the Purple More 
Valuable Than a Mongrel? 

Are Not Diamonds More Valuable 
Than Paste? 

Then this vital fact stands out as 
clear as crystal, "Save-the-Horse" is 
worth its weight in gold. No other 
agency, remedy or method can ac- 
complish such miraculous and unfail- 
ing results. It saves time and money. 

MAKES A TENDON LIKE A ROD 

OF STEEL. 

"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
Bone and Bog Spavin, Ringbone (ex- 
cept low Ringbone), Curb, Thorouglipin. 
Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind Puff, Injured 
Tendons and all lameness, without scar 
or loss of hair. Horse may work as 
usual. 

$5.00 Per Bottle, with a written guar- 
antee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make it. Send for 
a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



W. HIGG IN BOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office With E. Stewart & Co., 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 

HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs. 

Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Nlles 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California Stat* 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co., San 
Mateo. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers In PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Blake, Moffltt & Towne. Los Angelea 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland. Oregon. 

DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 12, 1907. 
The H. D. Cowles Co., otherwise known 
as the Cowles-Payne Co., a partnership, 
is this day dissolved. I will not be re- 
sponsible for any debts contracted from 
this date on account of the above named 
partnership. 

C. S. PAYNE. 



FOR SALE. 



A perfectly matched driving team, 
mare and gelding, six and seven years, 
dark bays, city broke, and excellent driv- 
ers. Full brother and sister, sired by 
Silas Skinner, dam a well bred mare. 
Handsome and good travelers. For fur- 
ther particulars and price, address 
D. J. P., 
Breeder & Sportsman Office. 



Racing ! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Race Track 

OPENING DAY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 

Races Commence at 1:40 P. M., Sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 
20 minutes until 1:40 P. M. No 
smoking in the last two cars, which 
are reserved for ladies and their 
escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 

A number of good mares, geldings, 
colts and fillies by such sires as McKin- 
ney, Searchlight, Lecco, James Madison, 
Daedalion, Morengo King and Bonnie 
McKinney. Good individuals, all kind 
and gentle. For further information 
and to see the horses apply to 
H. BUSING, 
Race Track, Alameda, Cal. 

IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLION! 

At one-half other people's prices. If 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER, West Orange. N. J 



AN INFLAMED TENDON 

NKEDS COOLING. 



AJJSORBINE 



Will do it and restore the circulation, 
assist nature to repair strained, rup- 
tured ligaments more successfully than 
Firing. No blister, no hair gone, and 
you can use the horse. $2.00 per bottle, 
delivered. Book 2-0 Fr<e. 

ABSORBINE, JR., for mankind, fl.OO 
bottle. Cures Strained Torn Ligaments, 
Varicose Veins, Varicocele, Hydrocele, en- 
larged Glands and Fleers. Allays pain quickly 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

54 Monmouth St. Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore. ; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal. ; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



STAM B. FILLY FOR SALE. 

A coming three-year-old, entered and 
paid up on in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
and Stanford Stakes, sired by Stam B. 
2:11 '4. dam Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%; 
second dam Flora H., dam of Thomp- 
son 2:14 1 /4, and Bonetti (trial 2:14%); 
third and fourth dams by producing 
sires. Is now in Henry llelman's string 
at I'leasanton, where she can be seen. 
Trotted a mile in 2:50 as a two-year-old. 
An excellent prospect. For further par- 
ticulars address henry hahn, aias 

Buena Vista Ave., Alameda. 

TWO TROTTERS FOR SALE. 




Sorrel Gelding, Ave years, by L. W. 
Russell, dam Diva, dam of Helen Keyes, 
by Piedmont 2 : 1 7 V4 - This horse is good 
size, sound, a first-class business horse 
and is considered a good speed prospect. 

Black Filly, four years old, by Die- 
tatus Medium, dam by Hay Rum 2:16%. 
Sound, and a safe and pleasant driver. 
Will be fast if trained. Price for either 
«r the above horses $200. R. CONSANI, 
N. E. Cor. Grove and La gun a Sts., San 
Francisco. 



<0 G0PAIB4 



CO ' 



i 



CAPSULES 



h 

Z 

0) 



*S IN 2*^ 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



WM. P. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

TETEWKAIT 6TTBOEOH 
1155 Golden Gate At*, 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 
SAN FKANCISCO, C1L. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 

— In — 

HALFTONES AND LINE EN GRAVING 
Artistic Daslrninr. 



141 VHtncla St. 



San Traaclseo 



BUBBEBOID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BOHESTELL, RICHARDSON It CO., 
473-486 Sixth St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

PKTKK 8AXE A SUN. 513 S2d street, 
Oakland. Cal.. Importers. Breederi and 
Dealers for past thirty years. AM varie- 
ties Cattle. Horses. Hlieep. Hogs. HIkIi- 
olaaa breeding stock. Correapondanc* 
Melted 

COLLIE AND BLOODHOUND PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. 



Best bred Young Stock on the Coast. 
Sires and Dams winners on the Bench 
and Workers in the Field. Address 
T. S. GRIFFITH, 
Glen Tana Collie Kennels. 
Spokane, Wash. 

FOR SALE— SETTER PUPS. 

Pedigreed English Setter Pups, two 
months old. Address 

M FERRY, 
454 West Santa Clara St., San Jose. 



At the g| 
tyf Tongues Emnp 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

CDMPRE55ED PURE 5ALT BRICKS. 
AND PATENT FEEDER5. 

No wa5te.no necjlectdll convenience 

Yourdtdlerhdsit. Write us for the booh 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

BrooKlyn. N.V. 



STALLION CARDS 



Folders, Posters and Pamphlets 
Compiled and Printed. 

PEDIGREES 

TABULATED 

Giving Performances of the get of 
sires and dams. Typewritten, 
ready to frame. 

STALLION SERVICE 

BOOKS, $1.00 

With index and blank notes for ser- 
vice fee. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THREE HIGH CLASS HORSES FOR 
SALE TO CLOSE AN ESTATE. 



No. 1. Seal brown gelding, five years 
old, stands 16 hands, weighs 1,150 
pounds. Sired by Direct 2:05%. dam 
by Guy Wilkes 2:12%; second dam by 
Chas. Derby 2:20. This horse has never 
been trained, but is a fine driving horse 
and can trot a 2:40 gait. He is in every 
respect a very handsome and desirable 
animal, in first-class condition, very 
kind and gentle. 

No. 2. Bay filly coming three years 
old, stands 15.1 hands, is a trotter. Sired 
by Greco B. 2:12%, dam by Poscora 
Hayward; second dam by Williamson's 
Belmont. She is a remarkably fine filly, 
gentle and kind, has been broken but 
four weeks, and think she can show a 
three-minute gait. 

No. 3. Bay gelding, coming three 
years old, natural pacer. Sired by Wil- 
liam Harold 2:13%; first dam by Luster 
2:22; second dam by Richard's Elector 
2170; third dam by Chieftain 721; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont; fifth 
dam by imported Langford. Has been 
broken but two months, and shows 
great natural speed. Stands 15.3 hands, 
weighs 1.075 pounds. Is developed like 
a four or five-year-old. Very handsome 
and in first-class condition. A real 
show horse, with the kindest disposi- 
tion and every promise to become a 
great race horse. 

None of these horses wear boots or 
straps. They are not afraid of any- 
thing on the road, and I will guarantee 
each one to be sound and without 
blemish. For particulars address or 
apply to 

H. OLSEN. 
814 B St., Haywards, Cal. 



Do You Want the Best? 



Breed Your Mares to 



Zombro 2:11 



Son of McKinney 2:11% and Whisper by Almont Lightning. 
Service Fee — $50. 

Zombro holds the Coast record (2: 13) for three-year-old trotting stallions. 
His daughter, Bellemont 2:09>4, holds Coast trotting record for three-year-old 
fillies. His son, Hymettus 2:08% holds world's race record for three-year-old 
geldings. Zombro has four in the 2:10 list, ten in the 2:15 list and seven- 
teen in the 2:20 list. He has won more first prizes in the show ring than any 
other stallion In California, among them the gold medal at the great Port- 
land Fair — over eighteen competitors. His colts always sell for big prices. 
Address 

GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3949 South Figueroa Street, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



Talking About Guns 



We might fill this page with the Merits and 
Achievements of PARKER GUNS, and then aot 
half tell the story. "Write for our illustrated Cata- 
logue and get the story Complete. It will interest 
you. 



The oldest builders of shot guns in America. 

PARKER BROS., 



N Y. SALESROOMS, 
32 Warren Street 



M ERI DEN, CONN. 



$10 Due Saturday, February 1st, 1908 

and must be made not later than that date 

On Three- Year-Olds 



IN THE 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 5, $7,000 

For Foals born 1905 — Race to take place 1908 
Three- Year-Old Division Stake Divided 



$3,000 For Three-Year-Old Trotters 
200 For Nominator of .Dam of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire, of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot 
when mare was bred. 



$1,000 For Three-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 For Nominator of Dam of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace 
when mare was bred. 



Last Payment Before Starting Payment. Be Sure to Make It. 

Address all communications and remit by check, postal order, 
WYlls-Fargo Express, or registered letter to 



E. P. HEALD. 

President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary. 
P. 0. Drawer 447, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Office 366 Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 
Best located and healthiest stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster 
on hand for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park 
roadsters and prepare horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stabl* 
and not have their horses frightened by autos or cars 




TALLION OWNER 

If In need of anything In the linn of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse looks, 
stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock ami made from photos, 
Hoof Pads of all kinds for road or track, Brooding Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports. Pregnators and all Specialties lor Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : i 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



1 



Agents and Correspondents Wanted Every- 
where for The Breeder and Sportsman 




Our 1907 New Model Three Bolted Glin embodies all of the requisite 
qualities of a perfect gun — safety, strength, durability, superior shoot- 
ing qualities, beautiful lines, nice balance, and in oiir hiifh grade guns 
very fine finish and richness of ornamentation. See rut Mo. 7 $300 list 
gun shown above — speeial price $213.75, ejector $10 extra We guarantee 
the three bolts to hold the gun tight for all time and not allow the gun 
to fly open in discharging. We guarantee the coil main springs forever 
against breaks and miss-fires. 

Send for 1907 Art Catalog describing improvements and special prices 
on eighteen grades $17.75 net to $300 list. 



ITHACA GUN CO., Dept. 15 ITHACA, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Branch: Phil B. Bekeart Co., 717 Market St., S-n Francisco 



3k 



Saturday, January 11, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



The Highest Average 

FOR THE YEAR OF 1907 
was made by Mr. Fred Gilbert who, of course, used 

DUPONT SMOKELESS 

THE OFFICIAL RECORDS show that during 1907 Mr. Gilbert shot 
at 9,195 targets and broke 8,817 

A Grand Average of 95.89 Per Cent 

ELEVEN of the 16 men who made AN AVERAGE OF 93 
PER CENT or better used 

Dupont Brands 

OF SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

The Highest Amateur Average 

(94.5 PER CENT) 
was made by an Illinois amateur, who also used 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE LONGEST RUN OF THE YEAR 

271 STRAIGHT 

made by J. M. Hawkins with 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE POWDER THAT MAKES AND BREAKS RECORDS 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. . 



Indiana and Ohio 



Paid up Capital $100,000.00 



LIVESTOCK INSURANCE CO. 

Insures HORSES, MULES and CATTLE Against Death From Any Cause 

$100 000 00 A PP rove <i Bonds Deposited With the Auditor of State 
~ ' * Of Indiana for the Protection of all Policy Holders. 

(J. E. VAN CAM P, State Agent.) 

For Application Blanks and Information Address 

ARTHUR WOLF & CO., Resident Managers, 
521 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 
SMITH DOURSON & CO., City Agents. 



General Watts 2:09 , / 4, World's Champion three-year-old 
stallion by 



'AXWORTHY" (3) 2:15y 2 



And winner of American Horse Breeder Futurity. It pays to 
book to such a sire. 



n writing kin<ny The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

tion this journal r J ' ' 



When 

mention tms j 



Quinns Oinrment 

Will Mmke> A Horse Over} 



will put sound legs under him and 
will save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpufffl and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use It. 

Mr. IT. H. Clark. Frcdnnin. N. T.. write*: "The tiottla of 
Quinn's ointment jhii chawd from yon about two yean MO 
lemoved a curb and thormiiihpln and did It tor Ifood. My 
honte'a leg 1b as smooth as ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggist! or sent by mall' 
Write for circulars, testimonies, etc. 

W.B. BODY A COMPANY, WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



Send Entries at Once 

TO OUR 

Combination Sale 

TO BE HELD 

FEBRUARY 10TH, 1908. 
We will receive Entries for this 
Sale up to January 10th, and limit 
the number to Fifty Horses. 
FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



The Coney Island Jockey Club 

Race Course: Sheepshead Bay, New York 
Office: Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., 
New York 



To Close Wednesday, January 15th, 1908. 

The Coney Island 
Jockey Club Stakes $25,000 

For the June Meeting, 1908 



For Three Years Old. — By subscription of $25 each, 
to accompany the nomination; $250 additional to start. 
Guaranteed Cash Value $25,000, of which $3,000 to the sec- 
ond, and $2,000 to the third. Should the winner of this 
stake also win the Tidal and The Lawrence Realization 
Stakes, The Coney Island Jockey Club will give an addi- 
tional $10,000 to such horse winning the three events. 
Weights : (Jolts 126 lbs., Geldings 123 lbs., Fillies 121 lbs. ; 
winners of three races exclusively for three years old of 
the value of $5,000 each, or of one of the value of $15,000, 
to carry 3 lbs. extra. Non-winners of a race exclusively for 
three years old of the value of $5,000 allowed 7 lbs.; of 
$3,000* allowed 10 lbs. ONE MILE AND A HALF. 



Entries to be addressed to the Clerk of the Course, 
THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB, 

Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., New York. 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS. 



75 PER CENT 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

CampbelPs Horse Foot Remedy 



SOLD BY 




W. A. Sayre Sacramento, Cal. 

R. T. Frasier Pueblo. Colo 

J. G. Read & bro Ogden. Utah 

Jublnvllle & Nance Butte. Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle. Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal 

Wm. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

W. C. Topping San Diego, Cal 

Main-Winchester- Jepsen Co 

Los Angeles. Cal. 

H. Thornwaldson Fresno. Ca.l 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTlgue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal 



Guaranteed under the Pood and Drug- 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1319. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL £. CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 11, 1908. 



The Best Horse Boots 




SHOT 



A feeling of Confidence comes to the Sportsman who slips 
U. M. C. Shells into his gun. A feeling of satisfaction follows 
as he flips out the empties and picks up his game. U. M. C. 
Smokeless Powder Shot Shells and your own good gun will insure 
good sport, for there is much game this year. 
Tell your dealer "U. M. C. only." 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Agency: 313 Broadway, New York City. 




TOM DILLON 



-Agent for — 



John B. Stetson's Hats 



Orders filled by mall. 

Van Ness Ave. & McAllister St., 
San Francisco. 



John Barduhn, formerly of the Thurlow 

Block 

John Kavanagh, formerly of the Palace 
Hotel 

Kavanagh & Barduhn 

Merchant Tailors 

1124 Golden Gate Avenue, 
Between Buchanan and Webster Sti., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



A RECORD THAT IS A RECORD 

Adolph Topperwein makes Straight runs of 14,540, 13,599, 13,292 and 13,219 on 2V4-inch 
wooden blocks at 20 foot rise, and misses only 4 out of 50,000 and 9 out of 72,500, shooting 

WINCHESTER 

SMOKELESS POWDER CARTRIDGES AND .22 CALIBER RIFLES 

Just to show that all things ARE POSSIBLE with Winchester .22 Caliber Cartridges and 
Rifles, and also to prove "Who's Who" in making rifle records IN PUBLIC, Mr. Topper- 
wein recently shot for ten consecutive days at San Antonio, Texas, and made the above 
world's records for wing shooting with a rifle. He used only two rifles and loaded them 
himself. These record-breaking, history-making scores were made, without the aid of a 
notary public, before large crowds of people in a public park — not in a far-away back lot 
or down on the farm behind the barn. 




RED 



W 



RECORDS 



ARE 



ALWAYS 



RELIABLE 



GOLCHER BROS., 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 

FISHING TACKLE 
AMMUNITION 
SPORTING GOODS 




£ 
▼ 



4 Telephone 

4 Temporary 1883 



511 Market St., San Francisco 



WRITE BREEZE. HE'S THE DOCTOR. 

TELL HIM YOUR CARBURETER TROUBLES. 

If your Gas Engine, whether it is in an automobile or boat, does not run to 
suit you GET A TEXT BOOK SENT FREE. 

Agents: 

New York — Breeze Carbureter Co., 101 W. 66th St. Philadelphia — Rittenhouse 
Garage, 214 So. 23d St. Toronto, Ontario, Can. — E. R. McKlnlay, 16 
Seaforth Ave. Chicago — Thos. H. McNevin, 70 La Salle St. 
Boston — V. J. Jacobs, 46 Columbus Ave. 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYW H ER E— BIG THING. 

Our Terms are Right. Our Goods are Right. There's Money In It 

BREEZE CARBURETER CO., 

280 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



DID YOU EVER HEAR OF AN 
OFFER LIKE THIS? 

Useful and Beautiful 

No other firm could offer this 
but us. 

This is the first time we have 
ever made this offer — this beauti- 
ful four-piece set of Silverware 
(guaranteed), full size for family 
use, packed in case. 

For Only 97c 



It is done solely to advertise our product and only one 
set will be sent to each family, with positively no duplicate or- 
ders. The plate is heavy and the pattern one of the latest and 
most fashionable — the famous "Rose." The pieces are 
FIT TO GRACE ANY TABLE AND WILL LAST FOR YEARS 

ORHFR TO DAY This price includes all packing, shipping and de- 
UI\1/LI\ 1 KJ-Ul\ I livery charges prepaid to your door. Send cash, 
money order, or 2c stamps to Dept. E., 




Rogers Silverware Co., 



No. 114 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 



SURPLUS $3,200,000 



The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the Are of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in Are and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 

»♦♦» » ♦♦♦♦♦ » ♦»»♦♦♦» ♦ »♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦ 

! The ROSS McMAHON 

% 



Awning and Tent Co. 



t ♦ *!* ♦ *?« 4Ji *J* *J* •!* *5» *2* "J* '5*- 

* 

* 
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+ 
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* 



* Tents, Hammocks, Awnings and Covers. Camping Outfits for Hunting ]jj 
% and Fishing Trips. 



* 

| 73 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. I 

X Phone Temporary 2030. 




McMurray - McMurray 

McMURRAY 

Sulkies 
Jogging 



URRAYl 

ries and 



Carts 



1*7 

5' 



Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 
prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 
531 Valencia St.,' San Pranclsco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 



McMurray - McMurray 



Four more In 2:15 have already been credited this season to 



"McKINNEY" 2:11V 4 



Making his wonderful list still more remarkable. 



„\r;;:r;!:" K jo,;r;^ The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



GOLCHER BROS., 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 

FISHING TACKLE 
AMMUNITION 
SPORTING GOODS 




■ 

4 
* 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

I rtSSSf 1883 511 Market St., San Francisco | 

««<J 444444 444444444444 44444 44444 44 44 : 444444 4444444 44444 

The Stallion Number 



OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

Will be issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

If You Own a Stallion 



Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number will reach every man on the 
Coast who owns a good mare. 

If You Own a Mare 

You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
tain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 

If so, you will he interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will be valuable and 
entertaining. 



Tn place of getting out the usual large Christinas 
number of the BREEDER and SPORTSMAN last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February loth was selected 
as Christmas comes too early for an issue of this descrip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wish illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. Write 
for price and particulars. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
SAN FKANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, January 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



a 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 
OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 Pacific Building, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months Jl 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, bu> 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A couple of enterprising Californians who like 
the harness horse breeding business got together 
a few weeks ago and as one had a nice farm and 
the other some ready cash, they concluded, after 
talking the matter over, that Searchlight 2:03% 
would be an excellent investment in the stallion line, 
if he could be purchased and brought back to Cali- 
fornia, where last season the three-year-old Aerolite 
and the two-year-old Ray o'Light, both sired by him, 
were the sensations of the year, the former pacing 
a public trial in 2:05% and the latter taking the 
two-year-old pacing race record of 2:13%. 

A letter was written to the manager of Searchlight 
and a reply was received stating the price at which 
the great son of Darknight would be allowed to 
change ownership. The price was a stiff one, but 
did not stop the Californians, and they immediately 
wrote the owner that the money would be- deposited 
and paid over on a clear bill of sale being made for 
the horse. They waited a reasonable length of time, 
but no reply of acceptance came, so the telegraph 
wires were used and still no answer was returned. 

The California gentlemen were disappointed, of 
course, but concluded that there was no use worrying 
over it, so they dropped the matter. At the price 
they expected to pay it would have taken two or 
three years of good business to break even on the 
trade, with the chances of the horse dying and many 
other contingencies that are possible in the horse 
business. They have their money and it will not 
spoil if proper care is taken of it, and there are 
other sires for sale if they should conclude they 
could not get along without one. 

o 

We are pleased to record the fact that Mr. Frank 
J. Kilpatrick of this city has purchased from Sam 
Norris of Santa Rosa the splendid stallion Washing- 
ton McKinney, formerly owned by Rose Dale Stock 
Farm. Dick Abies, who has quite a string of horses 
owned by Mr. Kilpatrick in training at Pleasanton, 
has already shipped Washington McKinney there. 
This horse is an own brother to that very fast trot- 
ter Geo. W. McKinney 2:14%, that P. W. Hodges, 
who trained him, says could have beaten 2:10, and 
that Washington McKinney was fully as fast as his 
brother when a colt. Mr. Kilpatrick purchased 
several youngsters by Washington McKinney during 
the past two years, and is so enamored of them 
that he determined to own the sire. Nearly every 
one of these youngsters is a fast trotter, some of 
them having already shown close ' to two-minute 
speed, and as they have much style and finish, as 
well as fine trotting action, the conclusion is irresist- 
ible that Washington McKinney will be a first-class 
sire if given any% chances at all in the stud, which 
he will certainly have if Mr. Kilpatrick owns him. 

There is no handsomer horse in California than 
this stallion, and he will be a very popular horse 
with breeders. 

o 

Thos. Ronan, proprietor of the Pleasanton track, 
has decided to place his young stallion Birdman in 
the stud this year to a few outside mares at $50 
to insure. Birdman is one of the best bred horses 
on the Coast, and has size, style and great natural 
speed. His sire is Antrim, the sire of that great, 
mare Anzella 2:06%, that was the largest money 
winner of her year on the Grand Circuit when Mil- 
lard Sanders campaigned her for the Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm. Antrim was sired by Aberdeen, who 
sired Kentucky Union 2:07% and the dams of On- 
ward Silver 2:05%, Patchen Maid 2:08%, Aldeen 
2:09% and other fast ones. Aberdeen was a son of 
Hambletonian 10. The dam of Birdman is the reg- 
istered mare Birdie by the great Jay Bird, one of 
Geo. Wilkes' greatest sons. Jay Bird sired five in 
2:10 and the dams of three in 2:10. The second dam 
of Birdman was a daughter of Geo. \Vilkes, and the 
third dam a producing daughter of Daniel Lambert, 
a son of Ethan Allen, one of the handsomest 
stallions of the great Morgan family. 

A careful perusal of the pedigree of Birdman will 
show that he is closely related to many champions 
of the race track and show ring. His colts are fine 
lookers and can all step fast as soon as they are 
broke to harness. Mr. Ronan has a few of them at 
Pleasanton and will be pleased to show them at any 
time. 



The first advertisement of a California stallion 
for the season of 1908, which has appeared in the 
columns of the Breeder and Sportsman, is that of 
Zombro 2:11. the greatest of the sons of McKinney 
thus far as a sire. Much has been written about 
Zombro in the columns of this journal since he first 
appeared as a three-year-old trotter and beat all 
the best ones of his year in actual contests, winning 
forty heats that year in standard time, a feat never 
before or since equaled by a three-year-old. and 
closing the season with a record of 2:13, still the 
Coast three-year-old stallion record. In writing of 
Zontbro nowadays, about the only thing necessary is 
to refer to his record as a sire, as the Year Books 
furnish all the facts and figures necessary. 

One of the most remarkable facts in connection 
with his history as a sire is that only two of his 
sixteen 2:20 performers are out of record mares. 
Of his four 2:10 performers, Italia 2:04%, Zephyr 
2:07%, Hymettus (3) 2:08% and Bellemont 2.09%, 
but one, Zephyr, is out of a record holding dam, she 
being the daughter of Gazelle 2:11%, dam of Zo- 
lock 2:05%. Of Zombro's ten 2:15 performers, but 
one other, Clara B. 2:13%, is from a record mare— 
Scrappose 2:16%, pacing. 

In this connection it might be well to state that 
a table recently printed in the Chicago Horse Re- 
view showed that of the sixteen 2:20 trotters sired 
by the great stallion Bingen 2:06% all but five 
were out of mares with records below 2:18, the 
famous Nancy Hanks 2:04 and Fanella 2:13 being 
among the matrons that had helped Bingen in the 
production of his list of fast performers. According 
to the development theory, therefore, Zombro*s pre- 
potency as a sire of speed is the more remarkable 
from the fact that he has not been assisted by 
having a large proportion of fast record holding 
mares bred to him, but has established his reputation 
from non-record mares of all lines of breeding. 

Zombro will make the spring season of 1908 at the 
home of his owner, Geo. T. Beckers, 3949 South 
Figueroa street, Los Angeles, at the very moderate 
fee of $50. 



MOVED DOWN TOWN 
The Breeder and Sportsman 
is now located in the 
PACIFIC BUILDING, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, San Francisco. 
Offices 363, 365 and 366 



Every horseman in the country who has ever met 
J. H. Neal, now Town Clerk of Pleasanton, and also 
Deputy Postmaster of that town, will sympathize 
with him in the loss of his wife, which occurred last 
month, after an illness of nearly two years. When 
"Jo" Neal was with Monroe Salisbury as superin- 
tendent of his racing stables, as) well as the breeding 
farm where Director 2:17 and Direct 2:05% were 
the stallions used, he met and had business rela- 
tions with horsemen and breeders all over the United 
States, and since severing his connection with Mr. 
Salisbury years ago has been a citizen of Pleasan- 
ton, near which town he was born. He has occupied 
many positions of trust and there is not a citizen 
of that town more respected or held in higher es- 
teem than he. He was a valuable aid to the Pleas- 
anton Matinee Club in the management of its very 
successful meeting last year, and still retains a 
deep interest in all harness horse matters, although 
his other duties have kept him from being an active 
participant in them, except during the Pleasanton 
meetings, when he always is called upon to act as 
clerk of the course, being particularly efficient in 
that line. The death of the partner of his joys and 
sorrows for many years, while not a surprise, was 
a shock to all, and Mr. Neal and his children have 
the deej) sympathy of everyone with whom they 
were acquainted. 

o 

Mr. J. W. Zibbell, who had the best two-year-old 
trotter in California last year in the Futurity winner 
Katalina 2:22% by Tom Smith 2:13%, came up from 
Fresno this week and went to Sonoma to get a 
four-year-old filly by Seymour Wilkes 2:08%, out of 
a mare by Silver Bow 2:16, that he had recently pur- 
chased on an order from Mr. Geo. II. Estabrook 
of Denver, Colo., the gentleman who purchased Capt. 
Batchelder's mare Perfection last year from Chas. 
De Ryder for $10,000. Mr. Zibbell has orders to 
take the filly to Fresno and train her, and she is 
said to be a very fine prospect for a record breaker. 
She was bought from Mr. W. C. Nolan of Sonoma. 
In a letter to Mr. Zibbell, Mr. Estabrook states that 
he recently purchased the filly Dorothy Axworthy 
that took a two-year-old record of 2:21% last year, 
also the unmarked peacer Whitelock, that is con- 
sidered good enough to race anywhere in any com- 
pany, and they, with others of Mr. Estabrook's 
horses, will be trained at Denver by Gus Macey. The 
price paid tor Dorothy Axworthy was $7,000, and 
she is entered in the Kentucky Futurity, Horse He- 
view and other big stakes for this year. Macey 
will get Silver Band 2:10%, trotting, and Tommy 
Grattan 2:12%, pacing, ready for the races also, and 
the chances an? that Mr. Estabrook will have a most 
formidable string. It is to be hoped that good luck 
will attend them, as an owner who is game enough 
to stay in the game after having so much bad luck 
as Mr. Estabrook has met with is entitled to some 
of the good things that, are distributed annually 



among horse owners. Mr. Zibbell reports all the 
horses at Fresno doing well, and says the young 
things by Tom Smith are all showing lots of trot. 
Zibbell with have Prof. Heald's stallion Advertisor 
by Advertiser 2:15 in the stud this year and may 
race him. * " 
o 

P. W. Hodges, who is now located at Pleasanton, 
has a couple of five-year-old stallions that are at- 
tracting much attention from horsemen. Both are 
by Zombro, one being out of a mare by Nutwood 
Wilkes, the other out of Hazel Kinney 2:09%, there- 
fore inbred to McKinney. I'matilla Chief, as the one 
from the Nutwood Wilkes mare is called, looks like 
a trotter that would beat 2:10 away off, and the 
fact that he worked the Brace half-mile track last 
year a mile in 2:14 is pretty good evidence that 
he could do 2:10 right then. The one out of Hazel 
Kinney has trotted a mile in 2:17. Mr. Hodges has 
never advertised these stallions for public service, 
but bred them to a few of his own mares as three- 
year-olds. Mr. Hodges has a filly by Owynex 2:22%, 
out of the fast pacing mare Queen It. 2:12% by Re- 
dondo, that is as fine as a thoroughbred and has 
two-minute speed. She is a perfectly gaited pacer, 
game and with every racing quality except that she 
is not as level headed as a race horse should be, so 
he has concluded to breed her to Star Pointer 1:59% 
this season, and not train her until she has raised 
a colt and settled a little. As the old champion is 
one of the best headed horses in the world, the pro- 
duce of this union, if it has his head, should be a 
world beater. Hodges has a four-year-old by Neer- 
nut 2:12%, out of a sister to Greco B. by McKin- 
ney, second dam by Anteeo, third dam the dam of 
Lou Dillon, that is showing a great deal of speed. 
A couple of broodmares that he is offering for sale 
are nice lookers and elegantly bred. They are by 
Freckels, son of Wilton, one being out of Miss 
Patchen by Mambrino Patchen, the other out of a 
mare by Redondo, son of Stamboul. 

o 

Jack Phippen has a row of prospects in his stalls 
at Pleasanton track, from which some great speed 
is bound to develop before the summer months are 
here. He has among others a filly coming two 
years old, owned by Capt. C. H. Williams of Palo 
Alto, that is only just nicely broken, but is showing 
that she has a high rate of natural speed. She is 
by the Captain's young stallion Unimak, own brother 
to Sterling McKinney 2:09%, and out of Alta Nola 
2:20 by Altamont, second dam by Nutwood. With 
just ten days' work at the Pleasanton track Nalta W., 
as she is called, stepped a quarter in 47% seconds 
and an eighth in 28 seconds on a trot and good 
gaited. This is remarkable for the practice she has 
had, and goes to show that Unimak is another pro- 
ducing son of the great McKinney, and will not only 
get speed, but early speed. Nalta W. is one of the 
oldest of his get, as she was sired when Unimak 
was a three-year-old in 1905, being a foal of 1906. 
He was bred to but for or five mares that year, and 
there are that number of foals. Nalta W. is the only 
one being worked so far, but they are all nice look- 
ers. Breeders will use good judgment if they look 
this great bred son of McKinney over before settling 
upon a stallion to breed to this season. 

o 

Farmer Bunch brought his mare Zella Mac 2:26% 
back with him when he returned from his Eastern 
campaign and has her now at Pleasanton in as fine 
shape as any horse at the track. Her legs are as 
clean and sound as a hound's tooth, showing that 
the many races she started in must have been rather 
easy for her. She won six races without having to 
trot faster thah 2:26%. all of them over half-mile 
tracks in the Southern States, where she was raced. 
She was the Farmer's bread winner during the sum- 
mer, and he refused many tempting offers for her 
that were a shade below the price he thought her 
worth. Zella Mac is a large, well-made mare with 
nice, clean trotting action and one of the best bred 
of the McKinneys. Her dam is Minnie Alto by 
Iran Alto 2:12%, son of Palo Alto 2:08%, second 
dam Princess Dawn by Dawn 2:18%, son of Nutwood 
2:18%, third dam Edith 2:10 by Dexter Prince, 
fourth dam by Hamilton Chief, fifth dam by the 
thoroughbred horse Imported Bclshazzar. Bunch 
may take Zella Mac East again this year, but if 
not will enter her in all the big trotting stakes on 
the Pacific Coast, as he thinks her good enough to 
win some of the money, no matter how fast they 
trot. 

o 

Col. J. C. Kirkpatrick usually spends the Week 
end with his family in their pretty bungalow at 
Pleasanton, and takes great pleasure in driving 
some of his horses. He jogs Charley D. and oc- 
casionally lets the son of McKinney brush an eighth 
at pretty fair speed. Charley D. never looked better 
than he does now. The Colonel has a chestnut 
mare in Deltyder's care that has all the signs of 
a fast trotter. She is by Sidney Dillon, out of Flora 
M 2:16 by Richard's Elector. She has a good deal 
of knee action and seems to be good heeded and able 
to go the mile out at speed. A mile in 2:28% with 
the last quarter in 35 seconds is the best that has 
been asked of her as yet, and she answered it in a 
manner that was very satisfactory. 

o 

W. 10. Ditels of Pleasanton. who purchased from 
S. K. Coram a filly by Nutwood Wilkes that Is 
entered in the Breeders' Futurity, is keeping her 
paid up, as he thinks she has a chance to be among 
the first four in the three-year-old race this year. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



| NOTES AND NEWS I 

I i 

For list of foals on which fifth payment of $10 
each was made January 2d, in Pacific Breeders' Fu- 
turity No. 6, see page 11. 



Get your stallion advertisements in the Breeder 
and Sportsman as soon as possible and don't fail to 
have them in the big stallion edition which will be 
issued February 15th. 



Stallion cards, gotten out in the very latest style 
and most complete in every way are now being 
printed at this office from brand new type. 



Lynwood W. 2:20, sire of Sonoma Girl, and Charley 
Belden, will again make the season at Santa Rosa, 
where he has been for several years. His owner. H. 
A. Carlton, thought for a while that he would take 
the great sire to Stockton for the season of 190S. 
but so great was the demand for Lynwood W.'s 
services from the breeders of Sonoma county that he 
concluded to remain there. His fee will be $50. 



The 2:05 class pacers will furnish great races on 
the Coast this summer if the purses offered them 
are big enough to keep them at home. Inferlotta 
2:04% has proven to be not with foal, and a race 
in which she would meet Sir John S. 2:04%. Sherlock 
Holmes 2:06% and a few more of the wind splitters, 
would draw a crowd that would tax the capacity of 
the grand stand anywhere. 



Silver Dick, the pacer that won a matinee race 
at Los Angeles on Christmas Day, is by Geo. W. 
McKinney 2:14%, an own brother to Mr. Frank J. 
Kilpatrick's new purchase, Washington McKinney. 
Silver Dick won his race by taking the first and 
third heats in 2:11% and 2:12. On the 11th inst. 
he again won, this time in straight heats in 2:12% 
and 2:12. Silver Dick is out of a mare by Bob 
Mason. He looks like a good prospect to race. 



The pacer Silver Coin 2:10 by Steinway out of 
Jenny Mac 2:09 by McKinney is beginning to show 
as a sire. The bay gelding Siegfried that paced a 
mile in 2:12 last Saturday in a matinee at Los An- 
geles, winning his race, is by Silver Coin. He is 
owned by Frank B. Long and looks like a comer. 



Frank Lieginger of Stockton owns two good mares 
that he expects to present him with foals this spring. 
One is by Dorsey's Nephew, the other by Alex 
Button, and both have speed. He bred them last 
year to Western Mac, a fine looking and well bred 
son of McKinney that is out of a Stamboul mare, 
second dam by Hawthorne. Mr. Lieginger expects 
something pretty good from this breeding. 



There is a chance that Stockton will be in the 
California Circuit again. On Monday evening next 
the horsemen of that city will attend a banquet and 
convention at which a board of directors of the San 
Joaquin Valley Driving Association will be elected 
and a new constitution and by-laws submitted. It is 
proposed that this club will hold matinees during 
the summer commencing about May 1st, when the 
track will be in good shape to drive over, and there 
is a strong feeling that a regular harness race 
meeting should be held at which fair purses would 
be hung up. The breeding interests of San Joaquin 
and adjoining counties are very large and many 
good stallions are owned there, as well as a large 
number of well bred mares. We know the Stockton 
horsemen will make a success of this venture if 
they undertake it. 



Hollister will probably lose its race track and fair 
grounds, as the Hollister Land Company sold the 
property last week to parties who propose tearing 
down the buildings and cutting the fifty-one acres up 
into small tracts. The price paid was $6,250. San 
Benito county's citizens would have done a good 
thing had they purchased this property for a fair 
ground. 



Payments of $25 each were made January 1st on 
twenty-one three-year-olds that are eligible to the 
Occident Stake for three-year-olds, to be trotted this 
year at the California State Fair. The probabilities 
are that each and every one of these three-year-olds 
will be in training by March 1st 



This number of the Breeder and Sportsman is a 
good one to preserve, as it contains the lists of en- 
tries in the three stakes offered by the California 
Breeders Association of Los Angeles, the lists of 
entries in the Occident stakes of 1908 and 1909, 
besides the list of two-year-olds on which payments 
were made January 2d in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
No. 6. These lists will be valuable for reference. 



Thos. Ronan is breaking a colt by Stam B. 2:11% 
out of Mountain Maiden by Cresco, the dam of Tom 
Carneal 2:08%, Kenneth C. 2:13%, etc. The colt 
is a good looker although he is yet "in the rough" 
with a winter coat of long hair, and steps out like 
a sure trotter driven to a heavy breaking cart. He 
is an own brother to S. K. Trefry's Ben Hur, a colt 
that will be heard from this year if raced and that 
can show a 2:15 clip any day. 



Barney Simpson has been receiving letters from 
Chico breeders who are so well pleased with their 
colts by his horse Arner 2:17% that they want more 
of them, and desire Barney to make another season 
with him there. He is waiting to see whether the 
proposed track is to be built there, however, as he 
lias a number of young Arners to tain this year and 
must locate where there is a track. He thinks a 
track at Chico would make it the best horse town 
in the State. 



Frank Jermyn is again in California after spend- 
ing the summer on the Grand Circuit and the fall in 
and around New York, and visits Pleasanton nearly 
every week. He owns a couple of two-year-old fillies 
by Lynnwood W., sire of Sonoma Girl, that look like 
good ones, and will be given a chance to prove it. 



Lee Wells, President of the Pleasanton Matinee 
Club, is one of the busiest men in Alameda county 
at the present time, but always finds time to talk 
with anyone who has the welfare of the club at 
heart. While the club held one of the best meet- 
ings ever given in California, last year, the cash 
balance after all bills were paid was not as large as 
the members expected and they look for a few con- 
cessions this year before announcing another race 
meeting. 



DeRyder has Dr. McLaughlin's two grays by 
Gossiper in his string at the present time, and will 
sample them a little this spring. They have both 
worked miles below 2:15, driven by amateurs, and 
act as though they might trot faster. The Doctor 
enjoys driving them and hopes the matinees at 
Pleasanton will be revived this summer. 



We think Henry Helman has brought to California 
one of the best bred young stallions that ever came 
to the Coast in the two-year-old Alconda, that he 
has now at Pleasanton and will place in the stud this 
year to a few mares at $30. Alconda is by the great 
Jay Bird, one of Geo. Wilkes greatest sons, beyond 
any doubt. Alconda's dam is the producing marc 
Alma Wilkes by Baron Wilkes, another of the great 
sires by Geo. Wilkes, and one that has earned tin- 
title of Founder of the Futurity Winning Family, 
owing to his descendants winning so many of these 
big stakes. The second dam of Helman's colt is 
Almeta by Almont 33, and his third dam that greatest 
of all brood mares Alma Mater by Mambrino 
Patchen. Any person at all acquainted with trotting 
pedigrees will see at a glance that this Jay Bird 
colt has nothing but producing blood in his veins 
for generations back. As he is a grand looking 
youngster, and is limited to a very few select mares, 
his book should be full within a very few weeks. 



The Oregon State Fair will renew the two $5,000 
stakes that were so popular last year, when they 
were given for 2:15 trotters and 2:09 pacers. Cali- 
fornia trainers will again try to "get the candy" in 
both. 



An item that will be of interest to all horse owners 
is the following from last week's issue of the Liver- 
more Herald: "One of our alive and up-to-date 
farmers has found a way by which he can make his 
horses use up to a good advantage the poor hay- 
raised on the ranch. H. A. Bettencourt, while look- 
ing over one of the farm journals, learned that 
horses could be made to eat poor hay with great 
relish if it were sprinkled over with a little cheap 
molasses and water. He tried it and has made a 
great success. The horses no longer waste the hay, 
but clean up every whisp of it that is thrown in 
the manger and look well. This has been tried in 
the southern part of California, where hay is scarce 
and where cheaper qualities of food have to be 
used. The molasses used can be obtained at the 
Sugar-Beet Factory in Alvarado. 



Says the Rural Spirit: But few people know that 
the world-famous trotting mare Sonoma Girl was 
entered in the big trotting stake at Salem in 1904, 
but went lame that year and was turned out. This 
goes to show the class of horses these big stakes 
draw to the State Fair. Sweet Marie, the greatest 
race mare in America, was attracted by these big 
stakes in 1903. Big money brings the big horses 
and the big horses draw the crowds. 



Nutwood 2:18% was certainly a wonderful sire of 
broodmares. Twenty of this year's new standard 
performers are out of Nutwood mare's, which gives 
Nutwood a total of 305 through his daughters, or 
nearly 100 more than his nearest competitor, Red 
Wilkes, whose daughters have produced 217. 



The service fee of Todd 2:14%, the $30,000 stallion, 
has been placed at $200 for the season of 1908. 



Any owner who does not have a few entries in 
the Eastern colt stakes this year will be overlooking 
the harvest when it is ripe. There never was a time 
when foals could be staked for so little money. 
Whether one intends to race East or not, a few 
entries will be money well invested. 



It is said that Gen. W. B. Chisholm, proprietor of 
Thistle Doune Farm, at Randall. Ohio, will pay Cali- 
fornia a visit shortly. This farm will campaign a 
racing stable in 1908, with Bert Shank as trainer, 
and it may be that the General will keep his eye 
open for something extra good among the trotters 
and pacers in training in California. 



McKinney 2:11%, whose service fee last year was 
$500, is advertised at $300 for the season of 1908. 



Lotta 2:08% was purchased for Max Woss of 
Vienna. Austria, a wealthy gentleman, who races 
a private stable in that country. 



Portland will -soon announce six big early closing 
events for its big fall meeting. All will be harness 
events. 



J. V. Perry of Concord recently purchased from 
Rees Jones of Martinez the pacer Martinez Boy, and 
will use him on the road. 



Fanny Dillard 2:03% and Trilby Direct 2:08%, re- 
turned to this country from England a year ago, are 
in foal to Baron H. 2:19 and will be bred to Direct 
Hal 2:04% after having their foals. 



Geo. R. Hall of Boston is to drive Cinch 2:08% and 
Terrill S. 2:08% to pole, while Tuna 2:08% and 
Czarina Dawson 2:11% are to be used as a team on 
the Philadelphia speedway by Oliver H. Hair. 



Walter Cox thinks thinks that the folks who con- 
sider Thornway 2:05% outclassed are away off. He 
says that the past season is the only one that the 
son of Steinway has had half a chance, and another 
year he looks for him to reach his real form. 



The death of G. A. Hosington of Adams, N. Y., is 
reported, having occurred on December 27th, at the 
age of 70 years. Mr. Hosington has been promi- 
nently identified with the harness horse industry for 
over thirty years. His first horse of note was the 
stallion Gen. Benton, that in 1872 he sold to Gov- 
ernor Stanford for $25,000. 



Joe Cuicello has a five-year-old stallion by Sidney 
Dillon, out of Ladywell 2:16% by Electioneer, that 
he desires to lease to a responsible party for the 
stallion season of 1908. as he does not wish to train 
the horse this year. This is a well made young 
horse that should be profitable in good hands. See 
advertisement. 



Mr. P. W. Hellingall, the San Francisco customs 
broker, has as great a proportion of prospects among 
the youngsters of his breeding as any stock farm 
in the country can show. He has now at Pleasanton 
three fillies coming two years old, all out of Secre- 
tary mares. Two are by Kinney Lou 2:07%, and one 
by Del Coronado 2:09%. One of the Kinney Lou 
fillies is a trotter and the other a pacer, and both 
show remarkably well for youngsters that are only 
just being broken. The trotter showed a 2:20 gait 
last month, and the pacer, although it has only 
been in harness a few times, has a way of going 
that makes her look like oil in the can. The Del 
Coronado is a square going trotter with a most de- 
termined way of going and great natural speed. 
All are very fine lookers and Lou Carillo, who is 
taking care of them is in love with all three. 



No more forcible evidence of the sensational prog- 
ress uiat has been made in the development of the 
trotter and pacer can be had than a comparison of 
the number of extreme speed performers at both 
gaits at the close of the racing season of 1908 and 
those at the present time — a period of ten years. At 
the close of 1898 the world's trotting champion was 
Alix 2:03% and only two other trotters had taken 
records of 2:05 or better, these being Nancy Hanks 
2:04 and Azote 2:04%. The list of pacers with rec- 
ords of 2:05 or better numbered twenty-two, and of 
these only four had records faster than 2:03, namely, 
the champion Star Pointer 1:59%, John R. Gentry 
2:00%, Joe Patchen 2:01% and Robert J. 2:01%. So 
that ten years ago the total number of trotters and 
pacers in the 2:05 list was just twenty-five. At the 
close of the racing season of 1907 we find no less 
than one hundred and seven members of the 2:05 
list, thirteen trotters and ninety-four pacers. The 
last season added but one trotter to the list. Main- 
sheet 2:05, while seventeen pacers became eligible, 
which would go to show that it takes a consistent 
2:05 pacer to make good on the Grand Circuit. — Stock 
Farm. 



A Kentucky correspondent of the American Horse 
Breeder says: "J. H. Thayer is getting things in 
shape for the removal of himself and family to 
California. The climate of that State is not un- 
familiar to him, as he once lived on the other side 
of the Rockies. After selling his horses, including 
The Bondsman and about a dozen others at the 
Midwinter sale in New York, he will dispose of his 
real estate holdings in Kentucky before taking his 
departure for the Golden Slope. Mr. Thayer is a 
native of Georgia and has made a fortune in the 
trotting horse business. He hopes to regain his 
health in California. 



A. P. Church, the Pleasanton track-horse shoer, 
has sold his colt by Bonnie McK. 36569 (McKinney- 
Bousilene 2:14%) out of an Austrian mare, to Mr. 
McBride of Oregon, the latter paying $500 for the 
colt. Mr. McBride has got a good one in the opinion 
of every horseman on the track and as Henry 
Helman is to train the youngster it has a chance to 
do all claimed for it. It is coming two years old 
and has recently taken to pacing. Mr. McBride saw 
the colt pace a quarter in 39 seconds the day,, he 
bought it. 



Saturday, January 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



NEWS OF LOS ANGELES HORSES AND HORSE- 
MEN. 



[J. R. Fronefield.] 

A few more than one hundred and fifty trotters 
and pacers are in training at Agricultural Park. 

Infeiiotta 2:04% is not In foal after all, and will 
be out again this year for all the money in sight 
in her class. 

W. H. Murray of Cleveland. Ohio, owner of Italia 
2:04% by Zombro, reports this mare due to foal 
soon to Moko, and has ordered that she be bred back 
to him. At the Walnut Hall Farm Italia is pro- 
nounced one of the best looking mares in the harem. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings has just lately engaged Mr. 
W. H. Bayless to take charge of her training stable 
and seven head of choicely bred and extra good-look- 
ing youngsters have been taken up. Mr. Bayless 
comes well recommended' and considerable may be 
expected from several that he will try out. Two 
choice mares at this place are Sappho 2:15% by 
Robert McGregor, in foal to Del Coronado 2:09%, 
and Princess Louise 2 : 09%, in foal to Redlac 2:07%. 
A colt that should surely show himself a trotter is 
by Parole, out of Sappho. He has all the ear marks 
of a fast horse and is handsome, .ludge Dillon by 
Sidney Dillon, out of Eveline, the grandam of So- 
noma Girl 2:05%, etc., will be trained and raced, and 
in the meantime priced right to a buyer. 

Geo. T. Beckers has decided that Zombro 2:11 
shall make the season of 1908 right at home and 
will pay the shipping expenses one way on suitable 
mares sent from the upper country, where the horse 
is well known and has been liberally patronized. 

Beside the great speed sire Zombro 2:11, George 
Beckers has a young stallion by Stam B. 2:11%, out 
of Whisper, the dam of Zombro. This is a show 
horse and a perfect specimen of the trotting bred 
cob. He goes extremely high all around, also car- 
ries the blood that gets race horses. 

Jake Levy, now living in Los Angeles, but re- 
cently from New Mexico, has two good pacers in 
the stables of Fred Ward. Mr. Levy is a member of 
the Driving Club and thoroughly enjoyed training 
Shecam 2:12% for the last matinee. The horse 
had not been to the races for a long time and was 
nothing near ready when he started, but after an 
easy mile the first heat showed in the second trip 
that he will do later on. The other horse is a green 
pacer called Robert S., that has been a half in 1:06 
over a half-mile track. 

C. T. Hewitt & Son have a stable of fourteen head. 
As they have fully determined that Infeiiotta is not 
in foal, and her early preparation for many fast miles 
this season has already commenced. She is walked 
four miles every day beside a saddle horse and 
about the first of February will be asked to jog. 
She is higher in flesh, sound as a bell, and couldn't 
possibly be in any better condition to go into train- 
ing for miles that will be worth going to see if 
the right bunch of pacers hook up together. They 
have a trotter in Don Z., a gelding by Stam B. 2:11%, 
out of a Lottery mare, that Mr. Hewitt likes, and an- 
other that he is sweet on is Phyllis C, a five-year-old 
mare by Zombro, out of an Altamont dam, that after 
working a mile in 2:14 and a half in 1:05 last year 
was carried over. Nothing fast has been asked of 
her yet this winter. Hewitt & Son like the horse 
show end of the business, as well as to race, and 
have a mare with lots of class in Lena Rivers. She 
goes extremely high all around and will win most 
anywhere. Their only stallion is a saddle-bred fel- 
low by Hermoso by Rex Montgomery 2011, out of 
Thelma by Gloster Denmark. This colt is a two- 
year-old and in a class by himself when it comes 
to looks and action, and should be a nice horse to 
breed to. 

Red McK. by McKinney, out of Bonnie Red by Red 
Wilkes, owned by Mr. Murphy of Los Angeles, is 
the kind of stallion that needs no comment. In 
breeding and individuality he speaks for himself, and 
he will soon enter the list of speed sires, as his get 
are commencing to step. ' 

Will G. Durfee's and Walter Maben's stables are 
full of speed prospects that can show right now. 
Each of these trainers has a large stable and much 
could be said about nearly every horse in both 
strings. I will only state here that "The Pig" in 
Maben's hands is all that has been said about him 
as a horse of phenomenal speed at the pace, and 
has the cut of a real race horse. Durfee is well 
supplied with speed siring stallions in Del Coronado 
2:09%, Petigru 2:10V 2 and Carlokin 2:13%. In 
Regalo, matinee record 2:09, Durfee thinks he has 
a better trotter than Sweet Marie 2:02, and that 
really great mare was sheltered many days in the 
very same stall that Regalo occupies. Clara Madi- 
son, a slashing two-year-old filly by Del Coronado, 
out of a mare by James Madison, is entitled to spe- 
cial mention as a trotter, also the full brother to 
Copa de Oro 2:07% — but I said I would not say 
more. They all step. 

Everything sired by Highland C. 2:19%, the horse 
that Henry Struve of Watsonville recently leased 
from W. A. Ciark Jr., shows lots of speed. In Mr. 
Clark's stable here Gerrety has a three-year-old filly 
that is trotting like an old campaigner, stepping a 
mile in 2:37, last quarter in 37 seconds, and is a 
sample of this stallion's get. Bon Voyage (3) 2:12% 
will be raced again this year. Those who have not 
seen this horse for some time will hardly recognize 
him. He has developed into a grand looking big 
horse, and it is freely predicted that he will carry 
plenty of flesh all through his campaign. Mr. Ger- 



rety has been a mile in 2:18 with him, and a quar- 
ter in 31 seconds since coining down here, lie lias 
all of his speed and everyone wishes him good luck 
and a lower mark. His weanlings that are being 
handled are a superb lot and would be a credit to 
any sire. 

In compliment to "Ted" Hayes, Mr. Clark gave 
him a colt sired by Bon Voyage 2:T2%, out of Ruth 
Mary by Directum 2:05%, second dam Tuna 2:12%, 
the dam of Buck 2:20 by Ethan Allen Jr., that has 
turned out to be the record breaker of California, 
if not of the world. The colt is now about nine 
months old, and of average size. On January loth, 
hitched to a long-shaft Payne sulky, pulling Mr. 
Hayes, weighing about 165 pounds, he trotted a 
quarter of a mile in 43% seconds, and the last eighth 
in 21% seconds. The colt did not seem to be trying, 
at that, for he was more interested in a bunch of 
colts in the infield and a flock of pigeons on the 
track close to the grandstand than he was in making 
a record. 

.1. ft. Williams has a stable of twelve head, in- 
cluding several good matinee performers. Danube 
2:12% and his full brother Dinero (4) 2:20, are two 
nice stallions, that will serve a few mares, but Mr. 
Williams' main reliance in the stud this season will 
be Limonero 2:15%. He will make a full season at 
the home stable, and as he is well known and has 
colts to his credit, will get all that is coming to him. 

Charles Thayer is located just outside the track 
with Six Bells and some of his colts that are surely 
a handsome lot. This stallion is an inbred Chimes 
and stamps his get with trot. 

In about a month I. C. Mosher will take up the 
Montana bred pacer Mandolin 2:10 and give him a 
careful preparation for the races. This gelding is 
now fully grown and seasoned, and will take a lot 
of beating this year. 

Mr. G. A. Pounder finds training his own horses a 
source of pleasure, and is very enthusiastic in doing 
all he can to help the light harness horse business. 
He is just now breaking the full sister to Sonoma 
Girl, that he has named Lotta Lynwood, about the 
handsomest filly in the world. It may be she is too 
good looking to beat her sister, but we will wait and 
see. He is also going carefully with a green mare 
called Wenza by Zolock 2:05%, out of a mare by 
Nutford. She has had several miles between 2:15 
and 2:20, and an occasional brush at a very fast clip. 
o 

SAN BERNARDINO MATINEE. 



Excellent sport was had at Association Park, San 
Bernardino, on the afternoon of January 8th, by mem- 
bers of the Driving Club there. The track was a 
little slow, owing to rain the day before, but was 
in fair condition. The San Bernardino band fur- 
nished music. 

The races were all clean-cut, and a number of 
close finishes, especially in the 2:40 pace and 2:20 
pace, helped to make plenty of excitement for the 
crowd. The race in which the most interest of the 
afternoon centered was probably the 2:20 pace, which 
went to Adalantha in two straight heats, though 
Dewey, owned by John Lazenby of Riverside, made; 
a hard fight for honors. The summaries: 



Trotting, 2:40 class- 
Ben Z., Rutherford & Young 1 1 

Lady Patrick, H. H. Eastwood 2 2 

Mark Twain, J. T. Wells 3 3 

Time— 2:31 y 2 , 2:42. 

Pacing, 2:40 class — 

Velox, C. H. Thomas 1 1 

Wampo, A. S. Fettler 3 2 

Redlands, R. T. Curtis 2 4 

Coupon, J. T. Garner 4 3 

Time— 2:301/2, 2:30. 

Trotting, 2:50 class — 

Lot, Frank Pond 1 1 

Prince Valentine, G. F. Carrigan 2 2 

Ole, John Lazenby 3 3 

Time— 2:51, 2:51%. 

Pacing, 2:20 class— 

Adalantha, G. W. Prescott 1 1 

Dewey, John Lazenby 2 2 

Maidie, G. II. Judd 3 3 

Time— 2:20, 2:20. 

o 



A Californian who has been putting in a good part 
of his evenings this winter reading the different, 
theories of breeding fast trotters, and who recently 
saw the statement made that the champion three- 
year-old mare Fantasy 2:08% was to be mated this 
year with the champion three-year-old stallion Gen. 
Watts 2:06%, says he would like the different theo- 
rists to make a prediction now in accordance with 
their theories, as to the speed and the gait of the 
foal. He says that according to the development 
theory the foal should be a world beater when three 
years old, while according to the "antis" it will not 
trot as fast as one sired by the same colt but out 
of some mare without a record, while cacording to 
still another theorist it will have to go to a good 
school before it will be able to do much of any- 
thing. He says that if these writers would only 
make up the proofs to establish their theories from 
the list of foals nominated in the Futurities isntead 
of from the Year Books, and print these proofs before 
the colts trot or pace their races, the public would 
be better able to judge their value. 



LOS ANGELES MATINEES. 



The Los Angeles Driving Club held a matiuee on 
Christmas Day, which has not been heretofore re- 
ported in these columns, but which was a big suc- 
cess in every way. Fast time was made in three of 
the events. Hazel Kinney 2:09% is still able to 
hold her own with the fastest trotters owned in 
the club, and in a special event trotted the first 
and third heats in 2:15 and 2:15%. Ida Millerton 
winning the second heat in 2:14. In the pacing 
free-for-all Silver Dick, a gelding by Geo. W. McKin- 
ney, won the first and second heats in the fast 
time of 2:11% and 2:12, while Cleopatra, a sorrel 
mare by Zolock, took the second heat in 2:12%. In 
the free-for-all trot Regalo by Osito won the first 
heat in 2:09, but the Zombro mare Bellemont took 
the next two in 2:11%. There was a large crowd 
to see the sport. 

On Saturday last, January 11th, another excellent 
matinee was given, and five good races decided. 
Seigfried, a bay gelding by Silver Coin 2:10, won 
the first race, pacing the first heat in 2:11. Zombretta 
by Zombro captured the second race, trotting the 
third and final heats in 2:13%. Silver Dick won the 
free-for-all pace, fastest time 2:12. Artesia by Iris 
took the 2:30 pace in straight heats, both in 2:18, 
while the last race went to Zom Woolsey by Zombro, 
fastest heat 2:27. The summaries of the two meet- 
ings follow: 

Christmas Day Races. 

Trotting, 2:30 class — 
Liberty Song, b g by Liberty Chimes 

(Clark) 1 2 4 1 

Willow, br g by Zombro (Holcomb) 4 12 2 

Charley Wilkes, b g by Nutwood Wilkes 



(Sadler) 3 

Nat Bruen (Snowden) 2 


4 

3 


1 
3 


3 
4 


Almo (Deffebach) 5 


5 


dr 




Time— 2:28, 2:26%, 2:26%, 2:27. 








Trotting, special — 








Hazel Kinney, br m by McKinney (Rey- 








nolds) 


1 


2 


1 


Ida Millerton, br m by Millerton (Delorey).. 


2 


1 


2 


Gen. Boodle, br g by Boodle (Fritz) 


3 


3 


3 


Time,2:15, 2:14, 2:15%. 








Mixed, 3:00 class — 








Angie Duryea, b m by Duryea (Hummelbaugh) 


1 


1 


Lenora M., b m by Petigru (Morehead) .... 




2 


2 


Monk R. (Watkins) 




3 


3 


Time— 2:30, 2:33. 








Pacing, 2:30 class — 








Beulah, ch m by Nutwood Wilkes (Clark) 




1 


1 


Joe Athby, b h by Athby (Nowlin) 




2 


5 


Artesia, b h by Iris (Jonas) 




a 


Q 


Isabelle (Love) 




9' 

o 


9 
• > 


Zella Z. (Dickson) 




g 


A 
t 


Rancho del Paso (Delorey) 




4 


g 


Tom Hayes (Snowden) 




o 


O 

o 


Irish (Watkins) 




o 
o 


7 
l 


Lady Sefton (Walker) 




7 
1 


if 


Time— 2:26, 2:24. 








Pacing, free-for-all — 








Silver Dick, gr g by Geo. W. McKinney (Rey- 








nolds) 


1 


9 
£i 


1 


Cleopatra, s m by Zolock (Garland) 


2 


1 


o 


McO'Dea, rn g by Zolock (Pounder) 


3 


9 
O 


o 
6 


Time— 2:11%, 2:11%, 2:12. 








Trotting, free-for-all — 








Bellemont, b m by Zombro (Smith) 


2 


1 


1 


Regalo, b g by Osito (Williams) 


1 


3 


2 




3 


2 


3 


Time— 2:09, 2:11%, 2:11%. 








Saturday, January 11th, Races. 








Pacing, 2:15 class — 












1 


1 


Lohengrin, b g bv Charleston (Dodge) 




2 


2 






3 


3 


Time— 2:12, 2:14. 








Trotting, 2:14 class — 








Zombretta, br m by Zombro (Smith) 


2 


1 


1 


Modicum, b m by Geo. Ayers (Morris) 


1 


4 


■I 


Buck, b g by McKinnev (Clark) 


3 


2 


3 


Glennetta. b m by Rex Oifford (Keller) 


4 


3 


4 


Knight, b g by Geo. W. McKinney (Peters) 


6 


5 


6 


Sadie McK., blk m by Coronado (Garland) . . 


6 


dr 




Time— 2:17, 2:18%, 2:13%. 








Pacing, free-for-all — 








Silver Dick, gr g by Geo. W. McKinney (Pay- 










1 


1 


Cleopatra, s m by Zolock (Garland) 




2 


2 






3 


3 


Time— 2:12%, 2:12. 








Pacing, 2:30 class — 








Artesia, b h by Iris (Jonas) 




1 


1 


Zella Z., 8 in by Zombro (Dickson) 




2 


3 


Shecam, b m (Levy) 




4 


2 






3 


5 


El Diablo, s g (McLellan) 




6 


4 


Lady Sefton, b m (Walker) 




6 


6 


Time— 2:18, 2:18. 








Mixed, 2:40 class — 








Zom Woolsey, b h by Zombro (Sherwood) .. 




1 


1 






2 


4 






5 


2 






8 


3 


Vilda-V., b m (Higgins) 




4 


6 



Time— 2:30, 2:27. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



CALIFORNIA BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION STAKES. 



Entries Received for California Breeders' Futurity 
No. 1, California Breeders' Stake and 
Canfield Stakes. 

When the California Breeders' Association of Los 
Angeles was organized last year it inaugurated and 
arranged for three colt stakes, but by some inad- 
vertance only two were advertised. It seems that 
the California Breeders' Futurity No. 1, for the 
foals of mares bred in 1907, with conditions very 
similar to the Pacific Breeders' Futurity received 
187 entries. This stake is guaranteed to be worth 
$7,000. 

The California Breeders' Stake is the one that 
failed to be advertised, although blanks for it were 
sent out. It is for foals of 1907, to trot or pace 
as three-year-olds in 1910. It has reecived eighty- 
eight entries. This stake is for the money paid in, 
with $400 added by Mr. C. A. Canfield, president of 
the association. 

The Canfield Stake is for foals of 1907. to trot or 
pace as two-year-olds in 1909. This stake also has 
$400 added to the stake money by President Can- 
field. It received fifty entries. The lists of entries 
in all three stakes are as follows: 

California Breeders' Futurity No. 1. 

Jno. Suglian's Foxey by Valentine Boodle, bred to 
Tom Smith. 

Frank H. Burke's Wanda 2d by McKinney, bred to 
Bon Voyage; Lady Belle Isle by Eros, bred to Bonnie 
Direct. 

W. G. Durfee's Jessie Madison by Jas. Madison, 
bred to Del Coronado; Atherine oy Patron, bred to 
Del Coronado; No Name by Gen. Beverly, bred to Del 
Coronado; Directoc by Direct, bred to Del Coronado; 
Vela McKinney by McKinney, bred to Murray M.; 
Irene S. by Petigru, bred to Zolock; Rose of 
Peru by Charleston, bred to -Del Coronado; Belle 
Pointer by Star Pointer, bred to Del Coronado; 
Beatrice Zombro by Zombro, bred to Owynex; Lulu 
Wilkes by Bay Wilkes, bred to Del Coronado; Lady 
Alexandria by Bob Mason, bred to Del Coronado; 
Little Agnes by Gossiper, bred to Del Coronado; 
Polka Dot by Mendocino, bred to Del Coronado; 
Swift Bird by Waldstein, bred to Del Coronado; 
Queen S. by Sable Wilkes, bred to Del Coronado; 
Subito by Steinway, bred to Del Coronado; Nona 
by by Direcho, bred to Del Coronado; Tacoma by 
Guycesco, bred to Del Coronado; Queen Director by 
Montana Director, bred to Del Coronado. 

Cornell Bros.' Queen Basler by Robt. Direct, bred 
to Light Rose; Miss Stone by Stoneway, bred to 
Light Rose. 

W. A. Hunter's Lady B by Stephen A, bred to 
Turban. 

T. B. Gibson's Maggie by Soudan, bred to Iran 
Alto. 

C. A. Canfield's Mamie Elizabeth by Red Regent, 
bred to Walter Barker; Dixie W by Zolock, bred to 
Redlac; Cleo by Conifer, bred to Walter Barker; Sue 
by Athadon, bred to Walter Barker. 

H. J. Myres' Gladys M. by Ketchum, bred to Del 
Coronado. 

Alex. Brown's Majella B by Nushagak, bred to 
Prince Ansel; Daisy B by Waldstein, bred to Prince 
Ansel; Lottie by San Diego, bred to Prince Ansel; 
Lauress by Mendocino, bred to Prince Ansel; Serpole 
by Mendocino, bred to Prince Ansel; Josie D by 
Nutwood Wilkes, bred to Prince Ansel; Viola by Gen. 
Benton, bred to Prince Ansel; Mamie Martin by Nusli- 
gak, bred toPrince Ansel; Steina by Steinmont, bred 
agak, bred to Prince Ansel; Steina by Steinmont, 
bred to Nushagak; Zanita by Electricity, bred to 
Nushagak; Nosegay by Langton, bred to Nushagak. 

W. A. Clark Jr.'s Bay Leaf by Telephone, bred to 
Kenneth C; Bon Mot by Erin, bred to Moko; 
Centereye by On Stanley, bred to Highland C; 
Christobel by Chas. Derby, bred to Star Pointer; 
Electric Maiden by Electric Bell, bred to Tertius; 
Fussy B by Stam B, bred to Highland C; Lucy May 
by Oakland Baron, to Bon Voyage; Patty D. by Ulti- 
mus, bred to Highland C; Reino Del Diablo by Diablo 
bred to Highland C; Ruth Mary by Directum, bred 
to Bon Voyage; Sally Lunn by Wiggins, bred to 
Bon Voyage; She by Abbotsford, bred to Bon Voy- 
age. 

Mrs. L. J. Hastings' Princess Louise by Coronado, 
bred to Redlac; Sappho by Robt. McGregor, bred to 
Del Coronado. 

I. J. Garcia's Tanita by Gen. Beverly, bred to Del 
Coronado. 

C. Nanny's Lucy by Bismarck Jr.. bred to Athby. 

J. W. Snowden's Scrappy Nell by Pellatier, bred 
to Redlac; Minnie M. by Col. K. R., bred to Redlac. 

Geo. L. Warlow's Cora Wickersham by Junio, bred 
to Athadon; Narcola by Athadon, bred to Stanford 
McKinney; Sextette by Athablo, bred to Stanford Mc- 
Kinney; Lustrine by Onward, bred to Stanford Mc- 
Kinney; Santanette by Neernut, bred to Glen wood. 

Pat Sweeney's Lady R. by Col. K. R., bred to 
Athadon. 

Chester H. Warlow's Bessie by Yosemite, bred to 
Athadon. 

A. Allen's Lady Allen by Echo Chief, bred to Tom 
Smith. 

F. N. Frary's Ruth by Brigadier, bred to Herbert 
Dillon; Nora Falrose by Falrose, bred to Herbert 
Dillon. 

T. H. Brents' Reina del Norte by Del Norte, bred 
to Del Coronado. 

E. D. Dudley's Bee Sterling by Sterling, bred to 
Palite; Lorna Doone by Bayswater Wilkes, bred to 



Jules Verne; Paprika by Oro Belmont, bred to Palite. 

J. W. Marshall's Trix by Nutwood Wilkes, bred to 
Star Pointer; Madaline by Demonio, bred to Zolock; 
Lovanna by Dictatus, bred to Demonio. 

W. C. McCully's Concha by A. W. Richmond, bred 
to Cedric Mac. 

W. S. Harkey's Deviletta by Diablo, bred to Hal B. 

I. L. Borden's Allie Cresco by Cresco, bred to 
Harney Bernatto; La Belle Altaniont by Altamont, 
bred to Barney Bernatto. 

Dr. Wm. Dodge's Molly Rex by Atto Rex, bred to 
Limonero. 

Wm. Garland's Hawthorne by McKinney, bred to 
Redlac. 

J. N. Anderson's Nora D. by Del Sur, bred to Bon 

Voyage. 

J. F. Davis' Miss Sidney Dillon by Sidney Dillon, 
bred to Bon Voyage. 

J. H. Poole's Laurell Inca by Inca, bred to Direcct 
Heir. 

Alfred Solano's Vivandier by McKinney, bred to 
Audubon Boy. 

Dana Perkins' Zaza by Bay Bird, bred to Zombro. 

M. EL Tuttle's Ramona B. by Stam B., bred to 
Zombro. 

W. E. Tuttle's Maud McAlto by McKinney, bred 
to Zombro; Belle Carter by Nutwood Wiilkes, bred 
to Zombro. 

C. B. Bigelow's Lucy B. by Alex. Button, bred to 
Prince Ansel. 

Wm. Hashagen's Chitiwee by Chas. Derby, bred 
to Kinney Rose; Leta H. by Nutwood Wilkes, bred 
to Kinney Rose. 

Charles Burlock's Tia Juana by Kewannah, bred 
to Strathway; Dorothy Welborn by St. Vincent, bred 
to Strathway. 

Thomas Brodnax's Mary Chimes by Chimes, bred 
to Strathway; Bonnie Red by Red Wilkes, bred to 
Strathway. 

Zibbell & Son's Kate Lumry by Shadeland On- 
ward, bred to Tom Smith; Evangie by Shadeland On- 
ward, bred to Tom Smith. 

H. H. Helman's Electress Wilkes by Nutwood 
Wilkes, bred to Jay Bird colt. 

R. B. Moorehead's Mowitza by Soudan, bred to 
Del Coronado. 

James W. Rea's Mrs. Weller by McKinney, bred 
to Iran Alto. 

G. W. Pounder's Magnet by George Stock, bred 
to R. Ambush. 

F. B. Stockdale's Selda by Stormy John, bred to 
California Guide. 

F. E. Ward's Lady Madison by James Madison, 
bred to Zolock. 

G. A. Pounder's May M. by McKinney, bred to 
Audubon Boy; Nellie Lee by McKinney, bred to 
Johnnie Bull; Rosie O'Moore by Sidmoor, bred to 
Johnnie Bull. 

Wm. Morgan's Grace McK. by McKinney, bred to 
Direcho; Sona by McKinney, bred to Redlac. 

J. Walker's Lassie by Strathway, bred to Red McK. 

Carey Montgomery's Lady Caretta by Nutwood 
Wilkes, bred to Prince Ansel. 

J. A. Mackinnon's mare by Major Ban, bred 
to Sky Pointer Jr. 

Thomas Holmes' Happy Maid by Happy Prince, 
bred to Zolock. 

George W. Kirkman's Sweet Way by Stoneway, 
bred to Radium; Bell Basler by Robt. Basler, bred 
to Stoneway. 

J. A. Kirkman's Carrie by A. W. Richmond, bred 
to Stoneway; My Way by Stoneway, bred to Stone- 
way. 

J. H. Torrey's Manila by Shadeland Hero, bred to 
Zolock; Elloretta by Zombro, bred to Zolock. 

F. P. Ogden's Lou by Ira, bred to Monocrat. 

G. R. Myers' Neer Bird by Neernut, bred to Red 
McK. 

Chas. W. Winter's Pat tie McKinney by Geo. W. 
McKinney, bred to Redlac. 

Alex. H. Davidson's Lillian Zolock by Zolock, bred 
to Col. Green. 

Jacob Brolliar's Ethel Basler by Robt. Basler, bred 
to Best Policy. 

L. H. Todhunter's The Silver Bell by Silver Bow, 
bred to Bon Voyage; Loma B. by Stam B., bred to 
Bon Voyage; Zomitalia by Zombro, bred to Bon 
Voyage; Janet B. by Stam B., bred to Zombro. 

Chas. Middleton's Nina C. by Stoneway, bred to 
Sky Pointer Jr. 

J. H. Williams' mare by Sky Pointer, bred 
to Autumn Boy. 

P. Garnier's Clara by Gossiper, bred to Limonero. 

C. H. Williams' Twenty-Third by Director, bred 
to Star Pointer; Alta Nola by Altamont, bred to 
Searchlight Rex. 

L. A. Denker's Bernie Wilkes by Athol Wilkes, 
bred to Limonero. 

Harry D. Brown's Grace Cole by Nutwood Wilkes, 
bred to Arner. 

J. F. Byrne's Dixie S. by Zolock, bred to Direct 
Heir. 

Ed Roberts' Colton Maid by Maximillian, bred 
to Arrow Stanley; Zolo by Zolock, bred to Arrow 

Stanley. 

J. A. Lane's Vaida by Diablo, bred to Humboldt 
Dillon. 

Fred Kline's Miss Handsome by Stamboul, bred to 
Zolock. 

W. R. Johnson's Maud by Stamboul, bred to 
Greco B. ; Sadie Moor by Grand Moor, bred to Greco 
B.; Banker's Daughter by Arthur Wilkes, bred to 
Greco B. ; Myrtle Kinney by McKinney, bred to 
Sadi Moor; Belle W. by Harry Wilkes, bred to Sadi 
Moor. 



Wm. Manske's Eralut by Tipton Almont, bred to 
Redlac. 

E. S. Train's Belle Fredericks by , bred 

to Steam Beer. 

W. L. Vance's Elisa S. by Alcantara Jr., bred to 
Bon Voyage; ' Mollie McCune by Lynmont, bred to 
Sir John S. 

John Renatti's Madaline S. by Horace S., bred to 
Sir John S. 

W. A. Glasscock's Grey Bess by Sir Richard, bred 

to Zolock; Bay Queen by , bred to 

Murray M. 

S. G. Cousins' Dolly Wheeler by Joe Wheeler, bred 
to R. Ambush. 

R. A. Fuller's Pelee by Zolock, bred to Raymon. 

I. W. Hazelett's Inaugurita by Zolock, bred to 
Redlac. 

Frank B. Long's Lfdy L. by , bred to 

Zolock. 

Valencia Stock Farm's Rose Drop by Sidney, bred 
to R. Ambush. 

A. Morris Fosdick's Athene by Dexter Prince, bred 
to Bon Voyage. 

R. A. Cushman's Daisy McKinney by McKinney, 
bred to Zolock; Trilby Maid by Truman, bred to 
Lynwood W. 

Miss B. Fitzgerald's St. Gertrude by Diablo, bred 
to Palo King; Nellie by Advocate, bred to St. An- 
thony. 

Frank E. Alley's Welladay by Steinway, bred to 
Bon Voyage; Lady Lesmo by Memo, bred to Dia- 
wood; Diavola by Diablo, bred to Zolock. 

Geo. W. Putnam's Tessie Tildon by Bay Wilkes, 
bred to Star Pointer. 

E. M. Conroy's Frances C. by Wasatch, bred to 
Star Pointer. 

L. L. Puderbaugh's Elizabeth S. by Nushagak, bred 
to Zombro. 

W. R. Murphy's Lady Marlow by Red Star, bred 
to Red McK.; Lady Gossiper by Gossiper, bred to 
Red McK. 

J. J. Rupp's Birdie Clay by Bay Bird, bred to 
Red McK. 

C. H. McFeely's Glassy by Arthur Wilkes, bred 
to Bon Voyage. 

E. T. Parker's Naulahka by Nutford, bred to Del 
Coronado. 

Thos. Ryan's Kitty by , bred to Jimmy 

S. 

M. C. Reefer's Advosta by Advertiser, bred to 
Prince Ansel; Annie McKinney by McKinney, bred 
to Jay Bird; Dimentes by Diablo, bred to Zombro. 

C. A. Spencer's The Bloom by Nushagak, bred to 
Zombro. 

J. E. Montgomery's Effie Logan by Durfee, bred 
to Star Pointer. 

Hemet Livery Stables' Lady Woolsey by Woolsey, 
bred to Geo. W. McKinney; Nealy W. by Geo. W. 
McKinney, bred to On Stanley; Lady Zombro by 
Zombro, bred to Geo. W. McKinney; Belle by Con- 
nifer. bred to Geo. W. McKinney. 

California Breeders' Stake — Foals of 1907. 

Chestnut foal by Diablo-Bell by April Fool, Jno. 
Suglian. 

Bay foal by R. Ambush-Dolly Wheeler by Joe 
Wheeler, S. G. Cousins. 

Bay filly by Direcho, F. B. Long. 

Bay colt by Zombro-La Belle by Sidney, Valencia 
Stock Farm. 

Brown colt by Zombro-Puckachee by Dexter Royal, 
Valencia Stock Farm. 

Bay filly by Amado-Rosedrop by Sidney, Valencia 
Stock Farm. 

Brown filly by Amado-Glendower by Mohawk Chief, 
Valencia Stock Farm. 

Black foal by Del Coronado-Bonnie Ailes by Faus- 
tino, J. A. Fairchilds. 

Bay foal by Bon Voyage-The Silver Bell by Silver 
Bow, L. H. Todhunter. 

Brown foal by Bon Voyage-Lomo B. by Stam B., 
L. H. Todhunter. 

Bay foal by Zombro-Florette by Prince of Nor- 
folk, L. H. Todhunter. 

Sorrel foal by Stoneway-Viva by Antevolo, J. A. 
Kirkman. 

Bay colt by Parole, dam Sappho, Mrs. L. J. Hast- 
ings. 

Bay foal by Judge Dillon-Mowitza, Mrs. L. J. 
Hastings. 

Sorrel foal by Stoneway-Susie D. by Diamond 
Denmark. G. W. Kirkman. 

Sorrel foal by Stoneway-Glory, G. W. Kirkman. 

Black foal by Stoneway-Bell Basler by Robt. Bas- 
ler, G. W. Kirkman. 

Black foal by Radium-Lady Stoneway by Stone- 
way, G. W. Kirkman. 

Brown foal by California Guide-Mabel, F. B. 
Stockdale. 

Black foal by Zombro-Jenny by Black Diamond, 
A. H. Belt. 

Bay foal by Zombro-Lady S. by Neernut, J. Walker. 
Brown foal by Direcho-Lassie by Strathway, J. 
Walker. 

Sorrel filly by Lynwood W.-Maud Fowler by An- 
teeo, G. A. Pounder. 

Sorrel foal by Young Hal-Rosie Moore by Sidmore, 
G. A. Pounder. 

Bay foal by Direcho-Lady Madison by James Madi- 
son, F. E. Ward. 

Bay filly by Athadon-Nugget, D. L. Bachant. 

Bay filly by Star Pointer-Effie Logan by Durfee, 
J. C. Montgomery. 

Bay filly by Geo. W. McKinney-Lady Woolsey, 
Hemet Livery Stable. 



Saturday, January 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Bay colt by Geo. W. McKinney-Belle by Connifer, 
Hemet Livery Stable. 

Bay foal by Zombro-Manila by Shadelaud Hero, 
J. H. Torrey. 

Brown filly by Jimmy S. -Kitty, Thos. Ryan. 

Black colt by Del Coronado-Queen Woolsey by 
Woolsey, E. E. Sherwood. 

Sorrel foal by Nutwood Wilkes-Dot McKinney by 
McKinney, W. T. Sesnon. 

Bay foal by Star Pointer-Frances C. by Washsatcb, 
E. M. Conroy. 

Bay colt by Exchange-Thumza by Zolock, H. P. 
Herman. 

Bay colt by Bon Vovage-Welladay bv Steinway, F. 

E. Alley. 

Bay colt by Bon Voyage-Mabel Wynn bv Zombro, 

F. E. Alley. 

Bay colt by Del Coronado-Pineapple by Woolsey, 
W. G. Durfee. 

Bay filly by Del Coronado-Belle Pointer by Sky 
Pointer, W. G. Durfee. 

Bay colt by Del Coronado-Queen Director by Mon- 
tana Director, W. G. Durfee. 

Dunn filly by Del Coronado by Gen. Beverly, W. G. 
Durfee. 

Bay colt by Bon Voyage-Reina del Diablo bv 
Diablo, W. A. Clark Jr. 

Brown colt by Bon Voyage-She by Abbotsford, W. 
A. Clark Jr. 

Bay filly by Highland C.-Patty D. by Ultimus, W. 
A. Clark Jr. 

Brown colt by Bon Vovage-Ruth Mary by Direc- 
tum, W. A. Clark Jr. 

Bay colt by Bon Voyage-Lucy May by Oakland 
Baron, W. A. Clark Jr. 

Sorrel filly by Zolock-Myrtha Whips by Whips, 
W. A. Clark Jr. 

Brown filly by.R. Ambush-Hvtu by Happy Prince, 
J. H. Kelley. 

Sorrel colt by Bolock-Violet by Conn, J. H. Kelley. 

Bay foal by Billy Dunlap-Miss Stone by Stone- 
way, Cornell Bros. 

Brown filly by Prince Ansel-Majella B. by Nush- 
agak, Alex. Brown. 

Bay filly by Prince Ansel-Daisy B. by Waldstein, 
Alex. Brown. 

Chestnut filly by Prince Ansel-Mamie Martin by 
Nushagak, Alex. Brown. 

Bay filly by Nushagak-Kinocha by McKinney, Alex. 
Brown. 

Brown colt by Nushagak-Steina by Steinmont, 
Alex. Brown. 

Black colt by Nushagak-Zamita by Electricity, 
Alex. Brown. 

Brown colt by El Rio Rey-Lottie by San Diego, 
Alex. Brown. 

Bay filly by El Rio Rey-Josie D. by Nutwood Wilkes, 
Alex. Brown. 

Bay colt by El Rio Rey-Bonnie Derby by Chas. 
Derby, Alex. Brown. 

Bay foal by Bon Voyage-La Moscovita by Guy 
Wilkes, W. E. Detels. 

Bay filly by Bon Voyage-Hawthorne by McKin- 
ney, Wm. Garland. 

Sorrel filly by Cresco Wilkes-La Belle Altamont by 
Altamont, I. L. Borden. 

Bay colt by Star Pointer-Trix by Nutwood Wilkes, 
J. W. Marshall. 

Black colt by Zolock-Madeline by Demonio, J. W. 
Marshall. 

Bay filly by Demonio-Lauanna by Waldstein, J. W. 
Marshall. 

Bay filly by Prince Ansel-Ima Jones by Captain 
Jones, E. D. Dudley. 

Bay filly by Wayland W.-Hattie Fowler by Robin, 
S. B. Wright. 

Bay colt by Del Norte-Miladi B. by Chehalis, Thos. 
H. Brents. 

Bay filly by Del Norte-Laurelia by Caution, Thos. 
H. Brents. 

Brown colt by Senator H.-Mattie Norte by Del 
Norte, Thos. H. Brents. 

Sorrel foal by Stoneway-Irene by Iran Alto, O. 

C. Higgins. 

Bay foal by Stoneway-Sister Logan by Gen. 
Logan, O. C. Higgins. 

Bay foal by Star Pointer-Roda Fay by Gen. Logan, 

D. B. Moshier. 

Bay filly by Sonny-Electa by Escort, W. H. Sam- 
son. 

Bay filly by Athasham-Bessie by Yosemite, C. H. 
Warlow. 

Bay colt by Stanford McKinney-Donnatrine by 
Athadon, G. L. Warlow. 

Black colt by Stanford McKinney-Narcola by 
Athadon, G. L. Warlow. 

Brown filly by Athasham-Lustrene by Onward, G. 
L. Warlow. 

Black colt by Stamboulette-Strathalie by Strath- 
way, G. L. Warlow. 

Bay colt by Athasham-Sextette by Athablo, G. L. 
Warlow. 

Bay colt by Athadon-Cora Wickersham by Junio, 

G. L. Warlow. 

Black filly by Direcho-Scrappy Nell, by Pellatier, 
J. W. Snowden. 

Chestnut filly by Steam Beer-Belle Fredericks, E. 
S. Train. 

Brown foal by Zombro-Arabella by Black Pilot, S. 
C. Henderson. 

Gray filly by Almaden-May Belle Blandie by Don 
Marvin, M. L. Lusk. 

Black colt by Strathway-Johanna Treat by Thomas 
Rysdyk, J. C. Wallace. 



Bay filly by Kinney Lou-Electress Wilkes by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, H. H. Helman. 

Brown foal by On Stanley-Colton Maid by Maxiniil- 
lian, E. D. Roberts. 

Canfield Stake — Foals of 1907. 

Chestnut filly by Diablo-Bell by April Fool, Jno. 
Suglian. 

Chestnut filly by Strathway-Bonnie Red by Red 
Wilkes, Thomas Brodnax. 

Bay filly by Geo. W. McKinney-Itala by Honduras, 

C. H. Thomas. 

Brown foal by Adjutant-Connie, R. T. Curtis. 

Brown foal by Ed. McKinney-Mattie B. by Alex. 
Button, A. J. Gillett. 

Chestnut filly by Steam Beer-Belle Fredericks by 
(untraced), E. S. Train. 

Black filly by Direcho-Scrappy Nell by Pellatier, 
J. W. Snowden. 

Bay colt by Stanford McKinney-Donnatrine by 
Athadon, Geo. L. Warlow. 

Black colt by Stanford McKinney-Narcola by 
Athadon, Geo. L. Warlow. 

Brown filly by Athasham-Lustrine by Onward, Geo. 
L. Warlow. 

Bay colt by Athasham-Sextette by Athablo, Geo. L. 
Warlow. 

Black colt by Stamboulette by Strathway, Geo. L. 
Warlow. 

Bay colt by Athadon-Cora Wickersham by Junio, 
Geo. L. Warlow. 

Bay filly by Athasham-Bessie by Yosemite, C. H. 
Warlow. 

Bay foal by Star Pointer-Roda Fay by Gen. Logan, 

D. B. Moshier. 

Bay colt by Star Pointer-Trix by Nutwood Wilkes, 
J. W. Marshall. 

Black colt by Zolock-Madeline by Demonio, J. W. 
Marshall. 

Bay filly by Demonio-Louanna by Waldstein, J. W. 
Marshall. 

Bay foal by Cedric Mac-Concha by A. W. Rich- 
mond, W. C. McCully. 

Bay filly by Bon Voyage-Hawthorne by McKinney, 
Wm. Garland. 

Black filly by Lee Dillon-Brown Bell by Prince 
Almont, J. B. Nightingale. 

Brown colt by Zombro-Athalene by Coeur d'Alene, 
M. B. Mosher. 

Chestnut filly by Walter Barker-Mamie Elizabeth 
by Red Regent, C. A. Canfield. 

Black colt by Walter Barker-Dixie W. by Zolock, 
C. A. Canfield. 

Chestnut filly by Walter Barker-Cleo by Connifer, 
C. A. Canfield. 

Brown filly by Walter Barker-Sue by Athadon, C. 

A. Canfield. 

Bay colt by Iran Alto-Beautiful Bird by Nutwood 
Wilkes, H. S. Hogoboom. 

Brown colt by Bonnie Direct-Wanda II. by McKin- 
ney, F. H. Burke. 

Bay colt by Zolock-Wanda by Eros, F. H. Burke. 

Bay colt by Zolock-Lady Belle Isle by Elmo, F. 
H. Burke. 

Black colt by Nushagak-Advosta by Advertiser, 
M. C. Keefer. 

Dark bay foal by Petigru-Maggie McKinney by Mc- 
Kinney, Curtis C. Colyer. 

Black colt by Del Coronado-Queen Woolsey by 
Woolsey, E. E. Sherwood. 

Brown colt by Mountain Boy-Miss Benton by Ben 
Benton, R. W. Scott. 

Bay filly by Athadon-Nugget by (unknown), D. L. 
Bachant. 

Bay filly by Direcho-Lady Madison by James Madi- 
son, F. E. Ward. 

Bay foal by Bon Voyage-La Moscovita by Guy 
Wilkes, W. E. Detels. 

Sorrel foal by Lynwood W.-Maud Fowler by An- 
teeo, G. A. Pounder. 

Sorrel foal by Young Hal-Rosie O'Moore by Sid- 
more, G. A. Pounder. 

Bay foal by Nutwood Wilkes-Twenty-Third by 
Director, C. H. Williams. 

Dark bay foal by Oosoola-Sallie Miles by Red 
Cloak, T. N. Goldsmith. 

Gray filly by McKena-Ohio by Peveril, Wm. Hen- 
drickson. 

Gray filly by McKena-Maud by Grover Clay, Wm. 
Hendrickson. 

Roan foal by Dalha-Petti McKinney by Geo. W. 
McKinney, C. W. Winter. 

Bay colt by Zombro-La Belle II. by Sidney, Valen- 
cia Stock Farm. 

Brown colt by Zombro-Puckachee by Dexter Royal, 
Valencia Stock Farm. 

Brown foal by Amado-Glendoveer by Sidney, Valen- 
cia Stock Farm. 

Bay filly by Direcho-mare by (untraced), Frank 

B. Long. 

Bay colt by Palite-Lorna Doone by Bayswater 
Wilkes, E. D. Dudley. 

Bay filly by Prince Ansel-Ima Jones by Capt. Jones, 

E. D. Dudley. 

o 

OCCIDENT STAKE HAS 81 ENTRIES. 



The Occident Stake for foals of 1907 to trot in 
1910 closed January 1st with 81 entries, which 1b 
an increase over the lists received for the stakes 
of the past few years as the stake for foals of 
1906 received 77 entries, and those for foals of 
1905 and 1904 received but 66 entries each. Secre- 
tary Filcher writes us that he will send the lists of 
second and third payments made January 1st on 
the stakes of 1909 and 1908 In time for our next 



issue. The list of foals of 1907 entered in the Oc- 
cident to be trotted in 1910, is as follows: 

Thos. H. Brents' b f Princess del Norte by Del 
Ndrte-Laurella. 

Robt. S. Brown's ch c Mendolock by Zolock-Arios. 

Alex. Brown's b f by Prince Ansel-Daisy B.; br 
f by Prince Ansel-Majella B.; b f Nukina by Nush- 
agak-Kinocha; br c Rey Lot by El Rio Rey-Lottie. 

Jacob Brolliar's gr c Kinney B. by Red McK. -Ethel 
Basler. 

Martin Carter's b c by Nutwood Wilkes-Mora Mac. 
J. L. Charlton's ch f Miss Jasper by Dumont S.- 
Nellie J. 

W. A. Clark Jr.'s br c Jean Valjean by Bon Voy- 
age-She; b c Bon Viviant by Bon Voyage-Reina; 
b f Perissa by Highland C.-Patty D. ; s f Nona Whips 
by Zolock-Myrtha Whips; b c Voyageur by Bon 
Voyage-Lucy May. 

Robt. F. Curtis' br f Molly McGinn by Adjutant- 
Connie. 

Wm. E. Detels' b c Bon Guy by Bon Voyage-La 
Moscovita. 

W. G. Durfee's b c by Del Coronado-Pineapple. 
E. D. Dudley's b c Pal by Palite-Lorna Doone. 
1. N. Harlan's b c Prince Alto by Iran Alto-Rita R. 
Mrs. L. J. Hastings' b c Robin Parole by Parole- 
Sappho. 

Wm. Hashagen's ch h Kinney by Kinney Rose- 
Chit iwee; gr s Kinney H. by Kinney Rose-Lola H. 

H. H. Hellman's b m by Kinney Lou-Electress 
Wilkes. 

E. P. Heald's b f by Count Hannibal-Nona Wash- 
ington. 

H. S. Hogoboom's br c Clear Voyage by Bon Voy- 
age-Carrie Malone; b c Fred Raschen by Iran Alto- 
Lady Raschen. 

S. H. Hoy's b c Laverne by Jules Verne-Miss 
Davis. 

J. B. Iverson's s f Salinas Girl by Nutwood Wilkes- 
Ivoneer; b f Amy McK. by Bonnie McK.-Amy I.; 
s f Rose Wilkes by Eugeneer-Roseate. 

M. C. Keefer's blk c Nuvosta by Nushagak-Ad- 
vosta. 

J. H. Kelly's s s by Bolock-Violet; b f by R. 
Ambush-Hyto. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c Roman Boy by Zolock- 
Wanda; b c It by Bonnie Direct-Wanda II.; be Lord 
Isle by Zolock-Lady Belle Isle. 

W. K. Lindsay's blk f Dolly Maden by Almaden- 
Queen. 

M. L. Lusk's gr f Alma Belle by Almaden-May 
Belle Blanche. 

J. W. Marshall's blk c Zoblack by Zolock-Madeline. 

Abe Marks' b m Ethel Marks by Wayland W.-Ce- 
cille M. 

W. S. Maben's ch f by Walter Barker-Mamie Eliza- 
beth. 

W. C. McCully's br s Sylmar by Cedric Mac-Concha. 
W. W. Mendenhall's b g Strathdown by Strathway- 
Elsie Down. 

Edmund Miller's b f Stambonita by Stam Boy- 
Straightness. 

M. D. Mosher's br c Heinie Sneider by Zombro- 
Athalene. 

C. Nanny's b f Ella by Athby-Lucy. 

Ed. S. Parker's b c by Bon Voyage-Missie 
Medium. 

W. C. Parsons' s f by Albert Mac-Bell. 

Henry Peters' br c by Jules Verne-Little Babe. 

G. A. Pounder's s f Lotta Lynwood by Lynwood 
W.-Maud Fowler. 

C. C. Price's b f Miss Price by Zombro-Miss Wil- 
liams. 

Thos. Ryan's br f Miss May Belle by Jimmy S.- 
Kitty. 

F. D. Sexton's b f by T. C.-Squaw. 

L. C. Shell's br c Kid O. by Bonnie McK.-Cayuse 
Mollie. 

Chas. F. Silva's b f by Demonio-Polka Dot; b f 
by Demonio-Queen S. 

N. M. Strong's b f You Tu by R. Ambush-Ajeta. 

Geo. T. Trowbridge's blk f Miss Trowbridge by 
Guy Dillon-Antee Rosa. 

J. H. Torrey's b f Zella by Zombro-Manila. 

L. H. Todhunter's b f by Bon Voyage-The Silver 
Bell; br c by Bon Voyage-Loma B.; b c by Zombro- 
Florette. 

E. S. Train's ch f Brewery Belle by Steam Beer- 
Belle Fredericks. 

Valencia Stock Farm's b c by Zombro-La Belle; 
br c by Zombro-Puckachee; b f by Amado-Rosedrop. 

Geo. L. Waiiow's br c Stanadon by Stanford Mc- 
Kinney-Donatrine; blk c McCola by Stanford Mc- 
Kinney-Narcola; br f Shamtrine by Athasham-Lus- 
trine; b c Sexsham by Athasham-Sextette; blk c 
Strathboule by Stamboulette-Strathalie; b c Dona- 
sham by Athadon-Cora Wickersham. 

C. H. Warlow's b f Ateka by Athasham-Bessie. 

Fred E. Ward's b f Bess J. by Direcho-Lady Madi- 
son; b f Folly by Direcho-un traced. 

C. H. Williams' b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Twenty- 
Third. 

S. B. Wright's b f by Wayland W.-Hattie Fowler. 

F. E. Wright's b f Toots W. by Stam B.-Iadora; 
br f Expedio by Lijero-Mater Expedlo. 

J. Walker's b h by Zombro-Lady S. 
W. W. Yandell's c Jim Johnson by Osito-Black 
Bess. 



Second Payment, Occident Stake, 1909. 

D. L. Bachant's ch f Sadie B. by Athadon-Nugget. 
Geo. T. Beckers' blk c High Pride by McKinney- 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



| ROD, GUN AND KENNEL .\ I 

t f 

t CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT J 



THE CALIFORNIA ANGLERS' ASSOCIATION. 



What the California Anglers' Association, an en- 
thusiastic and representative body of active sports- 
men, has accomplished and the possibilities of future 
work for the general welfare in the propagation and 
protection of game fishes in this State is pleasingly 
apparent in the following excerpts taken from the 
third annual report of the Board of Directors: 

During the short three years that the association 
has been in existence much has been effected in the 
line of better protection and propagation of both 
fresh and salt water game fishes. The club is quasi- 
public in its standing, its aim and scope in all perti- 
nent matters has been carried out on broad lines in 
the endeavor to preserve one of the natural herit- 
ages of man. 

The showing made during the past year in obtain- 
ing good legislation, in defeating bad legislation; in 
stocking near-by Coast streams with fish and in a 
coherent esprit du corps in matters of importance to 
the fraternity, should alone, if for no other reasons, 
appeal strongly to the angling sportsmen and lover 
of out-door life and through a common sentiment of 
interest arouse the desire for affiliation and co-labora- 
tion, both by personal effort and contribution of the 
individual mite for the general good of a worthy 
purpose and cause. 

At Lie last annual meeting, by resolution adopted, 
the Board of Directors selected a committee to urge 
upon the Legislature, then in session, the enactment 
of several needed laws for the better protection of 
trout and striped bass. 

"Your Board is pleased to report that its work along 
the lines of securing good legislation and preventing 
bad legislation at the last session of the Legislature, 
was productive of great good, and such work has 
been of great value towards protecting our game 
fishes, and also of great benefit to all anglers and 
out-door enthusiasts. 

"Many bills affecting game fishes were introduced 
during the session of the Legislature and more or 
less vigorously supported by their authors and ad- 
herents. 

"Notably among the bills were: Senate Bills 113, 
82, 545, 731, 739, 833 and Assembly Bills 386 and 827. 

"Senate Bill 113, that became a law after many 
amendments thereto, was amendatory of many sec- 
tions of the Penal Code, all relating to fish. Its prin- 
cipal feature was an amendment to Section 628A of 
the Penal Code, known as the striped bass law. The 
section of the bill as proposed and advocated by 
many was as follows: 

" 'Section 2— Section 628A of the Penal Code of the 
State of California is hereby amended to read as 
follows: 

" '628A (Striped Bass). Every person who, at any 
time, buys, sells, offers for sale, or has in his pos- 
session for sale, any striped bass of less than five 
pounds in weight, or who, at any time offers for ship- 
ment, ships or receives for shipment or transporta- 
tion from the State of California to any place in 
any other State, Territory or foreign country any 
striped bass of less than five pounds in weight, caught 
or taken in the waters of this State, is guilty of a 
misdemeanor; provided that the possession of such 
striped bass shall be prima facie evidence of the 
fact that such striped bass were caught or taken 
in the waters of this State.' 

"This bill virtually sought to remove all protection 
to the striped bass as anyone can readily under- 
stand from its reading. Nowhere in its provisions 
did it seek to make it unlawful for anyone to take, 
kill, destroy or have in one's possession, a bass 
under five pounds in weight, but simply sought to 
make it unlawful to buy, sell or have in one's pos- 
session for sale. One could take, kill, destroy and 
have in his possession so long as he did not sell 
or offer the same for sale. 

"Your Board is pleased to state that the efforts of 
the association to defeat this measure and retain 
the present law for strijied bass was successful, irre- 
spective of the great fight that was made for its 
passage. In this contest for the preservation of the 
striped bass this organization stood alone and every 
angler for this game fish owes a debt of gratitude 
to the association that successfully fought to re- 
tain the present law. 

"Your Board caused Assembly Bill 829 to be in- 
troduced. This bill in brief sought to place a closed 
season upon striped bass. This measure was not 
pushed on account of a strong opposition and the 
fear that our forces would be weakened in the fight 
against the proposed five-pound bass law. 

"Further, we caused to be introduced Senate Bill 
82 and Assembly Bill 811, which afterward were 
converted into the General Appropriation Bill and 
passed. This was an appropriation of $7,000 with 
which to erect a striped bass hatchery. This was 
in line with what the association proposed doing 
itself, prior to April, 1906. 

"With a part of this appropriation, the State 
Board of Fish Commissioners in May of last year, 
acting with the Federal Bureau of Fisheries, erected 
a small hatchery upon Bouldin Island in the San 
Joaquin River. The first season's take of eggs 



amounted to something over eighteen million. The 
largest number of eggs ever taken in any Eastern 
State was eleven million in a season. It is confi- 
dently expected that this year's take will be from 
fifty million to one hundred million eggs. The 
establishment of the hatchery for the artificial propa- 
gation of the striped bass will insure the future of 
this magnificent game and table fish. 

"This Association has been and is the pioneer 
in the advocacy of the artificial propagation of the 
striped bass, and the great results that have been 
achieved by reason of its untiring zeal and activity, 
justly entitles its position as the foremost organiza- 
tion on the Pacific Coast. 

"The present law making it unlawful to take a 
trout, steelhead trout or salmon less than five inches 
in length was introduced in the Legislature, advo- 
cated by and became enacted at the instance of this 
association. The wisdom and justice of this law is 
recognized by all. 

"Your Board wishes to call the attention of the 
members, and all anglers who frequent the Coast 
streams, to a measure that passed the Legislature 
and became a law irrespective of a strong fight 
made by us against the same. The changing of 
the trout season from April — November to May 1st 
to November 15th was deemed unwise by your Board 
because it would interfere with the angler of our 
Coast streams when fishing was at its best, and 
such change would not be of any greater protection 
to the fish than formerly. The sentiment of up- 
country Legislators being so strong for the change 
and realizing that the change would be made, we 
secured an amendment to the then pending bill in 
and whereby the Coast stream angler is permitted 
to fish for trout during the month of April in tide- 
water. Anglers generally, and especially those 
who fish at Point Reyes, and at other places along 
the tidal waters of erstwhile Coast streams, can and 
should appreciate the work of this association in 
securing this compromise. 

"One of the bills introduced in the Legislature 
was Assembly Bill 386. This measure sought to 
amend the law of trespass. The measure was 
wicked and vicious. By its provisions one who 
should go upon any lands, whether enclosed, culti- 
vated or otherwise where signs were displayed for- 
bidding shooting or fishing, without written permis- 
sion of owners would be deemed guilty of a trespass 
and punished accordingly. We are pleased to say 
that the bill was killed in committee and full credit 
is due this association for its death. 

"This association stood behind the bill appropriat- 
ing $7,500 for the acquisition of a railway car for 
the better distribution of the game fishes in stocking 
the streams and lakes. We approved all the appro- 
priation bills introduced at the instance of the Fish 
Commission and did everything that we could for 
their successful passage. 

"This association at its last annual meeting gave 
expression favoring a license tax of one dollar upon 
those who angle for game fishes, and during the past 
year such sentiments have been taken up and en- 
dorsed by clubs and individuals to such an extent 
that it may well be said that the angling sportsmen 
of California favor such a tav. Your Board is 
thoroughly of the opinion that the next Legislature 
will take the subject up and pass a measure favor- 
ing such a license. The solution of acquiring an 
ample fund with which to propagate and thoroughly 
protect our game fishes will be solved by the license 
tax." 

In the important matter of stocking several 
streams within easy reach of San Francisco the re- 
port states: 

"Great interest has been taken in the propagation, 
planting and protection of game fishes by the angling 
sportsmen during the past year, not only here in Cali- 
fornia, but all over this country. Many of the 
Governors of various States and Territories during 
the past year refer to the absolute necessity of stock- 
ing streams and lakes and keeping such waters 
stocked with game fishes, showing as it does the hold 
that the cause of fish protection has all over the 
United States; and, judging from the reports of the 
various Fish Commissions throughout the country, 
great and good work is being done in this direction. 

"During the past year your Board took up the 
proposition of stocking the Paper Mill Creek in 
Marin county and Sonoma Creek in Sonoma county. 
These streams are notable among the numerous trout 
streams of California, and especially so in the former. 
The nearness of these streams to the center of popu- 
lation, and the nominal cost to an angler to fish 
them, have endeared these two fishing waters to 
the anglers in and about our bay cities. 

"On the 28th of last September your Board planted 
50,000 rainbow trout and 10,000 steelhead trout in 
the Paper Mill and in October following your Board 
planted 35.000 rainbow trout in Sonoma Creek, near 
the town of Glen Ellen. The trout planted ranged 
in size from 1 V4 inches to 3 inches in length, the aver- 
age fish being all of two inches in size. The fish 
were placed in favorite localities and the two plants 
were highly successful as to size of fish, conditions 
of water and environments where planted. In plant- 



ing the fish your Board received the unstinted cour- 
tesies of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad and of 
the members of the State Board of Fish Commis- 
sioners, who all contributed towards making the re- 
stocking of these streams so successful. It will be 
the policy of the Board to continue the good work 
along these lines and keep these and other near-by 
trout streams stocked and re-stocked from time to 
time. Your Board has had an abstract of the fish 
laws of the State printed upon quarter cards and 
caused the same to be distributed in the vicinity 
of fishing waters for the better information of the 
public. 

"Recognizing the necessity of having sportsmen 
anglers commissioned as Deputy State Fish Com- 
missioners in order that the laws might be better 
enforced, your Board made a request to the State 
Board of Fish Commissioners for the appointment of 
twelve deputies from the body of the association. Up 
to this time eight of our members have been commis- 
sioned as deputies, with full power to act, and we 
have the assurances of the appointment of four 
others. Much good work has been accomplished by 
our deputies. They have visited fish stalls and mar- 
ket places and warned the dealers of arrest, with 
an active prosecution in case of any violation of the 
fish laws. These deputies are active sportsmen 
anglers and are all more or less upon the streams 
fishing, and their presence, or the fear of their 
presence, will have a salutary influence upon all 
persons who are inclined to violate the law. 

"It has been the policy of our association from the 
beginning to acquire a library, devoted entirely to 
piscatorial matters. 

"At the time of the fire we had many publica- 
tions, both scientific and otherwise. The library 
had grown from a few volumes to 200 or more and 
much interest was developed by members in the 
same. The destruction by fire of this fine collection 
of volumes was not only a loss to us, but to the 
public as well, as the library had become one of 
general reference. 

"Your Board has undertaken to secure from the 
various departments at Washington reports and 
other matters bearing upon fish life and the fishing 
industry generally, and have already received many 
valuable Government books and State reports, with 
promises of receiving all reports and pamphlets that 
are obtainable from the Government. 

"Contributions of books relating to fishing, hunt- 
ing, outdoor life and natural history are respectfully 
solicited from the members and others, which same 
will be acknowledged by letter and also by placing a 
card of the donor in the book. Photographic views 
of fishing scenes and outdoor life are also solicited, 
these to be kept in permanent form as an attractive 
feature of the club room. Various periodicals and 
magazines are taken and received (sixteen in num- 
ber) by the association, and are always available 
for reference or recreation in the club room." 

A year ago at the annual meeting there was a 
membership of but eighty-six active members out of 
a total of 176 that were enrolled at the time of the 
great fire, April, 1906. Since then twenty-six of the 
old members have been again placed on the active 
roll, making a total of 112 of the old members who 
are now in active standing. 

The present status of membership may be summed 
up briefly as follows: 

Old members 112, old members resigned 9, old 
members dropped 6, total 15. Present roster of old 
members 97. 

New members, since April, 1907, 62; new mem- 
bers deceased, 1; new members resigned, 2; new 
members dropped, 1; total, 4. 

Present list of new members, 58. Honorary mem- 
bers, 3. Total active membership, 158. 

The collector's book, saved from the fire, shows 
that forty-seven additional members have not identi- 
fied themselves with the association since the great 
catastrophe and their present whereabouts are un- 
known. 

The membership of the association is widespread, 
as will be seen here: San Francisco, 116; Alameda 
county, 16; Marin county, 4; Sonoma county, 2; 
San Mateo county,, 4; Solano county, 3; Mendocino, 
Contra Costa, Napa, Plumas, Orange and San Joaquin 
counties, 1 each; State of Nevada, 2; Massachusetts, 
1; Washington, 1. Honorary members: California, 
2; New Jersey, 1 (Hon. Grover Cleveland). 

The financial condition of the association is 
healthy, there being a good cash balance in the 
treasury. There being no indebtedness, save for 
ordinary current expenses. 

The furniture, pictures and all other property in 
the club rooms are owned by the association and are 
fully insured. 

The present club rooms are located at 1771 Geary 
street, on the lower floor, are cozy, comfortable and 
located centrally. It is contemplated to hold month- 
ly "smokers" in the immediate future, thus enabling 
the members to get thoroughly en rapport with each 
other. 

It is probable, however, that later on this spring or 
summer the club will move further "down town" 
to more commodious and suitable quarters. 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January' 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



ANGLING CLUBS ENJOY BANQUET AND SMOKER. 



The California Anglers' Association members and 
guests assembled in the cosy clubrooms on Geary 
street, near Fillmore, Monday evening. January 6th, 
the occasion being the annual meeting, followed by 
a "smoker." There were about 100 jolly fishermen 
in attendance. The evening was enlivened by 
speeches, songs, music and fishing stories. 

Among the speakers were: General George Stone, 
president of the Board of Fish Commissioners; James 
Watt, S. A. Wells, W. J. Street, E. W. Freeman, Chief 
Deputy Charles H. Vogelsang, George A. Went worth 
and others. 

The following directors were elected: H. B. Gos- 
liner, E. M. Pomeroy, George F. Roberts, Dr. Charles 
E. Liethead, W. J. Street, C. R. Overholtzer and Geo. 
A. Wentworth. Eleven applications for membership 
were received and placed on file. The directors were 
to meet last Monday evening and elect officers for 
the ensuing year. 



The San Francisco Striped Bass Club's annual 
meeting and banquet took place on Wednesday even- 
ing, January Sth. The only club member absent was 
an unfortunate fisherman who was ill. The officers 
elected for the ensuing year were: Charles P. 
Landresse, president, Hugh Copeland, vice-preisednt ; 
James S. Turner, secretary, and Charles H. Kewell, 
treasurer. Trophies for record catches last season 
were awarded as follows: First prize, Chris L. 
Johnson, for the largest fish caught, a striped bass 
weighing twenty-five pounds, in San Antone Slough, 
on Christmas day; Mr. Johnson also now wears the 
Ripley high hook medal. Second prize, Emil Acceret; 
third prize, James S. Turner; fourth prize, Charles 
Landresse; fifth prize, Charles Hollywood; sixth 
prize, Joseph Uri; mysterious prize, won by Chris 
Johnson, after tossing up with Joe Uri. 

Among the speakers during the evening were: 
"Billy" Hynes, James Watt, James Lynch, Charles 
Breidenstein, M. J. Geary, J. X. De Witt, H. Cope- 
land. Chris Johnson and others. 

Those present were: James Lynch, James S. Tur- 
ner, James Watt, Charles P. Landresse, Charles H. 
Kewell, Frank Marcus, M. J. Geary, James M. Thom- 
son, Charles Breidenstein, H. Copeland, Josepr Uri, 
W. S. Turner, Nat Mead, Raisch Terry, W. J. Hynes, 
"Billy" Hynes, H. A. Sangster, Chris L. Johnson, 
Henry Franzen, Fred Franzen, Louis F. Armknecht, 
Tim Lynch, J. G. Bliss, Charles B. Hollywood, E. 
Oelzmann, S. F. Murphy, Al Varoazza, George Becker, 
Carl Thomson, Fr. Paulson, Mr. Wallace, Tim Murphy 
and R. Jenisch. 

o 

Cause of the "Involuntary Pull." — As on this subject 
much doubt seems still to exist even in the minds 
of gun manufacturers, it is interesting to have Mr. 
Teasdale-Buckell's account of the matter, as given 
in his recent work, "The Complete Shot." With omis- 
sions necessary to economize space, this is what he 
says: "The accepted view of involuntary pull * * * 
was that after the shot from the first barrel, recoil 
jumped the gun away from the finger, and then the 
shoulder rebounded the gun forward on the stiff 
finger, which, being struck by the trigger, let off 
the second barrel. The author, for some time pre- 
vious to 1902 had become conscious that this explana- 
tion was open to question. However, -it was not 
until he sat down and worked out the times of re- 
coil and finger movement that he felt safe in chal- 
lenging so generally accepted a statement. But this 
calculation proved to him that, so far from rebound 
causing the unwished for 'let off' the latter occurred 
in one-twentieth of the time occupied by recoil back- 
wards." Then follows an account of the experiments 
undertaken to prove the theory, and the writer con- 
tinues: "It was demonstrated that the rebound from 
the shoulder had nothing whatever to do with the 
involuntary pull. The true, and now always accepted 
cause was, as the author had stated it to be, namely, 
that the recoil jumped the trigger away from the 
finger in spite of the muscular contraction that still 
continued after the let-off of the first barrel; that this 
muscular contraction continued to act and again 
caught up the trigger, as soon as the pace of recoil 
was diminished by the added weight of the shoulder, 
and so the finger indicted a heavier blow or pull on 
the trigger than in the first pull off. In the first pull 
it was finger pressure, in the next it was pressure 
acting over distance, and was measurable in foot 
pounds, as work or energy is measured. This proved 
to be the correct solution." 



Registered Tournaments. — We are in receipt of 
explanatory blank form application for registered 
tournaments under the auspices of the Interstate 
Association, which were mailed by Secretary-Manager 
Elmer E. Shaner. 

These forms are complete and models of concise- 
ness and detail. Mr. Shaner states that he has mailed 
some 7,500 of the blanks and an equal number of 
explanatory forms, to gun clubs and individual shoot- 
ers throughout the United States and Canada. He 
will be pleased to send this matter to any person 
making application for the same by addressing 
Elmer E. Shaner, Secretary Interstate Association, 
219 Coltart Square, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Application for sanction must be made not less 
than thirty days in advance of the tournament open- 
ing date. 



A. K. C. AFFAIRS. 



The present status regarding proceedings of the 

A. K. C. (Incorporated) and the opposition to the 
situation as it now stands is outlined below by an 
Eastern correspondent. So far the Ashland House 
Committee seems to have won a point, in that court 
proceedings have been stayed temporarily and it 
looks as if there was a chance for an amicable set- 
tlement. 

The internecine quarrel of the American Kennel 
Club has now spread over the country. Members in 
distant States who hitherto have evinced only a 
passive interest in the strife are now called upon 
to join in tho issue, and the struggle bids fair to 
engage for the next three weeks not only the kennel 
interests, but the attention of the sporting fraternity. 
The contest for supremacy in the American Kennel 
Club is of long standing, and has been marked by 
much bitterness of feeling. 

The trouble was precipitated by a certain element 
in the organization that lias since been known as the 
Ashland House Committee. These members objected 
to the incorporation of the American Kennel Club. 
They contended that when the American Kennel 
Club, unincorporated, transferred its assets to the 
American Kennel Club, Incorporated, in 1906, it 
was represented to the delegates that the policy 
of the old club was to be perpetuated and that there 
was to be no change in the management and methods 
employed to control dog affairs In this country. 

In view of these promises the necessary authority 
to transfer the property was unanimously agreed 
to. Afterward and when a careful examination was 
made, it was stated that the articles of incorpora- 
tion had been so drawn up that it vested unlimited 
power and the control of the entire dog interests in 
America in six men named as incorporators for a 
term of at least three years, and in such a way 
that the control could be indefinitely perpetuated. 

Several attempts to introduce amendments were 
made, all of which failed. The administration in 
reply to the charges denied any attempt to control 
kennel affairs, and asserted that the American Ken- 
nel Club was incorporated for the purpose of pro- 
tecting the dog interests, and that they were actuated 
only by considerations of sportsmanship and the 
welfare of the American Kennel Club. The charges 
that the administration had formed a trust was 
waged unceasingly. 

Failing to secure a majority at the meetings of 
the American Kennel Club to pass amendments to 
the constitution, the Ashland House Committee ob- 
jecting to what they termed "high finance" methods 
began an action in the Supreme Court to prevent 
the American Kennel Club from making further use 
of the assets of the original organization, and asked 
for a receiver for the association, for an injunction 
restraining its officers from paying out its funds, and 
for an accounting. 

Before the case was called for trial Attorneys G. 
H. Taylor, representing the American Kennel Club, 
and R. D. Murray, acting for the Ashland House 
Committee, entered into an agreement which super- 
ceded the court proceedings, by which an arbitration 
committee of thirty members of the club was agreed 
upon to settle all differences. The result of the de- 
cision of these members should be final. According 
to the agreement five members were to be named 
by the officers of the American Kennel Club, five by 
the Ashland House Committee, and twenty to be 
balloted for by mail vote of the clubs all over the 
United States in affiliation with the American Kennel 
Club, unincorporated, or as they existed before No- 
vember 19, 1906, when the alleged invalid acts be- 
gan. 

President August Belmont appointed Marcel Viti, 
Philadelphia; Wm. G. Rockefeller, Howard Willets, 

B. S. Smith, Dwight Moore, New York, as the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club representatives. The selection of 
the Ashland House Committee was F. H. Osgood, 
Boston; Dr. Henry Jarrett, Philadelphia; Dr. J. E. 
De Mund, L. M. D. McGuire and Clair Foster, New 
York. 

The canvass for votes began at once, and the 
following tickets for the remaining twenty commit- 
teemen on the list were nominated: 

American Kennel Club — August Belmont, president 
of the A. K. C.'s present and past; W. B. Emery, 
Boston; Edward Brooks, Medford, Mass.; -C. W. 
Keyes, East Pepperell, Mass.; J. W. Appleton and 
George B, Post Jr., Bernardsville, N. J.; Thomas 
Cadwallader, Philadelphia; Winthrop Rutherford, 
James Fortimer and Goorge Lauder Jr., Greenwich; 
William Ranch and Samuel N. Cutler, Revere, Mass.; 
John G. Hates. J. H. Brookfleld, C. F. Drake and 
Chetwood Smith, Worcester, Mass.; H. K. Blood- 
good, Singleton Van Schaick and H. II. Hunnewell, 
Wellesley, Mass., and W. W. Stettheimer, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Ashland House Committee — J. Sargeant Price, 
Philadelphia; 11. Stewart Kdson, Stamford; William 

C. Codman, Providence; D. Murray Bohlen, Philadel- 
phia; Russell H. Johnson Jr., Boston; Joseph B. 
Thomas Jr., Hartford; Willis N. Kimball, Boston; M. 
Mowbray Palmer, Stamford, Richard II. Hunt, George 
Lauder Jr., William L. Barclay, Henry W. Warner, 
Dr. M. A. Stivers, S. N. Cutler, S. W. Groome Jr., 
Dr. O. H. Albanesius, W. S. Gartner, James Jenkins 
and John F. Collins, New York. 

As the matter now stands, two tellers, with Sec- 
retary Vredenburg, will open the; ballots on January 
22d. The lawyers of the two committees — R. ,D Mur- 
ray for the Ashland House Committee and G. H. 
Taylor for the administration — will also be on hand. 



In the meantime both sides have apiiealed to their 
supporters. In presenting their side of the case, the 
administration supporters in a circular say: 

The administration takes pride in the fact that 
it has made and maintained the enviable record of 
the American Kennel Club, which is due to its 
untiring and unselfish efforts. It has succeeded in 
making the stud book the only one recognized by 
the United States Government for the importation 
of dogs, to the exclusion of the foreign stud books, 
formerly recognized. 

The administration was actuated by considerations 
of sport smanship and the welfare of the American 
Kennel Club. It was deemed expedient not to waste 
$7,500 in legal proceedings and therefore consented 
to an amicable arrangement. 

Much has been said about the power of the Execu- 
tive Committee as constituted at present, but no men- 
tion is made of the fact that the provisions of the 
constitution and by-laws have not been changed one 
iota in this respect since their adoption by the unin- 
corporated club in the year 1890. 

Much has been said about the selection of the 
directors by the incorporators, yet they used their 
best judgment to select a representative board, and 
their subsequent resignation above referred to shows 
that if any mistakes were made in the original selec- 
tion, the error could have been cured last spring if 
the Ashland House Committee had so desired. Can 
any one conceive of a more thoroughly self-consti- 
tuted body than that of the Ashland House Commit- 
tee? 

It is ridiculous to assert that the original directors 
were to remain indefinitely in control. The directors 
passed a resolution to fill vacancies in the board by 
electing those nominated by the delegates at large, 
and three directors were so elected at the last an- 
nual meeting of the club. In one year of the exist- 
ence of the corporation five vacancies took place, 
and it was provided that six directors were to be 
elected by the delegates in February, 1908, and six 
each year thereafter, so there was ample opportunity 
for representation while guaranteeing the continu- 
ance of enough members to assure a prosperous 
policy for the club. Any club whose delegate is a 
director of the American Kennel Club has the power 
to terminate his term of office as director by with- 
drawing his name as delegate or appointing another 
delegate in his place. 

In a list of twenty names all clubs cannot be 
represented, but the administration has confined itself 
to no section, and has selected from all interests, 
headed by Mr. Belmont, the president. His name 
has been left off the other ticket, notwitshtanding 
fully 90 per cent of the dog interests recognize the 
invaluable services he has rendered the American 
Kennel Club for a quarter of a century. In looking 
over the names on the other ticket one is not im- 
pressed with the fact that they have contributed 
largely to the support or success of the American 
Kennel Club. 

The Ashland House Committee in giving out the 
names of their candidates, prepared a history of the 
proceedings in circular form that was sent to each 
member. The official communication in part con- 
tains these amendments: 

When the American Kennel Club transferred all 
of its assets to the present so-called American Ken- 
nel Club, incorporated, November 19, 1906, it was 
represented to the delegates there present that the 
policy of th old club was to be perpetuated and that 
there was to be no change in the management and 
methods employed to control dog affairs in this 
country. 

On these representations the unincorporated club, 
having confidence in its officers, by whom the ar- 
rangement was recommended, authorized the execu- 
tion by them of the papers necessary to effect the 
transfer of all its property. 

Afterward, and when a careful examination was 
made of the constitution, which had been adopted 
by the so-called incorporated club, it was ascertained 
that it had been so artfully drawn by the six men 
who had Incorporated it as to vest unlimited power 
and control of the entire dog interests in America in 
themselves for a period of at least three years in 
such a way that this control could without much 
doubt be indefinitely perpetuated. 

The way in which the incorporators accomplished 
this object was briefly as follows: 

In May, 1901, a committee was appointed to In- 
vestigalc and to report concerning the advisabilltj 
of incorporation. In September. 1901. a short reso- 
lution was smuggled through to amend so as to 
enable the committee not to investigate and report, 
but actually to incorporate the club. 

Nothing was done, and the matter was forgotten, 
dropped, and abandoned by the club. However, in 
1903 a certificate of incorporation was obtained for 
a corporation known as the American Kennel Club. 
The men who Incorporated this new organization 
were August Belmont, A. P. Vredenburg, Marcel A. 
Viti, H. K. Bloodgood, W. G. Rockefeller, W. B. 
Emery, H. H. Hunnewell and G. F. Carnochan. 

Nothing was done with this certificate of Incorpora- 
tion until November 5, 1906, when the incorporators 
held a meeting and adopted a constitution, which 
vested absolute power in an Executive Committee, 
to be selected by a board of thirty directors. These 
directors, instead of being selected by the club, were 
selected by six incorporators. This was an absolute 
reversal of the democratic principles of the club, in 
which all were elected by the members themselves. 

These six incorporators next proceeded to elect Mr. 
Belmont and Mr. Hunnewell president and vlce-presi- 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



dent, to appoint Mr. Vredenburgh as secretary, and 
then to elect, as has been stated, the thirty direc- 
tors. These directors, apparently recognizing that 
"one good turn deserves another," immediately . met 
and proceeded to elect as chairman of the standing 
committee a sufficient number of the of the original 
incorporators to give to them a majority. In other 
words, the Executive Committee now consists of 
Incorporator Belmont, Incorporator Rockefeller, In- 
corporator Hunnewell, Incorporator Viti, Incorporator 
Bloodgood, Incorporator Emery, together with their 
friends Appleton and Brooks. 

o 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The judges for the thirty-second annual dog show 
of the Westminster Kennel Club, to be held at Madi- 
son Square Garden during the week of February 11th, 
have been chosen. Several foreign judges will offi- 
ciate, while experts have been named for all classes. 
Fritz Kirschbaum of Berlin will award the ribbons 
in the classes for Great Danes and Dachshunds; L. 
Farwell of Canada will preside in the ring during 
the exhibition of Cocker Spaniels; Walter S. Glynn 
of London has been selected for Airedale Terriers, 
Fox Terriers, Irish Terriers, Scottish Terriers, Rose- 
neath Terriers and Welsh Terriers, while Charles 
Lyndon of Canada will judge Newfoundlands, Re- 
trivers. Bull Terriers and a number of classes of 
smaller dogs. 

The entry list promises to establish a new rec- 
ord. More entries have been received up to date than 
In any previous year at this time. Entries will close 
with James Mortimer, 801 Townsend Building, 1123 
Broadway, New York City, January 23d. The list 
of judges follows: 

Dr. Henry Jarrett, Philadelphia, Penn. — Blood- 
hounds, Irish Water Spaniels, Clumber Spaniels, 
Field Spaniels, Collies, Old English Sheepdogs, Chow 
Chows and Dalmatians. 

John W. Keevan, Brooklyn, N. Y.— St. Bernards. 

Fritz Kirschbaum, Berlin, Germany — Great Danes 
and Dachshunds. 

Joseph B. Thomas Jr., Simsbury, Conn. — Russian 
Wolfhounds. 

Brig. Gen. R. D. Williams, Lexington, Ky. — Deer- 
Imunds, Greyhounds, American Foxhounds, Bassett 
hounds, Samoyedes and Esquimaux (Mallimuths). 

W. Rutherford, New York City — English Fox- 
hounds. 

B. F. Seltner, Dayton, Ohio — Pointers. 

William Tallman, Brooklyn — All Setters and 
Chesapeake Bay Dogs. 

L. Farewell, Toronto, Ont. — Cocker Spaniels. 

G. Cadwalader. Philadelphia, Pa. — Beagles. 

Charles D. Bernheimer, New York City — Poodles. 

John F. Collins, Brooklyn — Bulldogs. 

Walter S. Glynn, London, England — Airedale Ter- 
riers, Fox Terriers, Irish Terriers, Scotch Terriers, 
Roseneath Terriers and Welsh Terriers. 

Charles Lyndon, Coleman, Ont. — Newfoundlands, 
Retrievers, Bull Terriers, Whippets, Black and Tan 
Terriers, Skye Terriers, Bedlington Terriers, Dandie 
Dinmont Terriers, Schipperkes, Toy Black and Tan 
Terriers and miscellaneous class. 

William Lennox, New York City — French Bulldogs. 

Thomas Benson, Boston, Mass. — Boston Terriers. 

E. M. Oldham, New York City — Pomeranians, Eng- 
lish Toy Spaniels, Japanese Spaniels, Pekinese 
Spaniels, Pugs, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese Terriers, 
Griffons Bruxellois, Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas, Papil- 
lons and Italian Greyhounds. 



Some of the best Collies of the Glen Tana Kennels 
will be shipped to the bench show, to be held at Los 
Angeles on February 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st. 

The reputation of the Glen Tana Kennels for breed- 
ing good Collies is spreading far and wide. An 
evidence of this has just been received by T. S. 
Griffith, the owner of the Spokane Kennels, in an 
order for a pair of extra fine Collie pups to go to 
Conception Del Oro, Mexico. Mr. Griffith is especi- 
ally pleased with this order, as it shows the wide 
reputation being gained by the Spokane dogs. 



The California Cocker Club at a recent meeting 
decided to follow the precedent established by 
Eastern specialty clubs and have endorsed the fol- 
lowing gentlemen as the official judges for the club 
for this year: Phil M. Wand, W. E. Chute, Mrs. 
W. C. Ralston, J. Hervey Jones and Alex. Wolfen. 



The Kennel Editor has received from time to 
time inquiries for books on ' training dogs for the 
hunting field." We can recall no better work than 
"Training the Hunting Dog for the Field and for 
Field Trials," by B. Waters. The articles on "Can- 
ine Education," which appeared in these columns 
several weeks ago, were taken from this standard 
work. The perusal of the articles will easily con- 
vince any of our readers as to the value and au- 
thority of the work itself. The price, bound in 
cloth, is $1.50, and can be had by forwarding this 
amount to Forest and Stream Publishing Co., 346 
Broadway, N. Y. 



Entries for the Los Angeles show close February 
8th. 



All communications to the Southwestern Kennel 
Club should be addressed to J. H. Pearman, Secre- 
tary and Superintedent of the show, 2423 "Budlong 
avenue, Los Angeles, until February 1st, and to 
553 South Spring street after February 1st. 



PATROL LAUNCH FOR SACRAMENTO. 



George Neal, Game Warden of Sacramento county, 
has received a thirty-foot gasoline launch from the 
State Fish Commission in which to more conveni- 
ently patrol the territory over which his jurisdic- 
tion lies. 

Neale has been exacting the boat for several 
weeks, says the Sacramento Bee, but it did not ar- 
rive until a few days ago. He has set to work fit- 
ting it up to suit himself with careful regard to all 
possible comforts and conveniences He will erect a 
canvas shelter for it for night use and under this 
shelter will have an improvised bed. There is also 
room in the launch for provisions and a gasoline 
stove which can be used for both cooking and heat- 
ing purposes. 

The boat was given Warden Neale in recognition 
of the good work that he has done in both game and 
fish matters. His recent work is saving over a 
million black bass from land-locked lakes of this 
county and turning them over to the Commission 
for distribution in places where black bass were 
strangers has, in the opinion of the Commission, 
merited a favor at its hands and so he was pro- 
vided with the launch. 

The new boat will be of great service to Neale. 
especially in apprehending the many violators of 
the fishing laws. The fishermen who are carrying 
on the illegal practice of catching black bass in nets 
in endless numbers are becoming bolder each day 
as they are not molested in their work. They are 
mostly Italians, but their methods of evading capture 
are most unique. With a speedy launch to make 
a sweep upon the fishermen before they have a 
chance to escape, Warden Neale believes he can 
add to the good work he has done along this line. 
With a launch he can keep a better watch of the 
waters of the district and can greatly expedite his 
travels. 

The new boat has been named "The Audubon," 
and it will be ready for launching in a day or so. 

The last official notice that has been received in 
regard to the shipment of Bohemian pheasants that 
are to be introduced into this State by the Com- 
mission was to the effect that they are now on the 
way. Warden Neale has completed all arrangements 
for the care of the hundred pair that are to be allot- 
ted to Sacramento county. 

A launch will also be placed in Russian river, so 
that the deputies can keep down the work of the 
net men, between Duncans and the river's mouth. 



The mid-week duck hunting, particularly on the 
Suisun marshes was exceedingly poor. The birds 
had left for the overflowed lands and green fields. 
Geese were, however, present in flocks of thousands. 



On the 12th inst. many limit bags were secured on 
the Suisun marshes. Members of the Volante, 
Family, Teal, Marsh and other gun clubs returned 
with plenty of fine conditioned ducks. On some 
ponds the shooters took things easy and selected 
their birds. 



Ducks are reported to be loafing on Soap Lake, 
near Gilroy, by the thousands. 



Twelve members of the Empire Gun Club all se- 
cured limits last Sunday on the Elkhorn Slough 
ponds. 



A report from Sacramento duck shooting resorts 

states: 

The best news for the duck hunters these days 
is the coming of the big toothsome canvasback, 
whose arrival from the northern regions has been 
looked for since the first of the year. The big 
birds are not here in force, but are gradually in- 
creasing in number until now almost every powder 
bu rner bags a redhead or so on each excursion to 
the marshes. 

The cans have been a few weeks late in coming 
this year, but if the usual number are present several 
weeks before the season closes the delay will not 
be held against them. A week or so ago there was 
an occasional scattering of canvasbacks and the 
nimrods oftentimes succeeded in securing one or 
two. The strongest proof of their migration is 
found in the strings that are now being obtained. 
The hunters of the Suisun marshes have had some 
very good shoots on canvasback lately and when the 
birds are present around the bay tules they can 
be looked for on higher grounds in a week or so 
afterward. 



The members of the various Los Angeles duck 
clubs that have their preserves along the ocean 
shore south of Santa Monica had the sport of their 
lives Sunday, January 5th, and, with very few ex- 
ceptions, limit bags were the rule. There seemed 
to be countless numbers of teal and spoonies, but 
the sprig and widgeon are becoming scarce. The 
shooting was good all day, and those who did not 
get good bags, either went down late or came back 
early. The ocean was literally black with the birds, 
and yet, strange to say, a few of the clubs reported 
only ordinary luck, which leads some of the hunters 
to believe that the ducks sometimes fly in "streaks." 
The general opinion was that this Sunday was an- 
other good day of one of the best seasons for duck 
that the local hunters have ever enjoyed. 



TRADE NOTES. 



Good Work With Remington Autoloader. 

Lieut. W. C. Jones of Co. I, Eighth Massachusetts 
Infantry, Thanksgiving Day entertained military 
friends at the Indian Hill range with his new Rem- 
ington autoloading rifle, trying out the w.eapon at 
the 200. 300 and 500 yard ranges. The rifle is pri- 
marily a sporting gun and lacks, of course, the mili- 
tary sights which naturally prevented large scores 
in the work, but the working of the gun made en- 
thusiasts during the trials and the scores under the 
conditions were excellent, indicating that once the 
rifle is properly sighted at the target the bullet is 
bound to go where it is intended, true to the mark. 
It is a magazine rifle, and the rapidity with which 
a string can be shot seemed little short of marvel- 
ous. Strings of five shots were fired in from 6 to 10 
seconds. Sergeant Frost of Co. I, in 6 seconds rapid 
fire at the 200-yard range made four hits in five shots. 
Lieut. Jones himself at the 200-yard range scored two 
in 15 seconds, one in 9 and one in 10 seconds. First 
Sergeant Chas. J. Jeffries of Co. D spent some time 
in sighting the rifle for the work and finding the 
normal of the gun, and at 200-yard targets made a 
20 out of a possible 25. Corporal Richardson got 17 
in 9 seconds and then reeled off four out of five in 
7 seconds. Major Sprague scored a 19, and so did 
former Private Vella. Lieutenant Colby of Co. D. 
got an 18 at 200 yards. E. E. North, Eugene Ricker, 
Dr. Hitchcock and others interested in rifle work 
made good scores. Lieutenant Jones at the 300-yard 
mark scored a 17 in quick time, and some good work 
was done by others over that range and over the 
500-fard as well. — From Daily Evening Item, Lynn, 
Mass., November 29th. 



E. E. Drake's New-year's card, mailed to thou- 
sands of his Coast sportsmen friends, is a handsome 
half-tone engraving of a flock of "cans" skurrying 
through a snow storm seeking the shelter of a tule 
fringed slough. 



Winchester's Wonderful Year. 

Not since trap shooting was inaugurated have any 
shells in one year made such a great showing as was 
made by Winchester factory loaded shells in 1907. 
The shooting annals of the year are simply saturated 
with Winchester winnings and records — a glorious 
legion of witnesses of the reliable, uniform and 
strong shooting qualities of the red W brand. The 
highest everage for the year's shooting was made by 
Fred Gilbert, who broke 95.8 per cent of the 9,195 
targets he shot at with Winchester factory loaded 
shells. W. R. Crosby, known in the shooting world 
as King William, made the highest average ever 
known for a series of successive tournaments, cover- 
ing 3,300 targets, he breaking 97.18 per cent with 
Winchester factory loaded shells. Crosby also won 
the professional championship for the year. The ama- 
teur championship was won by Hugh Clark with 
Winchester factory loaded shells, so these shells can 
claim both these highly prized honors. The high 
amateur average for the year was made by an Illi- 
nois amateur, who scored 94.5 per cent of the 4,730 
targets he shot at with Winchester factory loaded 
shells. Winchester shells also established a new 
five-man squad record, both for 500 and 1,000 tar- 
gets, at Leesburg, Fla., November 21, 1907, scoring 
496 out of 500 and 980 out of 1,000 targets, scores 
that are really phenomenal. 

Ad. Topperwein's marvelous shooting with Win- 
chester rifles and cartridges has also drawn atten- 
tion to the Winchester product. Recently, in ten 
days' shooting, he missed only 9 out of 72,500 tar- 
gets shot at, the targets consisting of 2^4-inch wooden 
blocks thrown into the air by an assistant at 20 feet 
distance before a large crowd of people in San An- 
tonio, Texas. Such a performance, which seems 
almost incredible, shows the perfection to which Win- 
chester goods, the red W brand, have been brought. 
The year 1908 opens up with much promise for this 
sterling brand, for if past records are any criterion, 
it would seem safe to predict that the number of 
users of Winchester goods would be greatly aug- 
mented during the present year. 



A Change Contemplated. 

For the past sixty days days Dame rumor has been 
busy on the street intimating that the Selby Smelt- 
ing & Lead Co. contemplate making some change 
with their shell loading plant, and we have just 
learned that Mr. Dick Reed severed his connection 
with the company on the 31st of December, which 
certainly gives considerable color to these persistent 
rumors. In letting Fr. Reed go it is quite evident 
and also a good forerunner that developments will 
shortly materialize. Mr. Reed has been employed 
by the Selby Company for a number of years, and 
has been a prominent factor in every tournament on 
the Coast since 1902, when he made his debut as a 
professional. He has demonstrated his value as an 
ammunition representative on many occasions, and 
as he is one of the best shots on the Coast, a good 
fellow, a friend of everybody, and being exception- 
ally well posted and thoroughly conversant on the 
subject of guns and ammunition, we feel that the 
Selby Company no doubt would be loath to lose 
him, but for this contemplated change. Possibly 
this will be a surprise to our many readers, as it was 
to us, and we are sure you will join us in wishing 
"Dick" much success in any new venture he may 
take up with. 



Saturday, January 18, 1908. J 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



(Continued From Page 7.) 

Whisper; b or br f Miss Zom B. by Zombro-Lady Van 
Nuys. 

Elizabeth G. Bonfilio's b c Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wi Ikes-Atherine. 

W. O. Bowers' b c Zack by Silver Bee-Sadie Ben- 
ton. 

H. Brace's b f Carry G. by Greco-Sadie Moor. 
Alex. Brown's br f Curlew by Nushagak-Nut flower; 
gr c Ansela by Prince Ansel-Serpolo. 

E. O. Binge's b f Princess Flora B. by Stam B.- 
Princess. 

Martin Carter's br f Ella M. R. by Lord Alwin- 
Excella. 

S. H. Cowell's ch f Zaza by Henry Nutwood-Two 
Minutes. 

Lillie Payton's b c Lovelock by Zolock-Etta Wilkes. 
M. C. Delano's br f by Marvin Wilkes-Bess. 
Geo. H. Fox's b c by Cresceus-Silpan. 

E. A. Gammon's blk f Nita H. by Zolock-Lily S. 
Mrs. T. B. Gibson's b f Virginia Lee by Iran Alto- 
Maggie. 

F. Gommet's b c by Strathway-Rosetta. 

Henry Hahn's ch c Lecket by Lecco-Henrietta. 
Fritz Hahn's b c Goldfield by Chas. Derby-Nellie 
Emoline, 

E. P. Heald's b f by Tom Smith-Lady Marvin; b f 
by Tom Smith-Nona Washington. 

S .H. Hoy's ch f Complete by Polite-Camilla. 

J. B. Iverson's blk c Leccoro by Lecco-Amy I. ; be 
Corona by Coronado-Membrita; br c Delphino by 
Delphi-Anita I. 

A. W. Johnson's b f Alma M. by Murray M.-Jet. 

J. A. Jones' blk f by Capt. McKinney-Daisy Q. Hill. 

La Siesta Ranch's br f Josephine Long by Coro- 
nado-Bessie Wilkes. 

Minnie E. Lewis' br f Lillian by Cruzados-Della 
Norte. 

W. S. Maben's b c Zombro-Mamie Elizabeth. 

R. C. McCormick's br f Cora Madison by Coro- 
nado-Jessie Madison. 

Alf. McLaughlin's b c Tom Fitzgerald by Mc- 
Myrtle-Maggie N. 

J. A. Kirkman's b c Star Boy by Stam Boy- 
Straightness. 

William Morgan's blk c Tracy by Direcho-Grace 
McKinney; br f Cony by Zombro-Connie. 

Chris G. Owens' br f Lou McKinney by Kinney 
Lou-Nancy O. 

E. T. Parker's ch c Prince Locke by Zolock-Nau- 
lahka. 

Dan Perkins' b c Style by Stam B.-Zaza. 

Chas. F. Silva's br c by Coronado-Sister to Eleta; 
b f by biam B. -Swift Bird; b c by Coronado-Queen S. 

Thos. Smith's blk c by Gen. J. B. Frisbie-Reinette. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c by Zombro-The Silver Bell; 
b f by Zombro-Loma B. 

J. H. Torrey's b f Gracie T. by Zombro-Manilla. 

Tuttle Bros.' b c Kena Mc by McKena-Belle Carter. 

F. W. Wadham's b or br f Zulu Belle by Petigru- 
Johannah Treat. 

Geo. L. Warlow's blk c Pavana by Stanford McKin- 
ney-Strathalie; ch c Silente by Stanford McKinney- 
Sextette; b c Ranstrau by Athadon-Bessie. 

J. Y. Wheeler's b f by Marvin Wilkes-Stella. 

C. W. Whitehead's b f Delphi-Mina B. 

C. H. William's br f by Unimak-Alta Nola. 

J. W. Marshall's blk f by Nutwood Wilkes-Twenty- 
Third. 

Chas. W. Winters' b c Alarich by Direcho-Patti Mc- 
Kinney. 

S. B. Wright's b c Lynwood Patchen by Lynwood 
W.-Maud Patchen. 

J. W. Zibbell's b c Eddie G. by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 

Third Payment Occident Stake 1908. 

W. O. Bowers' ch f Betty Direct by I. Direct-Betsey 

B. 

Alex. Brown's br c Nusado by Nushagak-Addie B; 
b c Anjella by Prince Ansel-Bonny Derby. 

W. G Durfee's b c by Coronado-Lulu Wilkes. 

C. A. Durfee's blk c Dr. Lecco by Lecco-Bessie D. 

V. K. Dunne's b f Debutante by Kinney Lou- 
Athene. 

E. A. Gammon's b f Cleo Dillon, by Sidney Dillon- 
Cleo G. 

Mrs. L. J. H Hsating's br c California Boy by Co- 
ronado-Lady Gossiper. 

C. Z. Hebert's br c Delphi-Altoonite. 

Rudolf Jordan, Jr., b c El Pronto by Stam B- 
Constancia. 

Geo. W. Kelley's br c Bonkin by Bonnie McK- 
Vantrim . 

La Siesta Ranch's b c Siesta by Iran Alto-Wanda. 
Lou Mativa's b c Jules by Jules Verne-Sophia. 
W. S. Maben's blk c Admiral Toga by Petrina- 
Dixie W. 

H. W. Meek's b or br c by Kinney Lou-Cricket. 
R. C. McCormick's b f Impetuoso by Petigru-Jessie 
Madison. 

E. D. Roberts' b c Arrow Stanley by On Stanley- 
Emaline. 

Chas. F. Silva's b c by Stam B-Swift Bird. 
J. H. Torrey's br f Bessie T by Zombro-Manilla. 
R. P. Wilson's blk c Benton Boul by Peter J-Little 
Dot. 

J. W Zibbell's b f Katalina by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 



PACIFIC BREEDERS' FUTURITY NO. 6. 



Fifth Payment of $10 Each Made on 135 Two-Year- 
Olds, January 2d. 



There are 135 two-year-olds originally named in 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes No. 6, that are 
still eligible to start in the stake, fifth payment hav- 
ing been made on them January 2d. These are foals 
of 1906. A goodly number of them are already 
in training, and while the majority will not be raced 
until they are three-year-olds, there will be fair 
fields in the two-year-old divisions at the Breeders' 
meeting this year. The list of those on which pay- 
ments were made follows: 

Thos. H. Brents' ch f Edgarelia by Edgar Boy, dam 
Laurella by Caution; ch c by Caution, dam Saffrons 
by Antelope. 

I. L. Borden's foal by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Alice 
Bell by Washington; foal by Prince Robert, dam 
Allie Cresco by Cresco; ch c by Prince Robert, dam 
La Belle Altamont by Altamont. 

John B. Benedict's b f by Hanibletonian Wilkes, 
dam Ida May by Grosvenor. 

Jas. L. Bullock's s f Grace H. by Hambletonian 
Wilkes, dam Sally B. by General McClellan. 

W. L. Bolton's gr c George Vodden by General J. 
B. Frisbie, dam Dolly. 

W. O. Bowers' Zack by Silver Bee, dam Sadie 
Benton by Tom Benton. 

Geo. T. Beckers' b f Miss Zoma B. by Zombro, dam 
Lady Van Nuys by Stam B.; b c by Zombro, dam 
Topsy; blk c High Pride by McKenna, dam Whisper 
by Almont Lightning. 

D. L. Bachant's ch f Sadie B. by Athadon, dam 
Nugget. 

Jacob Brolliar's br f Zonelita by Zolock, dam Stone- 
lita by Stoneway. 

0. F. Berquette's br c by Stoneway, dam Daisy 
by Brown's Patchen. 

1. E. Bular's br f Zoriene by Zolock, dam Cor- 
riene by Red Cloak. 

A. Butz's br c A. B. Hal by Hal B., dam Maud 
by Silkwood. 

T. W. Barstow's b c by Nearest McKinney, dam 
Just It by Nearest. 

Alex. Brown's br f by Nushagak, dam Nutflower by 
Nutwood Wilkes; ch f by Prince Ansel, dam Serpola 
by Mendocino. 

E. K. Brown's s f by Demonio, dam May Norris 
by Norris. 

Mrs. L. G. Bonfilio's b c Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Atherine by Patron. 

Lewis Charlton's b c by Dumont S., dam Rose 
Thorne by Hawthorne. 

Martin Carter's b f Ella M. R. by Lord Alwin, dam 
Excella by Monbells. 

S. Christenson's blk f by Strathway, dam Marguer- 
ite K. by Don Pedro; ch f by Strathway, dam 
Simone by Simmons. 

H. Cox's foal by Wayland W., dam Babe by De- 
signer. 

W. A. Clark Jr.'s b f by Highland C, dam Lucie 
May by Oakland Baron; blk f by Highland C, dam 
She by Abottsford; blk c by Highland C, dam 
Ruth Mary by Directum; blk c by Highland C, dam 
Bay Leaf by Telephone; b f by Highland C, dam 
Patty D. by Ultimus. 

S. H. Cowell's s f Zaza by Henry Nutwood, dam 
Two Minutes by Wildnut. 

C. A. Canfield's b c by Zombro, dam Mamie Eliza- 
beth by Red Regent. 

E. D. Dudley's ch c by Palite, dam Bee Sterling 
by Sterling; ch c bv Palite, dam Babe by Dawn- 
lisht. 

J. P. Dunn's b f by Petigru, dam Nora Mac by 
McKinney. 

W. G. Durfee's br f Zulu Belle by Petigru, dam 
Johanna Treat by Thos. Rysdyk. 

F. N. Folsom's s f Lavene by Lynwood W., dam 
Diamonica by Diawood. 

Miss Alice Frazier's b c Joker by Murray M., dam 
Nienah by Nutford. 

Geo. Fox's b c by Cresceus, dam Silpan by Silver 
Bow. 

J. A. Garver's foal by Robert Basler, dam Lady 
Way by Stoneway. 

E. S. Gammon's blk f Neta H. by Zolock, dam Lily 
S. by Direct. 

F. Gommet's b c by Strathway, dam Rosata by 
McKinney. 

T. B. Gibson's b f Virginia Lee by Iran Alto, dam 
Maggie by Soudan. 

W. H. Hoy's s f Complete by Palite, dam Camilla 
by Bays water Wilkes. 

G. K. Hostetter's foal by Robert Direct, dam Lou 
Lively by Boodle. 

Wm. Hendrickson's blk f by McKena, dam Ohio 
by Peveril; b f by McKena, dam Maud by Grover 
Clay. 

Henry Hahn's ch c Lecket by Lecco, dam Henri- 
etta by Boodle. 

F. Hahn's b c Goldfield by Chas Derby, dam Nellie 
Emoline by Leo Corbett. 

W. B. Humfreyville's br c by Kinney Lou, dam 
Nellie by Jim Mulvenna. 

C. L. Hollis' s c Stam Hopkins by Stamboulet, 
dam Sis Hopkins by Strathway. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' c Robt. McGregor Parole 
by Parole, dam Sappho by Robt. McGregor. 

E. P. Heald's b f by Count Hannibal, dam Nona Y. 
by Admiral; b f by Tom Smith, dam Nona Washing- 
ton by Geo. Washington; b f by Tom Smith, dam 
Lady Marvin by Don Marvin; b f by Tom Smith, 
dam Princess McKinney by McKinney. 



C. L. Jones' Carlrea by Carlokin, dam Lady Rea 
by Iran Alto; Nanalea by Carlokin, dam Walda by 
Waldstein. 

J. B. Iverson's blk c Leccoro by Lecco, dam Amy 
I. by Diablo; b c Corono by Coronado, dam Mem- 
brita by Carr's Mambrino; br c Delphino by Delphi, 
dam Anita I. by Dictatus. 

P. A. Iscnor's b f by Murray M., dam Lillie Mac 
by McKinney. 

J. A. Jones' blk f by Capt. McKinney, dam Daisy 
Q. Hill by Altamont. 

Joost Bros.' blk c Bon way by Bonnie Direct, dam 
Presumption by Stein way. 

Fred Jasper's br c by Wayland W., dam Nellie J. 
by St. Patrick. 

E. C. Keyt's blk c by Red Seal, dam Mildred by 
Coeur d'Alene; b f by Red Seal, dam Mai Mont by 
Malcolm. 

J. H. Kelly's foal by Bolock, dam Sister P. by 
Conn; foal by Bolock, dam Latoce C. by Conn; foal 
by R. Ambush, dam Betsy C. by Conn; foal by R. 
Ambush, dam Senovid C. by Conn. 

Geo. W. Kirkman's blk c by Stoneway, dam Ida 
Basler by Robt. Basler; b c Stoneman by Stoneway, 
dam Ethel Basler by Robt. Basler. 

F. W. Kimble's blk f by Kinney Lou, dam Princess 
Leola by Leonel. 

J. D. Kalar's foal by Delphi, dam Duplicate by 
Chas. Derby. 

J. A. Kirkman's b c Star Boy by Stam Boy, darn 
Straightness by Chas. Derby. 

F. J. Kilpat rick's ch g Four Stockings by Kinney 
Lou, dam Electress Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Paul M. Knauf's b c Paul M. by Murray M., dam 
Docy Doe by Blackwood Mambrino. 

Miss M. E. Lewis' foal by Cruzados, dam Delia 
Norte by Del Norte; foal by Cruzados, dam Mollie 
L. by Carbon. 

La Siesta Ranch's br f or b.k Josephine Long by 
Coronado, dam Bessie Wilkes by Aptos. 

.1. Elmo Montgomery's b c Jim Logan by Chas. 
Derby, dam Effie Logan by Durfee. 

A. McLaughlin's b c Tom Fitzgerald by McMyrtle, 
dam Maggie N. by Gossiper. 

L. H. Mcintosh's b f by Arner, dam Kitty by 
Arthur Wilkes. 

L. "Morris' b f Nancy M. by Hambletonian Wilkes, 
dam Lily I. by Iris. 

Ray Mead's f by Monbello, dam Carrie B. by 
Alex. Button. 

Geo. H. McCann's foal by Palo King, dam Fidelity 
by Falrose. 

Wm. Morgan's blk c Tracy by Direcho, dam Grace 
McK. by McKinney; b f Cony by Zombro, dam Con- 
nie by Conner. 

W. W. Mendenhall's Strathdon by Strathway, dam 
Elsie Downs by Boodlg. 

Felix McCabe's s c by Stoneway, dam Bessie 
Hubbard by Hubbard Jr. 

J. W. Marshall's blk f Twenty-Three Skidoo by 
Nutwood Wilkes, dam Twenty-Third by Director. 

C. S. Neal's b c by Zolock, dam Fanny Gossip by 
Gossiper. 

T. W. Orme's b f Mira by Izalco, dam Ziska by 

Zolock. 

F. P. Ogden's s c by Palo King, dam Diawalda by 
Diablo. 

C. G. Owen's br f Lou McKinney by Kinney Lou, 
dam Nancy O. by Clay S. 

K. O'Grady s blk f by Highland C, dam Nellie 
White by Hart Boswell. 

E. T. Parker's s c Prince Lock by Zolock, dam 
Natilahka by Nutford. 

Miss Lillie Payton's b c Lovelock by Zolock, dam 
Etta Wilkes by Billy Sayers. 

Dana Perkins' foal by Stam B., dam Zaza by Bay 
Bird; foal by Stam B., dam Princess by Tom Benton. 

A. G. Pryor's br c Cassie G. by Greco B., dam 
Lizzie S. by Antevolo. 

Jasper Paulson's foal by McKena, dam Laura Dil- 
lon by Sidney Dillon; foal by Milbrae, dam Helen 
Caroline by Campaign. 

Z. T. Rucker's foal by Bonnie McK., dam Diamond 
Bell by Gray Wood. 

John Renatti's s f by Sir John S., dam Madeline. 

Geo. Ramage's b f by Lecco, dam Clara Oakley 
by Sidney Dillon. 

Henry Smith's s c by Demonio, dam Sister by 
Nutwood Wilkes. 

John Suglian's b c King Kohlan by Kohlan King, 
dam Clytie by Magister. 

Jas. Stewart's foal by Diablo, dam Donnagene by 
Athadon. 

E. A. Swaby's b f Grace S. by Nushagak, dam 
Antie by Antevolo. 

Chas. F. Silva's foal by Zolock, dam Polka Dot by 
Mendocino; foal by Stam B., dam Swift Bird by Wald- 
stein; foal by Coronado, dam Queen S. by Sable 
Wilkes. 

Henry Struve's b f by Welcome, dam Hagar 
Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Thos. Smith's blk c by General J. B. Frisbie, dam 
Reinette by Dexter Prince. 

Chas. Saddler's b f Zoe by Zombro, dam Leah by 
Secretary. 

L. H. Todhunter's foal by Zombro, dam The Silver 
Bell by Silver Bow; foal by Zombro, dam Lomo 
B. by Stam B. 

J. H. Torrey's b f Gracie T. by Zombro, dam 
Manila by Shadeland Hero. 

J. L. Vignes' foal by Zombro, dam Cleopatra V. by 
Regallo. 

M. M. Vincent's rn c by Expressive Mac, dam 
Carmon by News Boy. 

Geo. L. Warlow's foal by Stanford McKinney, dam 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



Strathalie by Strathway; foal by Stanford McKinney, 
dam Sextette by Athablo. 

Chester H. Warlow's b c Rautstrau by Athadon, 

dam Bessie. 

Chas. Whitehead's foal by Delphi, dam Nina B. 
by Electioneer. 

Warren Ranch's s f Lady Warren by Senator L., 
dam Countess Knight by Knight. 

C. H. Williams' foal by Unimak, dam Alta Nola 
by Altamont; foal by Unimak, dam Royal Net by 
Royal Sid. 

P .J. Williams' blk c The Major by Monterey, dam 
Leap Year by Tempest. 

S. B. Wright's b c by Lynwood W., dam Maud 
Patchen by Idaho Patchen. 

S. B. Wright's b c by Monocrat, dam Alta Rena 
by Atto Rex. 

J. W. Zibbell's b c Eddie G. by Tom Smith, dam 
Kate Lumry by Shadeland Onward. 

o 

LONG LIVED HORSES. 

Many stories are told of the extreme age to which 
horses have lived, but not all are authentic. Harry 
Wilkes 2:13%, the fastest of the get of Geo. Wilkes, 
and who made his record at the old Fair Grounds in 
Sacramento, Cal., in April, 1887, the spring he was 
eleven years old, is still living and was exhibited 
at a parade in the steets of Somerville, New Jersey, 
where he is still owned, on the 10th of last October. 
The old fellow made a brave showing hitched to a 
cart, and came in for quite an ovation. He was 
foaled in 1876, consequently is thirty-two years old 
this spring. He was gelded when a four-year-old, but 
is the sire of one standard trotter, has two producing 
sons and four producing daughters. His son, Billy 
Wilkes 2:29%, is the sire of four 2:10 pacers. Nathan 
Straus 2:03%. the fastest of the get of Director 2:17, 
is out of a daughter of Billy Wilkes. 

According to a German journal Dr. Norner-Barens- 
burg of that country has been collecting information 
as to the limit age of horses and finds that thirty 
years for equines is about the equivalent of "three 
score and ten" in the human family. It is a good 
old age for horses, but some reach . it and a few 
surpass it. 

The oldest horse of which he could learn any 
definite facts was a roan mare bred in the Govern- 



ment Stock Farm in Hungary, and she was at least 
forty-five years old when she died. In 1852 she was 
assigned to Lieutenant Theodore von Leyss of Lem- 
burg, serving in the Fifth Regiment of Uhlans. In 
the next year horse and rider were transferred to 
the Twelfth Regiment, and in 1859 they made the 
entire Italian campaign together. At the battle of 
Magenta the Lieutenant was cut off from his regi- 
ment by a body of French troops. His brave mare 
carried him to safety by an extraordinary leap over 
a stone wall. 

In 1863 Von Leyss got into financial difficulties 
and in the following year he was obliged to part 
with his mare to a comrade who used her as a road 
horse until 1865, when she passed into the stable 
of a Major of Infantry. With him it is believed 
she made the campaign of 1866. Then Von Leyss, 
who furnished the facts to Dr. Norner-Barensburg, 
lost sight of her until 1873, when he found her, alas, 
serving as a cab horse in Vienna. He kept his eye 
on her after that and in 1882 she had sunk to draw- 
ing a delivery wagon for a manufacturer of paper 
boxes. Von Leyss by this time was in better circum- 
stances and he bought back his old friend and com- 
rade to take care of her until her death. This took 
place in 1892, when she was fully forty-five years 
old, according to the stock farm record. Down to 
the end she was employed daily at light work. She 
was a well set up animal with unusually clean-cut, 
graceful build and limbs. Two days before her 
death she refused feed for the first time in her life. 
Her skeleton is now set up in the veterinary college 
in Vienna. The great age she reached is all the 
more remarkable when her military experiences, in- 
cluding the hardships of two campaigns, are con- 
sidered. Her biographer considers her career as 
establishing the advantage of allowing horses to be- 
come fully matured before they are put to work. 
No horse set to work while green, he thinks, could 
possibly have gone through so much and lived to 
such an age. 

-o 

CODERO 2:0934 GOES TO EUROPE. 



The latest 2:10 trotting stallion to go to Europe 
is the roan horse Codero by Bingen 2:06%, who 
trotted to his record as a four-year-old the past 



season. He was purchased from R. B. Williams, of 
Boston, by John Splan, the latter presumably acting 
for Astrian parties. 

Codero was foaled in 1903, having been bred by 
the late J. Malcolm Forbes. Sired by Bingen 2:06%. 
his dam is Jolly Bird 2:15% by Jay Bird, so that his 
roan color can readily be traced to his maternal an- 
cestor. Codero was sold with the other Forbes 
horses at the dispersal sale at the Boston auction 
in the spring of 1904, being bought by Bither and 
Palmer, Boston trainers for $400. As a two-year-old 
he showed a mile in 2:21% and was again consigned 
to the Boston sale, this time in May 1906, when as a 
three-year-old he trotted a mile in 30% seconds, 
Lon McDounald, acting for Ralph Williams, being 
the high bidder at $5,000. Being entered in about 
all of the futurities, Codero was prepared for these 
engagements but unfortunately trained off, being 
declared out of his futurity engagements and being 
started but once. At Syracuse he was a starter in 
the $1,200 class event for three-year-olds. The Abbe 
winning the opening heat in 2:14%, Codero second, 
while Daffodill took the next two in 2:13% and 
2:13%, Codero finishing second and third. That fall 
Codero trotted a mile right at 2:10 in his work. 

The past season, 1907, found Codero well staked, 
his first start being at the Detroit meeting, where he 
finished sixth in the summary in a field of thirteen 
starters. At Cleveland he got third money to Carlo 
and Margaret O., while at Buffalo he was again third, 
being headed by Sarah Hamlin and Za Za. He was 
next shipped direct to Readville where he won the 
2:19 trot, taking a record of 2:10%. He took a bad 
cold shipping to Providence, being unplaced in his 
first start, later in the week getting second money 
to Dr. Ives. His next start was at Indianapolis, 
where he took down second money in a stake won 
by May Earl. In the $2,000 stake over the Lima, O., 
half-mile track he was again obliged to be contented 
with second money, Claty Latus being the winner. 
At Lexington he won the first heat in the West 
stake reducing his record to 2:09%, Margaret O. 
taking the next three heats. 

Codero is a fine looking stallion, grey roan in color, 
of splendid conformation and with another year 
added to his age he should prove a high-class trotter 
over the Austrian tracks. — American Sportsman. 



I THE FARM 1 

THE STANDARD FOR EVERY 
FLOCK. 

How far different the flock of the 
average farmer and even breeder is 
from what it may be and ought to be 
is too plainly in evidence. The refer- 
ence here, in the first place, to lack 
of uniformity; in the second, to lack 
of outstanding development; and in 
the third, to lack of high all-round ex- 
cellence. The average flock is usually 
characterized by a wide variation, so 
wide as to betray an absence of clear- 
ly defined views on the part of the 
owner, as to what the type of the 
flock should be, and of persistent effort 
to secure fixedness of type. 

It would perhaps be correct to say 
that absolute uniformity is unattain- 
able in a flock, howsoever small that 
flock may be. It is one of the curious 
things about development, that of the 
millions in the human family, no two 
are so nearly alike that points of dif- 
ference may not be found to indicate 
distinct and defined individuality. It 
is even more remarkable that of the 
millions of leaves that clothe the for- 
est trees, no two leaves can be found 
so nearly alike that the microscope in 
skilled hands is unable to find some 
distinctions between them. It shows 
the marvelous power that inheres in 
nature to differentiate, notwithstand- 
ing that each race and tribe in the hu- 
man family has invariably enough of 
racial or tribal resemblance to clearly 
indicate the tribe or race to which it 
belongs, and every leaf of every tree 
has enough of resemblance to every 
other leaf on the tree to indicate un- 
mistakably the species to which it be- 
longs. Family resemblances are even 
closer than racial or tribal resem- 
blances, and yet family resemblances 
are never so close as to render it im- 
possible on the part of the accurate 
observer to distinguish the individu- 
ality. This illustrates why it is that 
the individuality of the members of 
any flock, however skillfully bred, can 
never become so close as to render it 
impossible for the capable shepherd in 
charge to distinguish between the indi- 
viduals that compose the same, and 
yet the resemblance may be made so 
close that there will be but little dif- 
ference in the average weight of all 



the animals in the flock, but little dif- 
ference in the general form, in the 
wool and the production of the same, 
in the fleshing properties and in all 
important essentials of individuality 
concerned in constituting material val- 
ues. To state the matter concretely, 
notwithstanding the difference in the 
animals of a flock which constitute a 
groundwork for identification, the re- 
semblance may be made so close that 
it may be and is frequently compared 
to the resemblance of peas in the same 
pod. It is that kind of uniformity 
which it ought to be the ambition of 
every flockmaster to attain to. How 
shall he attain to it? I answer, 
through careful and skillful breeding, 
through close selection and through 
judicious feeding. 

He must select his males wth refer- 
ence to a type. He ought to be rigid 
in such selection, and when found pre- 
potent, he ought to use them to the 
greatest extent possible. If such males 
are line bred, they are more likely to 
be prepotent than when much mixed 
in family blood lines. The reasons for 
this will be clear to all who have 
given much attention to the laws that 
govern breeding. Animals that are off 
type must be eliminated though indi- 
vidually good, as just in proportion as 
such specimens are tolerated, just in 
that proportion will uniformity in type 
be hindered. Good keep must accom- 
pany the work at every step, as it is 
only through a liberal support that 
uniformity of a desirable character can 
be secured. Uniformity in undesirable 
development would clearly be unfor- 
tunate, a great deal worse than lack 
of uniformity in animals of higher 
average merit. 

Along with uniformity, outstanding 
vigor should be sought. Disease in 
various forms, and chiefly in those 
parasitical in their nature, is becom- 
ing a real menace to sheep husbandry 
in America. Continued well-doing in a 
young animal is a strong guaranty that 
it is not affected by those parasites 
and this is a recommendation as to 
why it should be retained for breed- 
ing. Especially should the evidences 
of such vigor be sought for in males, 
that they may transmit the same to 
their progeny. While the sheep should 
be protected from positively injurious 
exposure, such as draughts, cold rains 
?nd strong and cold winds, the aim 
should be to keep them as much as 
possible in the open air, and to give 
them as much freedom of exercise 
winter and summer as it may be pos- 



sible to secure for them. By manag- 
ing thus, the stamina of very many 
flocks could be raised to a much 
higher plane than it now rests on. 

By carefully eliminating everything 
that is undesirable for breeding uses, 
a uniformly high standard must event- 
ually be reached. The only animals in 
the flock that could possess inferiority 
would be found among the lambs, and 
where such a line of breeding is fol- 
lowed, as has been described, the pro- 
portion of these would be very small, 
in fact it would not exist at all were 
it not for the existence of that law 
of variation to some extent continually 
operative, and yet more or less circum- 
scribed by careful breeding. The 
limit to which such improvement in 
breeding may be carried is the limit 
of the breeder's skill and the limita- 
tions that are set by the attendant 
conditions such as pertain to food pro- 
duction, shelter and the inherent pos- 
sibilities of increase pertaining to the 
breed. It would seem correct to say 
that the limit of improvement has 
never yet been reached in the devel- 
opment of any breed even in the most 
skillful hands. If that is true, how 
great is the gap at the present time 
between average attainment and pos- 
sible attainment in the improvement 
of the flocks of this country! — Prof. 
Thomas Shaw, in Rural World. 

o 

SETTING THE PRICE ON STOCK. 



I have been keeping posted on the 
markets of livestock since the recent 
stringency of the money market and 
have noticed that while the packer 
buyers have succeeded in hammering 
down prices, yet they have not ma- 
terially reduced the cost of the dressed 
meats to consumers and also that they 
stand in urgent need of a certain 
amount of livestock regularly. Even 
though money is close, they are will- 
ing to bid up on what is offered when 
the offerings are light as I am pleased 
to see them to be lately. This suggests 
something to stockraisers. It tells us 
in no uncertain language that they 
will give us something if we demand, 
will give us something for our stock 
if we demand. 

But we know by past experience 
that if buyers get us on the markets 
with heavy consignments they will be 
in a position to get our stock at what- 
ever they care to name in the way of 
price and we cannot help ourselves. 
This also suggests something: It 
points clearly to us that if we did not 



let them have our stock at their price, 
that they would be compelled to give 
us ours, and farther and better, that 
if we followed the tactics of the wool 
producer that we could get Mr. Packer 
out on the range, where we could deal 
with him on an equal footing, with no 
railroad, yardage or feed bills to ham- 
per and compel us to sell at his price, 
regardless of whatever we were mak- 
ing or losing money. 

If stockmen would set the price on 
their stock and would not sell below 
that figure, and would ship nothing 
until the price of his stock was de- 
posited in his home 1 ank, it would not 
l<e two v/eeks until Mr. Packer would 
be out 011 the ranch asking the price 
of cattle, hogs, etc. Not only this, but 
if there was something on that ranch 
which Mr. Packer did not want, he 
could say so. Fewer canners and culls 
would go to slaughter and we would 
have more improvements on our 
ranches and all this, too, without in- 
jury to the consumer. Let us ask how 
many days the packing company's 
plant would run after consignments 
of livestock ceased to come in? Could 
not the grower have his royal highness 
— the packer — down on his knees ask- 
ing for cattle and hogs if he only 
would neglect to ship them to him? 

Is it not the same with everything 
fanners have? If they would de- 
termine what it costs them to produce 
a crop or an animal and positively 
refused to sell it until they would re- 
alize something on it, we would be 
better paid and better satisfied. How 
many farmers would ask from $4 to 
$10 per cwt. for onions, even though 
he knew them to be scarce? I have 
known commission houses and mer- 
chants to ask such a price. Of course, 
some of us are compelled to sell a 
thing as soon as produced at best ob- 
tainable prices and to all such would 
be extended a better market if those 
who could would only hold off. — R. 
M. Wetzbarger. 

o 

CARE OF MILK. 



As soon as the milk is drawn it 
should be taken from the stable and 
strained. A milk room in the barn 
may be partitioned off from the cattle 
with tight walls and, if the barn is 
poorly ventilated and at times foul, 
the door to this room should open 
from the outside to avoid stable odors 
and dust. Milk that is strained and 
allowed to stand in the stable any 
length of time is often nearly unfit 



Saturday, January 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



for use because of the bad odors it 
has taken up. If a room remote from 
the cows cannot be provided, the 
straining may be done out of doors, 
care being taken lest rain and dirt 
enter the can. This trouble can be 
largely averted by covering the can 
between strainings with a clean, 
moist cloth. 

Under the best of conditions, some 
dirt will get into the milk, and the 
strainer is always a very important 
utensil and will remove a great deal 
of this dirt if well cleaned and pro- 
vided with a fine wire gauze and two 
or three thicknesses of cheese cloth. 
The strainer and cheese cloths should 
be well cleaned after every milking. 
This should be done by first rinsing 
with cold water, second by washing 
with warm water to which some 
washing compound has been added, 
and scalding. All dairy utensils 
should be cleaned in this manner 
and, when possible, should be thor- 
oughly steamed. 

As soon as the milking is finished, 
the cans should be placed in cold 
water, the milk stirred occasionally 
for a few minutes and the covers left 
on until the milk is thoroughly cooled, 
precautions being taken that no dirt 
gets into the milk. In order to hasten 
the cooling process, it may be neces- 
sary to change the water surrounding 
the cans occasionally. During the 
greater part of the year in the irri- 
gated sections of the country the milk 
cans may be placed in ditches near 
the buildings. Warm and cold milk 
should never be mixed. They should 
be kept separate, until thoroughly 
cooled or heated and ready to run 
through the separator. Milk should 
not be frozen. 

Milk should be separated in pure 
air and as soon after it is drawn as 
possible. When thus separated there 
is no heating required and the skim 
milk is of greater value than when 
thoroughly cooled and re-heated be- 
fore being fed to the calves, but the 
fresher it is the better. The separator 
should not be placed near the cattle 
where the atmosphere is dusty and 
foul, but preferably in a sepajrate 
building reasonably remote. 

The separator, like the other dairy 
utensils, should be cleaned after 
every using as previously described; 
first, by rinsing all parts with cold 
or tepid water, then by washing the 
different parts with warm water, using 
some kind of an efficient washing com- 
pound in the water; third, by rinsing 
again, and lastly, by thoroughly scald- 
ing or steaming the parts. Flushing 
the bowl until the water runs from it 
clear is not sufficient cleaning, and 
when this is the practice only evil 
results can be expected. The separ- 
ator should be well washed every 
time it is used. A brush is better 
than a clean cloth for washing utensils 
as all corners and seams can be 
reached by it. — Colman's Rural 
World. 

o 

TOO MUCH HAY CAUSES HEAVES. 



Heaves is a disease much too com- 
mon and my observation has led me 
to the conclusion that a larger per- 
centage of farm horses suffer from 
this malady than in the towns and 
cities of our country, and the reason 
for this is, in my opinion, due to the 
fast that a large number of our farm- 
ers feed too much hay. 

No horse requires more than one 
full feed of hay once in the twenty- 
four hours. When farm horses are 
working every day they are subject 
to just this condition, because they 
have not time either at their morning 
or noon meal to eat too much hay, 
but in winter they often stand all day 
with hay before them all the time. 

A horse, to be in perfect health, 
should have the stomach emptied of 
the previous meal for two or three 
hours before he is given another. If 
such is not the case, digestion will not 
take place in a perfect manner, and 
disease is likely to result. There is 
a remarkable sympathy between the 
stomach and the lungs, because of 
the fact that the same nerve trunk 
supplies nerve force to both organs. 
When the stomach is deranged from 
improper feeding the lungs are liable 
and heaves often result. Care should 
also be taken that a horse should be 
fed no dusty or musty hay. This dust 
is as light as air, and the horse in 
breathing draws it right into the lung 



tissue with every breath, and this sub- 
stance, being an irritant, is very prone 
to develop the heaves. If no better 
hay can be obtained the dust should 
be laid by sprinkling with water, when 
the horse will not breathe it, but it 
will be swallowed with this feed and 
probably do him no harm; but when 
at all possible only bright, clean hay, 
free from dust, should be fed to 
horses. Again no horse is in fit con- 
dition for active exercise with a 
stomach distended with hay, because 
the stomach, situated as it is right 
behind the lung space, if full bulges 
forward into the chest to such an ex- 
tent that the lungs have no room to 
properly expand, and can not perform 
their functions properly and anything 
that interferes with the function of 
the lungs predisposes to heaves. In 
many cases if farmers would feed 
one-third less hay to idle horses in 
the winter months they would come 
out in the spring in better condition, 
and we would have fewer cases of 
heaves in the country than we have 
at present— H. G. Reed, V. S. 
o 

DAIRY DOTS. 



Dairymen should not neglect to put 
in a piece of corn for extra feed when 
the fall pastures become short. It 
will pay. 

A bull is about as dangerous a pet 
as a grizzly bear, and the man who 
handles one without a nose stick is 
risking his life every time he does it. 

Even if a farmer cannot afford a 
pure-bred herd of cows he can afford 
a pure-bred bull, and in time, with the 
right selection he can have a good 
herd. 

To use brine for salting butter is 
not feasible except when very light 
salting is wanted. It takes the salt 
itself to make good, marketable but- 
ter. 

How can we expect an underfed 
cow to produce a full supply of milk? 
Might as well expect to put 100 bush- 
els of corn through the sheller and 
expect 110 bushels from the spout, 
to say nothing of the cobs. 

There are but few farmers who can- 
not keep ten cows on their farms. 
The time spent in caring for them 
and the products comes in the even- 
ing and morning, when the farmer 
cannot work in the field. 

A cement milk tank is the latest 
use to which cement has been put. 
It can be built in one corner of the 
cellar or milk house. The water will 
remain cool much longer in it than 
in the old-fashioned wood tank and 
it will be impossible for germs to 
hide in the pores. 

The good milch cows are not the 
ones carrying a large amount of flesh. 
They cannot produce milk and flesh 
at the same time. But they need good 
feed just the same. A cow is a fac- 
tory where the raw material in the 
shape of hay and grain is taken in 
and converted into milk. Farmers 
should see that there is plenty of raw 
material supplied to keep the factory 
running. 

Down on a Southern plantation the 
dairy boys were accustomed to do the 
milking squatting down in a primitive 
fashion until the owner introduced 
milking stools with other improve- 
ments. The boy who first sallied forth 
with the stool returned bruised and 
battered and with an empty pail. "I 
done my best, sah," he exclaimed. 
"Dat blamed cow she won't sit on it!" 

The State of Maryland is doing 
good work In spreading hygenic know- 
ledge by means of a "milk special" 
train. This railroad train has one 
car, which is used as an auditorium, 
in which farmers in the vicinity where 
the train stops are invited to attend 
a thirty-minute lecture, with demon- 
strations on the production of clean 
milk. Two speaker* occupy fifteen 
minutes each at all stopping places. 
o 

A polished knitting needle dipped 
into a vessel of milk and immediately 
withdrawn in an upright position, will 
tell you whether your milkman is hon- 
est or not. If the milk is pure, a drop 
of fluid will hang to the needle; but 
the addition of even a small portion 
of water will prevent adhesion of the 
drop. 



Dairy farming is considered one of 
the most profitable branches of hus- 
bandry. It takes less fertility out of 
the soil than grain farming and fur- 
nishes the largest amount of ferti- 
lizer. The by-products can be used 
in many profitable ways and increase 
the farmer's income. 

o 

An Illinois farmer is keeping ninety 
cows on 225 acres of land and ship- 
ping his milk to Chicago. The gross 
receipts per cow in 190G averaged $108 
and his land paid him an income of 
$35 per . acre. Dairying beats corn 
husbandry and more farmers could 
profit by it. 



■ 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure lor 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HUMAN It EM KI> V fnr Rhn- 
nuitlsm, .Spruins, Sore Throat, et*., it 
is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Cnuatlr Balaam sold Is 
Warranted to pive satisfaction. Price 
per bottle Sold by dru(rirists> or sent by r ■ 
press, charges paid, with full directions for j: * 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, tebtllllu- 
nials, eic. Address 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, 0! ■ 




Management of 



Palace Hotel Co. 

A Guarantee of Excellence 



The only large hotel commanding 
a view of our incomparable bay. 
The best located hotel In the 
world, as it is the most convenient 
to the business centers, while its 
elevation affords wholesome ad- 
vantages in the way of pure a r, 
"sunshine and the absence of all 
annoyances connected with the 
rebuilding of a great city. 

■:• EUROPEAN PLAN ■:■ 

Rates, single: $2.50, $3, $4, $5, 

$6, $7, $8. 
Suites: $10, $12, $14, $16, $18, $20 
EVERY ROOM WITH BATH. 

Music a feature at Dinner and 
in the Foyer, evenings, 
Address 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



PAST FACER FOB SALE. 

Seymow M. 2:23 by Dlawood, dam 
Nancy H. by Upstart. Brown horse, 
six years old, absolutely sound and 
good mannered. Stands 15V4 hands 
high, weighs close to 1100 pounds. Was 
timed separately a mile at Ploasanton 
In the 2:20 pace in 2:12, heat won bv 
[nferlotta In 2:M%. He has been a 
half mllo In 1:03% to Miller cart and 
quarters in 30 seconds. For price and 
further particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davisville, Cal. 



TWO FACING STALLION COLTS 
WANTED. 

A yearling or two-year-old by Star 
Pointer and one by Zombro. Must be 
good color, natural pacers, standard 
bred and registered, or eligible to regis- 
tration. Bay or brown, little or no 
white, of good size, neat heads, not too 
high on leg. standing and traveling 
square on their feel. Must have 
plenty of knee and hock action. Must 
be absolutely sound and out of good 
mares. Address giving price, pedigree 
and full particulars as to spiel, if 
worked, etc., F. W. XELLEY, Breeder 
and Sportsman, 616 Golden Oate Ave., 
San Francisco. 



Racing ! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Race Track 

OPENING DAY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 

Races Commence at 1:40 P. M., Sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 
20 minutes until 1:40 P. M. No 
smoking in the last two cars, which 
are reserved for ladies and their 
escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 



A number of good mares, geldings, 
colts and fillies by such sires as McICln- 
ney. Searchlight. Decco, James Madison, 
Daedalion. Morengo King and Bonnie 
McKlnney. Good Individuals, all kind 
and gentle. For further information 
and to see the horses apply to 
H. BUSING, 
Race Track, Alameda, Cal. 



STAM B. FILLY FOR SALE. 

A coming three-year-old, entered and 
paid up on In Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
and Stanford Stakes, sired by Stam B. 
2:HVi, dam Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%; 
second dam Flora H.. dam of Thomp- 
son 2:14i4, and Bonetti (trial 2:14%); 
third and fourth dams by producing 
sires. Is now in Henry Helman's string 
at Pleasanton, where she can be seen. 
Trotted a mile in 2:50 as a two-year-old. 
An excellent prospect. For further par- 
ticulars address HENRY HAHN, 2125 
Buena Vista Ave., Alameda. 



TWO TROTTERS FOR SALE. 



Sorrel Gelding, five years, by I.. W, 
Russell, dam Diva, dam of Helen Keyes, 
by Piedmont 2 : 1 7 V4 - This horse Is good 
size, sound, a first-class business horse 
and is considered a good speed prospect. 

Black Filly, four years old, by l>ic- 
tatus Medium, dam by Bay Rum 2:16%. 
Sound, and a safe and pleasant driver. 
Will be fast if trained. Price for either 
of the above horses $200. R. consani, 
N. E. Cor. Grove and Laguna Sts., San 
F; an Cisco. 



W. HI G GIN BOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office With E. Stewart & Co., 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Datea. 



JERSEYS, HODSTEINS AND DUR- 
HAM S — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs. 
Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Nlles 
& Co.. Dos Angeles. Cal 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS "-CJU I NTO 
HERD — 77 premiums. California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families fnr sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 
Mateo 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers In FAFER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Blake. Moffltt & Towne. Dos Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



Combination horse, five years old. 
Shows all gaits under saddle, single- 
foots three-minute gait, trots square to 
buggy, very showy, trick horse. Hady 
can drive or ride. Swellcst riding horse 
on the Coast. Sound, and can be 
taught anything. Suite 11 to 14, 2011 
Mariposa St., Fresno, Cal. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



Weighs 1,000 pounds. Is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 

S. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa Cal. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 



WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 
1155 Golden Gate Ave, 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 
SAN rRANCISCO, CAE. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 

—In— 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing-. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 



RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof. Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BOTTESTHLL, RICHARDSON It CO., 
473-485 Sixth St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

PETER SAXE * SON. 51S S2d street 
Oakland. Cal., Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers (or past thirty vears. All vaun- 
ties Cattle. Horses. Sheep. Hogs. High 
class breeding stock Correspondence so 
Melted. 

COLLIE AND BLOODHOUND PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. 



Best bred Young Stock on the Coast. 
Sires and Dams winners on the Bench 
and Workers in the Field. Address 
T. S. GRIFFITH, 
Glen Tana Collie Kennels, 
Spokane, Wash. 

FOR SALE— SETTER PUPS. 

Pedigreed English Setter Pups, two 
months old. Address 

M. PERRY, 
454 West Santa Clara St., San Jose. 



TheyLicKltfk 

As they want it 

COMPRESSED 

PURE-SALT BRICKS 
|* PATENT FEEDERS. 

fThe sane, economical, handy 
I way of salting animals. 
k Asft Dealers. 
jkWr#/e us for Booh. 
Belmont 5me$uppiy(0 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS' BRO0KJ.YN,N.Y 



STALLION FOR LEASE. 



Not wishing to train him this year, I 
will lease to a responsible party on 
liberal terms, for the stud season of 
1908, a five-year-old stallion by Sidney 
Dillon (sire of Don Dillon 1 ::">*>/>>. dam 
Ladywell 2:li;>/2 (dam of Loral 2:19V£). 
by Electioneer; second dam Lady 
Lowell. <lam of two in list, by Sehultz's 
St. Clair. This young horse Is a solid 
built fellow, well made all over, and 
will weigli about 1,000 pounds. Should 
sire speed from all sorts of mares. For 
further particulars address JOE CUI- 
CELLO, Pleasanton, Cal. 



THICK, SWOLLEN GLANDS 

that make a home Wheeze, 
bare Thick Wlml, or Choke- 
£»wu, cau be removed w ith 



yyjSORBINI 



or any Bunch or Swelling 
caused by strain or lnllain- 
DiatUm. No blister, no 
hair Bone, ami hoi ra kc pt 
at work. BUM per l.ottlc, de- 
overert. Hook 3<: free. 

ABSOltlUNK, JR.. for mi 
e'-ered. Cures (Joltre, 'I unx ; 
hydrocele. Varicocele, liook fre 

W. F. YOUNG, P 

54 Monmouth St. Springfield, Mats. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. ; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Ltrauu Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Wbosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 




CAPSULES 

A/ZD"* 



N 



v ^\T^ Repistcred Trade Mark ^ 

SPAVIN CURE 




ITS SUCCESS IS PERPETUAL. 

Every day fastens a new series of 
greatness to its crowded record of 
achievements. On abandonee cripples, 
on desperate cases, on pronounced in- 
curables, on the young and on the old. 
for incipient and chronic lameness it 
is put to extreme tests and scores a 
new and lasting triumph. 



THE CITIZENS' BANK 
Of 

Atchinson County. 

Rock Port, Mo. 

I have bought several bottles of 
"SAVK-T HE- HORSE" through Mr. C. 
H. Widiner. but as he has sold out, will 
order direct. 

I used part of last bottle on my bay 
mare that was lame in hind tendon and 
she is doing line, but to make sure, en- 
close draft for $5 for another bottle. 
Have had over thirty-live years' experi- 
ence in drug business and consider it 
the greatest Vet. liniment 1 have ever 
bandied. 

Yours respectfully. 

W. W. HUDGENS. 
Paterson, N. J. 
I used your "SAVE-THE-HORSE" 
according to directions and find lame- 
ness is gone. Also the knee was in 
very bad condition, springing over, 
while now it is normal. Kindly mail 
$1 box of the Ointment and we will 
send money on receipt. 

Yours truly, 
THE J. H. WESTERVELT LUMBER 
CO., F. J. Westervelt, Secretary. 
SAVE-THE-HORSE" is worth its 
weight in gold. No other agency, 
remedy or method can accomplish such 
miraculous and unfailing results. It 
saves time and money. 

MAKES A TENDON LIKE A ROD 
OF STEEL. 

I'rrmuneiitly cures Hone and Bog 
Spavin, Ringbone (except low Ring- 
bone), Curb, Thoroughpin. Splint, Shoe 
Boil. Wind Puff, Injured Tendons and 
all lameness, without scar or loss of 
hair. Horse may work as usual. 

$5.00 Per Bottle, with a written guar- 
antee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make it. Send for 
a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
56 Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 




TOM DILLON 

— Agent for — 

John B. Stetson's Hats 



Orders filled by mail. 

Van Ness Ave. & McAllister St., 
San FranclEco. 



IMPORTED HACKNEY STALLIONS 

At one-half other people's prices. li 
you want bargains write at once to 
R. P. STERICKER. West Orange. N. J 




$10 Due Saturday, February 1st, 1908 

and must be made not later than that date 

On Three- Year-Olds 

IN THE 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 5, $7,000 

For Foals born 1905 — Race to take place 1908 
Three- Year-Old Division Stake Divided 



$3,000 For Three-Year-Old Trotters 
200 For Nominator of .Dam of 

Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot 

when mare was bred. 



$1,000 For Three-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 For Nominator of Dam of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace 
when mare was bred. 



Last Payment Before Starting Payment. Be Sure to Make It. 

Address all communications and remit by check, postal order, 
Wells-Fargo Express, or registered letter to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary. 

President. P. 0. Drawer 447, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Office 366 Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES If. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes. McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 
Best located and healthiest stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster 
jn Land for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park 
roadsters and prepare horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable 
inii nnt have their horses frightened by autos or cars 




TALLION OWNER 



If in need of anything In the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed. Tabulated Padl greeq , Stock Catalogues, Horse l ooks, 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock anil mado from photos. 
Hoof Tails of all kinds for road or track, breeding Hobbles, Stalllou 
Supports, l'regnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : , 



MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO 



1 



WRITE BREEZE. HE'S THE DOCTOR. 

TELL HIM YOUR CARBURETER TROUBLES. 

If your Gas Engine, whether It is in an automobile or boat, does not run to 
suit you GET A TEXT BOOK SENT FREE. 

Agents: 

New York — Breeze Carbureter Co., 101 W. 66th St. Philadelphia — Rittenhouse 
Garage, 214 So. 23d St. Toronto. Ontario. Can. — E. R. McKinlay, 16 
Seaforth Ave. Chicago — Thos. H. McNevin. 70 La Salle St. 
Boston — V. J. Jacobs, 46 Columbus Ave. 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYW H ERE— Bl G THING. 

Our Terms are Right. Our Goods are Right. There's Money In It. 

BREEZE CARBURETER CO., 

280 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 



Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
rt-ho values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers 
for it. Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co., C. P. Kertel, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



HIGH-CLASS CARRIAGE TEAM FOB 
SALE. 



Geldings, solid bay, handsome, per- 
fect match, five and six years old, 16 
bands, weigh 1.200 pounds each. Very 
toppy, rapid walkers and travelers. Fine 
knee and hock action, broken single and 
double), not afraid of cars or automo- 
biales. Gentle disposition, absolutely 
sound, guaranteed without blemish. 

Also two single driving horses, seal 
brown and a bay. Four and five years 
Oldi 15.3 to 16 hands high, weigli 1,100 
and 1 . 1 r> 1 1 pounds. Either one can trot 
a three-minute gait. Very handsome, 
gentle ami sound. All these horses are 
in first-class condition. Appaly to h 
OLSEN. 814 B St., Haywards, Cal. 



Only One "BBOMO QUININE." 

That is LAXATIVE RROMO Ql'INlNE. 
Look for the signature of E. W. GROVE. 
1'sed the world over to Cure a Cold in 
One Day. 25 cents. 

FOB SALE. 

Beautiful black mare, standard bred, 
height 16 hands, age five and a half 
years: fast walker; can trot or pace. 
Has shown as good as 2:35 on three 
weeks' work. For further particulars 
enquire al H. KAYSER, Buss House, 
San Jose, Cal. 

FILES CUBED IN 6 TO 14 DATS. 

PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to 
cure any case of Itching, Blind, Bleed- 
ing or Protruding Piles in 6 to 14 
days or money refunded. 50 cts. 



Saturday, January 18, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



The Highest Average 

FOR THE YEAR OF 1907 
was made by Mr. Fred Gilbert who, of course, used 

DUPONT SMOKELESS 

THE OFFICIAL RECORDS show that during 1907 Mr. Gilbert shot 
at 9,195 targets and broke 8,817 

A Grand Average of 95.89 Per Cent 

ELEVEN of the 16 men who made AN AVERAGE OF 93 
PER CENT or better used 

Dupont Brands 

OF SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

The Highest Amateur Average 

(94.5 PER CENT) 
was made by an Illinois amateur, who also used 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE LONGEST RUN OF THE YEAR 

271 STRAIGHT 

made by J. M. Hawkins with 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE POWDER THAT MAKES AND BREAKS RECORDS 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



Indiana and Ohio 



Paid up Capital $100,000.00 



LIVESTOCK INSURANCE CO. 

Insures HORSES, MULES and CATTLE Against Death From Any Cause 

$100 000 00 Approved Bonds Deposited With the Auditor of State 
* ' of Indiana for the Protection of all Policy Holders. 

(J. E. VAN CAMP, State Agent.) 

For Application. Blanks and Information Address 

ARTHUR WOLF & CO., Resident Managers, 
521 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 
SMITH DOURSON & CO., City Agents. 



General Watts 2:09Vi, World's Champion three-year-old 
stallion by 



"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:15y 2 

And winner of American Horse Breeder Futurity. It pays to. 
book to such a sire. 

when writing _ kindly The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

mention tins joiirn il f J > ' 



\lsrii He Worth Saying?, 

i '-^ Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good ■ 

horse gust because he "goes lame, throws a 
* curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs, Splints, 
WIndpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

OUINN'S 

, " OINTMENT. 

Dr. K. it. Davenport, a prominent phynlrlan of Khcrldan . 1 nd. , 
Tltes: 1 bive u>ed & number of remedlm for the removnl of 
-» i-iii 1 1 ~ , annul*, thickened tendons and lliwiin generally but for 
the last two years 1 have not been without Qulrtn's Olntmant. I have te*l<-d It thor- 
oughly at different tinir-n, o-rt cay without h<-<lliinry lh it It IS the only nllnhlc rctne- 

ertrlod.'' Price • 1 .00 per bottle. S .1 by all d. ukuIkI* or , 

W. B Eddy & Co., Whitehall N.Y.""' 



i dy of the kliifl 1 h 
,JL Wrlt«> 
n-mlni-uii*.! 




Kinney Lou 2:07 

Reg. No. 37621 

FASTEST TROTTING SON OF THE GREAT Ml KINNEY 



$100 for the Season 



i "ii sli or approved note. 
Usual return privilege. 




Diamond Mac 



Five yours old by Kinnky Lot 2:07}Sj dam by Don Marvin. 
A grand Individual and highly bred young horse. 

cash or approver! note. 
Usual return privilege. 



$30 for the Season 



The above stallions will stand * SANTA CLARA, Cal. 

Best <>f care taken of mares. Pot further particulars addfess 

JSSSf gf: BUDD DOBLE, 15 North 1st St, Sail Jose, Cal. 



BIRDMAN 



HAS THE BLOOD OF CHAMPIONS IN HIS VEINS. 
Sired by Antrim 5918 (sire of Anzell a 2:06%, and dam of Vision 2:09^4). 
First dam Birdie by Jay Bird 5060, sire of Hawthorne 2:06%, Allerton 
2:09%, Early Bird 2:10, Invader 2:10, Gitchie Manitou 2:09% and dams of 
Crescent Route 2:08%., Codero 2:09% and Bessie Drake 2:08%. 

Second dam Lady Lyle by Geo. Wilkes: third dam Dame Tansey, dam of 
two, by Daniel Lambert. 

Will Make the Season of 1908 at Pleasanton. — $50 to Insure. 
Address 

THOS. RONAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Do You Want the Best? 



Breed Your Mares to 



Zombro 2:11 



Son of McKinney 2:11% and Whisper by Almont Lightning. 
Service Fee — $50. 

Zombro holds the Coast record (2: 13) for three-year-old trotting stallions. 
His daughter, Bellemont 2:09%, holds Coast trotting record for three-year-old 
Allies. His son, Hymettus 2:08% holds world's race record for three-year-old 
geldings. Zombro has four in the 2: 10 list, ten in the 2:15 list and seven- 
teen in the 2:20 list. He has won more first prizes in the show ring than any 
other stallion in California, among them the gold medal at the great Port- 
land Fair — over eighteen competitors. His colts always sell for big prices. 
Address 

GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3949 South Figueroa Street, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

STALLION FOLDERS 

Stallion Cards and Posters 

COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know AND WE WILL DO THE REST. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures made 
from Photographs. 

Stallion Service Books $1.00. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
Pacific Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIC 
IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



* WW, 'S 

IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



FOR 

HARNESS * SHOULDER GALLS. BARBED WIRE CUTS.J 
I, CALKS, SCRATCHES AND OTHER Ay 
"j/p AILMENTS OF THE SKIN. ^ 





For GAT,T, BACKS and SHOULDERS. 
('KHI'PUR SORES and SADDLE GALLS 
there la none superior. 

The horse CAN BE,. WORKED AS 
USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE-'CUTS. CALKS. 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES. 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN It has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blrjod 
Poisoning. We placed It on the market 
relying wholly on Its merit for success. 
The sales of 190G were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales [of 
Gall Remedy preceding that year. Tills 
Increase ivas entirely due to Its MERITS, 
and It is THE OALL REMEDY OF THE 
JOth CENTURV. 

It Is quirk and sure for those trnubje- 
Mnme skin cracks under the fetlock 
which Injure and often lay iy> r^ce 
horses. 

Guaranteed under the Food and Drug's 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 12V>. 



All Trainers Should Keep it in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00 
(Head our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper)' 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois 
Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask th.9m 
to write any Jobber for it. 



[Saturday, January 18, 1908. 





Reming ton. 

AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



NO SLIDE TO WORK 

with the left hand. Right hand pulls trigger. Recoil ejects, 
pocks and reloads. Solid breech protection against "blow backs." 
Safety just before trigger finger prevents accidental discharge. 
Full line of double guns if you prefer. 

The Ideal Duck Gun. List Price $40 and Upwards. 

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, llion, N. Y. 
Agency 315 Broadway, New York City. 




A RECORD THAT IS A RECORD 

Adolph Topperwein makes Straight runs of 14,540, 13,599, 13,292 and 13,219 on 2y 4 -inch 
wooden blocks at 20 foot rise, and misses only 4 out of 50,000 and 9 out of 72,500, shooting 

WINCHESTER 

SMOKELESS POWDER CARTRIDGES AND .22 CALIBER RIFLES 

Just to show that all things ARE POSSIBLE with Winchester .22 Caliber Cartridges and 
Rifles, and also to prove "Who's Who" in making rifle records IN PUBLIC, Mr. Topper- 
wein recently shot for ten consecutive days at San Antonio, Texas, and made the above 
world's records for wing shooting with a rifle. He used only two rifles and loaded them 
himself. These record-breaking, history-making scores were made, without the aid of a 
notary public, before large crowds of people in a public park — not in a far-away back lot 
or down on the farm behind the barn. 



RED 



W 



RECORDS 



ARE 



ALWAYS 



RELIABLE 



Don't Buy a Parker 



If Price is the First Consideration. A cheap Mini 
is not only a poor bargain, but a dangerous one. 
The name PARKER stands for excellence in gun 
construction. When you own a PARKER, you 
own the Best. 

Built by the oldest gun manufacturers in America. 
Write for Catalogue. 

PARKER BROS. 



N. Y. SALESROOMS, 
32 Warren Street 



M ERI DEN, CONN. 



BOLT 3 BOLT i. 



BOL! 1 



COIL MAIN SPRING 



nm three mn ? 

Our 1907 New Model Three Bolted Gun embodies all of the requisite 
qualities of a perfect gun — safety, streng'.h, durability, superior shoot- 
ing qualities, beautiful lines, nice balance, and in Bur high grade guns 
very fine finish and richness of ornamentation. See cut *Jo. 7 $300 list 
gun shown above — special price $213.75, ejector $10 extra We guarantee 
the three bolts to hold the gun tight for all time and not allow the gun 
to tly open in discharging. We guarantee the coil main springs forever 
against breaks and miss-fires. 

Send for 1907 Art Catalog describing improvements and special prices 
on eighteen grades $17.75 net to $300 list. 



ITHACA GUN CO., Dept. 15 ITHACA, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Branch: Phil R. Bekeart Co., 717 Market St., San Francisco 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 



$10 Due Saturday, February 1st, 1908 

and must be made not later than that date 

On Three- Year-Olds 

IN THE 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 5, $7,000 

For Foals born 1905 — Race to take place 1908 
Three- Year-Old Division Stake Divided 



$3,000 For Three-Year-Old Trotters 
200 For Nominator of .Dam of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot 
when mare was bred. 



$1,000 For Three-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 For Nominator of Dam of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace 
when mare was bred. 



Last Payment Before Starting Payment. Be Sure to Make It. 

Address all communications and remit by check, postal order, 
Wells-Fargo Express, or registered letter to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary. 

President. P. O. Drawer 447, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Office 366 Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 



SURPLUS $3,200,000 



The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the fire of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in fire and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 

' The ROSS McMAHON j 
Awning and Tent Co. f 



Tents, Hammocks, Awnings and Covers. CampiDg Outfits for Hunting 
and Fishing Trips. 

73 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Temporary 2030. 



McMurray - McMurray 

McMURRAY 

Sulkies and 
Jogging 
Carts 

Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 
prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 




s* 



McMurray - McMurray 



Four more In 2:16 have already been credited this season to 

"McKINNEY" 2:liy 4 

Making his wonderful list still more remarkable. 

So7thi n /joS.The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The Stallion Number 



OF THE 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Will be issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 



If You Own a Stallion 



Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number w ill reach every man on the 
Coast who owns a good marc. 



If You Own a Mare 



You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
tain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, "pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 



If so, you will be interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will be valuable and 
entertaining. 



In place of getting out the usual large Christmas 
□umber of the Breeder and Sportsman last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February 15th was selected 
as Christmas comes too early for an issue of this deserip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wish illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. Write 
for price and particulars. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



S 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET. Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 Pacific Building, 
Comer Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

fintered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Posto/Bce. 



Terms— One Tear IS; Six Months »1.75 ; Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447. San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A BREEDING BUREAU for the State of Cali- 
fornia, something after the plan of the one in New 
York, has been launched by the new California 
Jockey Club, and three stallions have been donated 
to it. According to the ideas and theories of the 
gentlemen who are fostering this enterprise, thor- 
oughbred stallions, placed in different sections of 
the State, and standing for a nominal fee of $10 or 
less, will greatly improve the breeds of California 
horses, and consequently be of vast benefit to the 
farmers and the State. To inaugurate this Breeding 
Bureau, and form a nucleus of stallions that are to 
be provided, the New California Jockey Club, a 
few weeks ago, arranged a race for a purse of $600, 
of which $500 was to go to the winner, said race 
being for stallions only, the owner of the winner to 
donate the horse to the Bureau. Twice was this 
sort of .a race put on the card, but both times it 
failed to fill, and it was tried a third time. After 
much rustling six stallions were found whose 
owners were willing to put them in such a race, 
and on Friday, January 17th, the race was run. 
The stallions were" Mr. Williams' Altanero, Mr. 
Burns' Integrity, Mr. Stovers' St. George, Mr. Ram- 
sey's Judge, Mr Stevens' Tryconnel and Mr. Apple- 
gate's Roscoe. The distance was six furlongs, and 
Mr. Williams' horse Altanero, the lightest weighted 
one in the bunch (all carrying ten pounds below the 
scale) won in 1:17 1-5. The record for this distance 
is 1:11%. The report of the race in the form chart 
stated that Altanero was the strongest ridden horse 
in the race, but he stumbled near the finish. He was 
probably tired from his strong ride. Having won 
the race, he was donated to the New California 
Jockey Club's Breeding Bureau, and Mr. Applegate, 
owner of the stallion Roscoe, that finished last in 
the great event, presented that horse to the Bureau 
also. Col. Dan Burns has since donated his stallion 
Col. Wheeler to the same purpose, and these three 
thoroughbreds now comprise the list of stallions 
that are to "improve" the breed of horses in Cali- 
fornia. While we give the New California Jockey 
Club due credit for inaugurating an enterprise 
which its members, no doubt, think will be of bene- 
fit, to the State, we hope that owners of mares other 
than those of very inferior stock will not be con- 
vinced that a thoroughbred cross is of great value. 
If a farmer owns mares of the draft type, be they 
full bloods or grades, he should breed them to 
stallions of the same type, and if he is the owner of 
trotting bred mares, he should send them to trot- 
ting-bred stallions. At this date, no one should start, 
any breeding venture with scrub mares, and no 
breed but scrubs will be improved by crossing them 
on thoroughbred stallions. The draft, trotting and 
coach breeds are well established, and any person 
possessing mares of either of these breeds should try 
to improve them along the lines of their breeding 
and not attempt improvement by getting away from 
the family to which the mares belong. An Iowa 
farmer recently wrote to thle Chicago Breeders' 
Gazette and asked if it would be advisable to breed 
a trotting mare to a thoroughbred stallion, and this 
was the^reply: 

"Inquirer does not state what he would like to 
breed from this mare. If he wants to get a small 
horse that is very active and probably will be able 
to "run some," but without much prospect of ever 
amounting to much from a market i>oint of view, 
then it will be all right to breed the mare this way. 
We can not imagine, however, that any farmer who 
reads this journal will be guilty of crossing breeds 
without having some definite object in view. We 



should most certainly breed her to a standard-bred 
trotter, choice of sire to be made according to the 
facts in the case presently unknown to us. The 
progeny of a Thoroughbred stallion and a standard- 
bred mare can not be registered in either the 
American Trotting Register or the American Stud 
Book." 

This is a common sense answer, and we hope Cali- 
fornia farmers will ponder on such a statement 
from the best authority on breeding in the United 
States. A breeding bureau that is started with a 
$500 stallion that can only run six furlongs in 1:17%. 
with 109 pounds up, will certainly not be able to 
add much stamina to our California horses, let 
alone improving them in other ways. 



THE FIFTH REN'EWAI, of that very liberal stake 
for three-year-old trotters and pacers, the American 
Horse Breeders' Futurity, is advertised in this issue. 
This is the stake where the breeder gets "a square 
deal for a dollar," and we advise every reader of 
the Breeder and Sportsman who owns a mare that 
he bred to a trotting or pacing stallion in 1907, to 
send $1.00 to the American Horse Breeder Publishing 
Company, 162 High street, Boston, Mass., accom- 
panied with the nomination of his mare in this stake. 
The Eastern market is the big market for horses 
that have extreme speed, and any owner of a sound 
colt that shows a high rate of speed can get a good 
price for him from Eastern buyers, if the colt is 
entered in stakes that are trotted and paced on the 
other side of the Mississippi river. This futurity is 
worth $10,000, of which $7,000 goes to three-year-old 
trotters, and $3,000 to three-ye'ar-old pacers. First 
money in the trot is $5,000, and in the pace $2,000, 
while $700 additional goes to the nominators of 
money-winners, and $300 will be paid to the nom- 
inator of the dam of winner of first money in the 
trot, whether he owns the colt at the time of the 
race or not. If you should nominate your mare, and 
should sell the, colt when it was dropped, and the 
new owner of the colt kept it paid up on, and won 
the stake, you would get $300 for your investment 
of one dollar. This stake is worth taking a chance 
in, and one of the principal features of it is that 
there is no newspaper subscription clause in it. 
You pay $1 to nominate, March 2, 1908; $5 on 
weanlings November 2, 1908, and $5 on yearlings 
May 3, 1909. No more payments are due until 
the year of the race. No more liberal stake was 
ever devised and we hope a goodly number of Cali- 
fornia breeders will take a chance in it. Read the 
advertisement in this issue. 



NEXT TUESDAY the speed committee of the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 
will meet at this office to formulate a program of 
harness racing for the regular fall meeting of the 
association. Messrs. I. L. Borden, C. A. Durfee, 
and T. J. Crowley comprise this committee and are 
fully competent to arrange classes that will not 
only fill well but furnish excellent contests. As 
soon as the Breeders Association announces its 
program, place and date of meeting, every other 
organization in the State' should do the same with- 
out delay. A good circuit will be assured if this 
is done. 



BREEDERS ASSOCIATION TO ARRANGE 
PROGRAM. 



A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Pa- 
cific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association was 
held last Wednesday, and those who have horses 
to race this year on the Pacific Coast Circuit will 
be pleased to learn that the association will immedi- 
ately begin active preparations towards giving a 
big harness meeting this year. The Speed Com- 
mittee consists of Messrs. Crowley, Durfee and 
Borden and has been directed by the; Board to hold 
a meeting on Tuesday next to formulate a program 
of races for the fall meeting and to advertise it 
without delay. This is a step in the right direction 
and should be followed by all the other associations. 
Those who contemplate having horses in training 
this season want to know positively what the pros- 
pect is going to be of getting races for their horses. 
The dilatoriness of the associations and managers 
of tracks in not announcing their programs early 
in the season is most discouraging to horsemen 
who, without assurance of meetings and classes for 
their horses, are in doubt as to the advisability of 
going to the expense of training. Of late years the 
uncertainty of a good circuit in California that has 
confronted the horsemen early in the season, has 



driven many owners to making engagements on 
the Eastern and Middle Western Circuits who would 
have preferred to race nearer home had they been 
assured of a continuous circuit here. If it could 
positively be announced that a meeting over every 
mile track in California would 1>s^ given and a 
circuit arranged to the best advantage in regard to 
shipping from one place to the next, a great boom 
would be given racing here and the meetings could 
all be made more than self-supporting. In places 
where there is no regular association or where the 
association is backward abouf coming forward, let 
several public spirited and energetic citizens who 
are interested and love the sport take the initiative, 
get out a program and talk the kind of business 
horsemen will understand. Their efforts will be 
appreciated and they will be rewarded by a big 
entry list which is the prime factor in making a 
successful meeting. To them will be all the glory 
and by good management it need not be all glory 
but what is essential to the permanent success of 
any enterprise, and that is dividends. It is not 
necessary to close all the events early in the spring 
but to announce a full program and make some of 
the events early closing. By* keeping all of the 
horses here, liberal advertising, getting up excur- 
sions from surrounding towns at the time of the 
meeting and good management, the meetings can 
be made to pay not only those who give them, but 
the merchants and business men of the town, 
besides advancing the big interest of breeding 
harness horses. 

At the meeting of the Board of Directors, Presi- 
dent Heald announced that he had been invited 
by Major P. P. Johnston, President of the National 
Trotting Association, to attend the Biennial Con- 
gress of that governing organization and act on 
the Committee on Rules. Prof. Heald, for Over 
thirty years, has been a breeder of harness horses 
and for a great many years has been President of the 
P. C. T. H. B. A., and has always taken a great 
interest in its affairs and in harness racing in Cali- 
fornia. He is a member of the Pacific District Board 
of Appeals of the National Trotting Association and 
is as well posted on rules governing harness racing 
and the conditions on this Coast as any man in the 
country. The Board passed a resolution commend- 
ing the appointment and authorizing Prof. Heald 
to specially represent the Association at the Con- 
gress. Nearly all of the members on this Coast 
who will not have a special representative at the 
Congress have sent credentials to Prof. Heald to 
represent them, having implicit confidence in his 
judgment and his knowledge of the requirements 
as to what is best to be done for the interests of 
the members on this Coast. 

A communication from M. D. Wisdom, Secretary 
of the North Pacific Fair Circuit, was read, suggest- 
ing that the managers of the fairs in the north get 
together early in the season and announce their 
stakes early so as to hold the horsemen on this 
Coast and arrange a Pacific Coast Circuit so that 
the big meetings in Washington and Oregon would 
follow the California Circuit, with one week be- 
tween the California State Fair and the Oregon 
State Fair at Salem. Mr. Burke was appointed a 
committee of one to see if this matter could not 
be arranged with the California State Agricultural 
Society so that dates will be taken that will not 
conflict. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 



S. E. McBride, Visalia. — Dora Doe is a bay mare, 
foaled, we believe, in 1895. She was owned in 1899 
by a man named McAlpine, who lived at Yuba City, 
Sutter county, and was sold by him to Sam Hooper, 
who raced her and gave her a record of 2:12% at 
San Jose in 1900. She is by Don Lowell 2:14^. but 
we do not know her dam's breeding. Don Lowell Is 
by Don Marvin, out of Esmeralda by Brigadier. 



Chris. Anderson, Areata. — The term "Full Blood" 
is applied to any animal that is eligible to registra- 
tion in the books of the breed to which it belongs. 
It Is used to denote that they are purely bred. Thus 
there are full blooded Berkshire swine, Shropshire 
sheep, Holstein cattle, Langshan fowls, etc. The 
term thoroughbred is correctly applied to the run- 
ning horse that is eligible to registration In the Eng- 
lish or American Stud Books; he is the race horse. 
Standard breds are trotting or pacing bred horses 
that are eligible to registration In the American 
Trotting Register. A horse can be trotting bred and 
still be ineligible to registration. 



R. J. McGrayn, City. — The jack-ass is the male ass. 
The female ass is called a jenny. When the male ass 
is bred to a female horse the product Is a mule, and 
being a hybrid will not breed. The offspring of a 
jack and a jenny is an ass, the sex determining 
whether it it a jack or a jenny. A female mule will 
not breed, neither will a male mule, though there 
have been a few exceptions to this rule. The produce 
of a jenny and a stallion is called a hinny, and is like 
the mule, a hybrid and will not breed. The donkey 
is an ass and the name is applied to either sex. 



i 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 



i Southern California Gossip * 

Our Mr. J. R. Fronefleld, who has been in Southern 
California for the past two weeks, sends us the fol- 
lowing interesting gossip of the harness horses he 
saw at the different tracks: 

Los Angeles Work-outs. 

In Will Durfee's string last week, there was con- 
siderable doing in the way of speed. Carol (4), by 
Del Coronado, trotted a mile in 2:17%, last eighth 
in 15% seconds. Wickie Wickie (4), by the same 
sire, trotted a mile in 2:22, last quarter in 31% 
seconds. Cleopatra (5), a green pacer by Zolock, 
went a mile in 2:11. with the last quarter in 30 
seconds, and wears no hopples. A two-year-old by 
Petigriu trotted a mile in 2:26%, with a quarter 
in 34% seconds, and looks like a good one; is out 
of a James Madison mare. A Del Coronado year- 
ling out of a James Madison mare showed an eighth 
in 18 seconds. The bay stallion Owynex 2:22 trot- 
ting, by Owyhee 2:11 out of Inex by Sweepstakes 
298, is one of the handsome horses in the country. 
He has been converted to the pace and can simply 
fly at that way of going. The Del Coronados are 
all fast and give every impression of being high- 
class race horses like their sire. A three-year-old 
filly by him trotted a quarter in 35 seconds and a 
two-year-old an eighth in 19 seconds. A yearling 
by Petigru paced a half in 1:15. One of the best 
ones in Durfee's string is the green mare Zomalta by 
Zombro that has worked a mile in 2:09 and brushed 
an eighth recently to cart in 15 seconds. Silver 
Dick, the green pacer by Geo. W. McKinney, that 
won at the last matinee in 2:12 flat, has been a mile 
in 2:10 with the last half in 1:02%, and the last 
quarter in 30 seconds. Avalon, a grand looking big 
green trotter, has shown a half in 1:06. He is by 
Mendocino, and belongs to Clarence Rerry of Selma, 
Cal. Dewey, a green pacer that wears no hopples, 
has been a mile in 2:08%, with the last quarter in 
30 seconds. There are six more green pacers, some 
going with and some without hopples, and a few 
green trotters with quarters in 34 seconds to their 
credit, which is a livery stable clip down here. The 
principals of Durfee's racing stable for the coming 
season are Carlokin 2:13%, Del Coronado 2:09%, 
Murray M. (3) 2:14, Copa de Oro 2:07%, and the 
green trotter Regalo, that matineed in 2:09 the other 
day. They are all taking slow work and looking 
fine. Regalo should really be excepted from the 
"siow workers," as he has been taking some stiff 
work and is now fit and ready, and can step fast 
all the way. 

Walter Maben's stable contains a number of real 
good ones. There is a yearling by Zombro that has 
been a quarter in 31 seconds already on the trot, 
and a bay stallion by Heir-at-Law 2:05% out of 
a mare by Axtell 2:12, that, has paced a mile in 2:15, 
with the last half in 1:04, and looks like one that 
would take a very low record. Walter has just 
started to work a green pacer by Athablo, sire of 
last year's stake winner Nogi 2:17%, and has been 
a quarter in 33 seconds with him. Ida Middleton 
2:20, whose matinee record is 2:14 trotting, has 
shown a mile in 2:12. A green trotter by Zombro 
out of a mare by Albion, turned a mile in 2:14 very 
handily, and a pacing full brother to Alfred D. 
2:12% is just converted to pacing and can brush 
very fast. A green trotter by James Madison looks 
like the goods, having been a mile in 2:13 with the 
last quarter in 30% seconds. A great bred one is a 
five-year-old mare by Sidney Dillon out of By By by 
Nutwood. She has trotted a mile in 2:17, with the 
last quarter in 32% seconds. There are not many 
like her. A nice green mare just started up has 
shown 2:30 and will soon have her name in the 
papers. She is by McKinney. A green mare by Mon- 
bells showed a mile in 2:16 with the last quarter 
in 31% seconds, and is a sure trotter of the right 
kind. The Pig, as the fastest green pacer in Cali- 
fornia is called around this track, is one that wears 
no hopples and makes no mistakes. His fastest 
mile was in 2:03%, and the last quarter of this mile 
was in 30% seconds. This pacer has never been 
to the races, but has been talked about for two 
years. 

Ted Hayes is -training a string of horses for Morris 
Brothers. Modicum, whose record is 2:13 pacing and 
2:17% trotting, worked a mile in 2:15 with a quarter 
in 30% seconds. Alsandra by Bonnie Direct has 
been a mile in 2:17, last half in 1:05 and last quarter 
in 31 seconds. The world-beating weanling by 
Bon Voyage is out in the infield for a few days. 

J. O. Gerrety has Mr. W. A. Clark, Jr.'s, horses 
all in good shape. Bon Voyage 2:12% has been a 
mile in 2:17% with the last quarter in 31 seconds. 
Miss Georgie 2:08% is only jogging now, but looks 
fine. Beulah, a four-year-old by Nutwood Wilkes, 
showed a mile in 2:15% with the last quarter in 
30% seconds, and the green trotter Liberty Song 
by Liberty Chimes showed a mile in 2:23%. Buck 
2:20% recently worked a mile in 2:16%. Chiquita 
(3) by Highland C. 2:19% has trotted a full mile 
in 2:37%, with the last quarter in 37 seconds. This 
filly has just been converted to trotting and does 
it so squarely and in such good form that no one 
would ever guess she had been a pacer, and a very 
fast one as a two-year-old. 

J. II. Torrey of Long Beach is going very care- 
fully with the Zombro filly Bessie T. This filly raced 
well last year under adverse conditions and should 
show well this year as she is entered in the stakes. 



G. A. Pounder has a colt by Audubon Boy 1:59% 
out of a McKinney mare that is not only of the 
bluest blood, but perfectly formed. It was foaled 
on Christmas Day, just a week too soon for a stake 
winner. 

In Sam Murphy's stable is Zoe, a two-year-old filly 
by Zombro, that trotted a quarter in 38 seconds as 
a yearling. Charley Wilkes, a fine year-old trotter 
by Nutwood Wilkes has been a mile in 2:24%, and 
a quarter in 34 seconds. Zombietta, a green trotter 
by Zombro, won her race at the last matinee, the 
third heat in 2:13% eased up. Doesn't that look 
good? Direct Maid, a green trotter, has been a 
mile in 2:20, last quarter in 33 seconds. The three- 
yt a -old pacer Alice by Zolock, a half in 1:12 without 
hopples, and will soon do although very green. May 
McKinney is a green one of the kind that it pays to 
train. A green pacer by Linda Richmond out of a 
Sultan mare, trot'ed a quarter in 34 se'.onds with 
little work, and a weanling colt by Syboleer paces 
and pulls a man in a cart as though it was play 
for him. 

Henry Delaney, the man that made Zolock 2:05%, 
Jonesa Basler 2:05%, Queen Pomona 2:07%, Delilah 
2:08, Welcome Mac (matinee record 2:08), Virginia 
2:09% and others, has Queen Pomona and a small 
stable of well bred youngsters. The Queen is look- 
ing fine but is only jogging as yet. A green pacer by 
Rey Direct 2:10, out of a McKinney mare, will be 
talked about, Delaney says, whenever he is ready 
to step her up. Another green pacer by Nutford 
out of a McKinney mare has been a mile in 2:12, 
and all the youngsters are looking well and can 
brush fast. In a recent newsy letter to Delaney, 
Jas. Gatcomb wrote that he will some time come 
back to California. 

James Stewart has a stable of nine head, but 
nothing much is being done with any of them in 
the way of speed except a two-year-old filly by Di- 
ablo out of a marejoy Athadon. that will make all 
the two-year- olds sit up and take notice. 

J. J. Rupp's eighteen months old colt by Red McK. 
covered an eighth in 21% seconds on the trot re- 
cently very impressively. 

Fred Ward has been riding easy behind Magladi 
2:10%, but has driven the green trotter Emily W. 
by James Madison a mile in 2:10%, and the pacer 
Explosion a mile in 2:08%. The pacer Siegfried 
turned the track very handily, the other day, very 
close to 2:10 and won his last matinee race in 2:12. 
Neerguard has been a mile in 2:16% and brushes 
fast. Red Lock, a Zolock stud out of a mare by 
Atto Rex, is good enough to go to the races and 
has shown 2:16 for the mile. Another that will take 
some beating from now on is Shecam 2:12%. 

Ramona S., a green trotter by Zombro out of an 
Anteeo mare is owned by Ed. Swaby of Dixon, and is 
being trained by Ted Hayes. She worked a mile in 
2:18 last summer and is a good prospect. 

L. E. Shaw's yearling by Adjutant is out of the dam 
of Bystander 2:07%, and he has a full brother to it 
that is a great big weanling. Both are pacers with 
the right way of going. 

J. P. Gaines has a four-year-old brown stud by 
Zombro that has trotted a mile in 2:35%, with a 
quarter in 36 seconds, and can go much faster. 

Mr. J. C. Grubb of Galesburg, Illinois, came to 
Los Angeles to find the exact condition of the draft 
horse market, thinking he would soon ship out a 
car-load of -workers, reserving enough room in the 
car for his Allerton stallion Redlac 2:07%, but find- 
ing the market stagnant, will not ship for some forty 
to fifty days. 

John W. Snowden, Secretary of the California 
Breeders Association, works hard to boost 
everything that tends to help the matinee game 
in Los Angeles, and to improve things generally 
for the light harness horse breeders. He has Scrap- 
py Nell, matinee record (3) 2:26, trial 2:18, bred 
regularly. Her oldest is a two-year-old by Limonero, 
that has just been started up and brushed a quarter 
in 40 seconds, mocking a real trotter at every step. 
A yearling by the same horse and a weanling by 
Direeho are both large and fine lookers and will soon 
get a little early education. The mare was bred to 
Redlac last summer and is soon due to foal. 

At San Bernardino. 

The sight of snow-capi>ed hills backing the green 
and gold of orange groves, and a good track and 
stables with plenty of grass, is inspiring to the horse- 
man who visits "San Berdoo." 

Packer & Donahue have here a stable of nine 
head. A three-year-old by On Stanley that has 
just been taken up, worked a quarter last summer 
as a two-year-old in 38 seconds. A three-year-old by 
Zolock out of Laura Inca, dam of Sir Gird 2:27, is a 
fast filly. A half sister by Ben Z., son of Zolock, 
has trotted a mile in 2:30 with a quarter in 33 sec- 
onds, with six weeks' work. She is a four-year-old. 
The first colt, R. Ambush 2:11% ever sired is in 
this string. He is a two-year-old trotter and is 
staked all down the line. As he can show a 2:30 shot 
very handily, will bear keeping in mind. A fancy 
filly by Izalco, full brother to Delilah, belonging to 
Dr L W Orne, D. V. S. of San Bernardino, can step 
fast and is surely the making of a fast trotter. 
Several in this string are still in the infant class, 
but beginning to step along. 

Rutherford & Young have 16 stalls occupied. They 
have Zolock 2:05%. R. Ambush 2:11%, and Ben Z., 
a Zolock stallion that has a lot of speed at the trot; 
he was a winner at I lie last matinee with a heat in 
2:30%. Another young stud in this stable is Con- 
queror (2) 2:16, by Direct Heir out of La Belle (2) 
2:16 by Sidney. He beat Ray o' Light one heat at 



Santa Rosa. Delilah 2:08 and Josephine (3) 2:20% 
are running out and looking good. The latter was 
second to Hymettus in 2:13%, 2:10% and 2:09%, 
and timed separately in her Woodland race in 2:10% 
with the last half in 1:01%. Both will be taken up 
about the middle of February and put to jogging. 
A three-year-old pacing filly by Sky Pointer Jr. has 
been bred to Zolock. She worked a mile in 2:27%, 
with the last half in 1:11. Easter, a two-year-old by 
Monicrat out of Atterina by Atto Rex, stepped a full 
mile last matinee day, December 5th, 1907, in 2:32, 
with the last quarter in 35 seconds. That is going 
some for a yearling, and he looks the great trotter 
that he is. Several of the remaining youngsters 
show plenty of speed for the amount of work done 
on them, and are a nicely gaited lot. A choice one 
is a yearling trotter by On Stanley 2:17%. 

Chas. Thornquest has a stable of six, including 
Adjutant 2:18, and some likely youngsters by this 
horse. He has a three-year-old pacer by On Stanley 
out of Nellie Bly, that worked a trial mile as a 
two-year-old in 2:15%, half in 1:04%, quarter- in 
30% seconds, and won a matinee race December 5th 
in 2:21%. Mr. Thornquest also has a green trotter 
by Neernut 2:12% that is considered a good prospect. 

G. W. Bonnell, of Redlands, is at this track with a 
string of six, including the four-year-old stallion 
Velox by Zolock out of a strictly thoroughbred mare. 
He is a pacer, never trained much, but can step a 
quarter in 35 seconds any time and was a winner in 
his last two matinee races. Adalantha is a two- 
year-old pacing gelding by Zolock that is green but 
has worked a mile in 2:17%, and there is a four-year- 
old trotting filly by Zolock out of a Woolsey mare 
that was a close second, in 2:21 in a matinee. 
Arrow Stanley is a stud three years old by On 
Stanley out of an Electioneer mare, that has a nice 
way of going and will be given careful training this 
season. Mr. Bonnell is just breaking a three-year- 
old filly by Badger Boy 2:11, that shows good as a 
trotter. Norda, an unmarked pacer by Mercury- 
out of Bessie Dale by Brown Hal, raced nicely last 
year, and should do well this year as she has shown 
a trial in 2:11% over a track not considered fast. 

William Rourke owns two fine stallions in On 
Stanley (3) 2:17%, by Direct 2:05%, and a five-year 
old that is a full brother to Hazel Kinney 2:09%. 
This colt is registered as Larry Kinney 43,322, and 
in his only start won a matinee race and trotted the 
last quarter in 34 seconds 

R. Ambush 41840, the good colt trotter by Zolock 
2:05%, that reduced his record to 2:11% last season, 
winning the $5000 stake at Salem, when he beat 
North Star 2:11%, Carlokin 2:13%, Berta Mac 2:13%, 
Freddie C. Jr., Satin Royal and others, is here. 
His dam is May Kinney by Silk wood 2:07, second 
dam Satinella by McKinney 2:11%, third dam Laura 
Inca by Echo, etc. He raced as a two-year-old. tak- 
ing a mark of 2:20, as a three-year-old took a race 
record of 2:14%, as a five-year-old trotted to his 
present record which is the trotting record for the 
Salem track and the Northwest. In all his racing 
career was never behind the money. After a season 
in the stud he will be raced again this year. 

At Riverside. 

There is a good half-mile track here and much 
interest in the light harness horse. 

Dr. F. A. Ramsey is in line with two handsome 
stallions. Baron of Glenwood, black horse, trial 
2:14%. is by Oakland Baron, out of Alma Wilkes 
by Baron Wilkes, and is one that is bred right, looks 
right and breeds right. The other is the three-year- 
old Don Reginaldo by On Stanley, out of Belle Ray- 
mon, second dam Gypsy, the dam of Delilah and 
grandam of Zolock, by Gen. Booth. This colt is one 
of the best lookers in the county and a trotter. The 
regret of his future is that he is entered in but one 
stake — the Pacific Breeders' Futurity — as, barring 
accidents he has a royal chance in any company. 
Dr. Ramsey also has Lola Belle, a brown mare (4) 
by .Major Bell. Son of Helsire, out of a mare by Lock- 
heart 2:08%. This young mare is in foal to Baron 
of Glenwood. 

Mr. T. Churchill Cobb, of Wellsville, New York, 
of the firm of Cobb Bros., owners of Direct Hal 
2:04% and Mainsheet 2:05, is spending the winter 
in Riverside and other Southern California towns. 
Mr. Cobb is the owner of the McKinney mare Juliet 
D., the dam of Irish 2:08% pacing, the horse that 
was converted to the trot, but died before getting a 
record at that gait. Mr. Cobb declares that Irish 
was as fast as Mainsheet at the trot and feels the 
loss of what he considered after a few trials as one 
of the great sensational trotters. Mr. Cobb says that 
Irish was always a bad gaited pacer, but when he 
got going at the trot was as smooth as oil. Juliet 
D. is now at P. J. Williams' farm at San Leandro, 
and is again in foal to Monterey 2:09%. She will 
be shipped east in the spring, and they hope to 
raise another like Irish. 

Mr. Cobb's Companion in his travels is Mr. 
Milton Churchill of Toledo, Ohio, formerly of Rush- 
ville, Indiana. He is the owner of Joe Wilkes 2:12% 
by Roy Wilkes. Joe Wilkes' record was made over 
a half-mile track last year at Baltimore. This horse 
will be in the stable of Al. Thomas next seaeon, and 
will be staked all down the line. 

Mr. E. F. Binder of Riverside has two stallions 
that tie will offer for sale, now that he has sold the 
race-track property here. They are young, well 
bred and good looking. Some one can secure a 
bargain. The track is now leased to the driving 
club by the new owner. 

The Zolock stallion is four years old, and out of 
Fern wood 2:23% by Silkwood 2:07. He is a big 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



horse, reported a sure breeder, and sires colts with 
plenty of size and quality. The other horse is by 
Allerton 2.09%, out of Eoka by Sphinx, and is a 
fine big trotter that should make an excellent stock 
horse. Several young things by Expedition and 
Worth While are being broken and later will be 
offered for sale. 

Mr. L. Fotter has a green mare by Zolock that 
has shown a nice way of going at the trotting gait, 
developing a 2:24 clip with little work, and a three- 
year-old gelding by Stanton Wilkes 2:10%, that 
looks like a good prospect. 

G. H. Judd is training a string of ten head. Includ- 
ing a green stallion by McKinney out of Zoe Patch 
by Mambrino Patchen, etc., that is "some trotter." 
A mile by this fellow in 2:25 over the half-mile 
track means considerable. Madie. a green pacer by 
Silver Coin 2:10 ( Stein way-McKinney mare), has 
been a mile in 2:18 pacing, and being a big, fine 
looking mare, and nicely gaited, has many admirers. 
The remainder are a nice lot of young things that 
are a credit alike to stock farm and race track. 

At Santa Ana. 

The race track here is in good shape, and several 
young trotters are quartered there, being broke and 
gaited. 

Charles Farran will open a public stable there 
about February 1st. 

Geo. W. Ford finds on looking over records and 
reports that 49 of the get of his stallion Neernut 
2:12% have taken records or gone trials in from 
2:09% to 2:30. Mrs. Lizzie Stiger of Berkeley, Cal., 
purchased Nutbrush, a pacing gelding by Neernut. 
This gelding was matineed at Los Angeles, was a 
winner, and had a mile in 2:14. Mrs. Stiger writes 
that she is well pleased with this horse as he has 
speed and is a pleasant driver. 

Franklin Anderson, the gentleman that bought 
Burnut 2:13% at Phoenix, Arizona, last fall, in a 
recent letter to Mr. Ford states that the horse 
shows great form in their matinee races, and he 
now finds he owns a great trotter, which will be 
fully proven this season in the races. Goldnut 2:11% 
has a few choice weanlings to repesent him, and if 
their looks can be relied on will make a great stock 
horse. He is set down as a 2 : 08 trotter next season. 

After seeing the horses working out here, I have 
come to the conclusion that any horse that wins 
a matinee race, around Los Angeles, San Bernar- 
dino, Riverside or Santa Ana will about do to go 
to the races. 

o 

RIVERSIDE DRIVING CLUB. 



The annual banquet and business meeting of the 
Riverside Driving Association was held on the 
evening of Jtnuary 9th, when a permanent organi- 
zation was perfected. It was voted to hold a matinee 
race meet on Washington's birthday at the River- 
side Driving Park, for which a permanent lease was 
made. Officers and directors for the new year were 
elected as follows: 

President, — Herman G. Stanley. 

Vice-President — J. F. Backstrand. 

Secretary — Dr. F. A. Ramsey. 

Treasurer — J. T. Garner. 

General Manager of Track — G. H. Judd. 

Starter — Herman Stanley. 

Clerke of Course — W. L. Scott. 

Speed Committee — Axel Nelson, G. M. Carrigan 
and J. T. Garner. 

Directors— W. A. Hayt, J. F. Backstrand, J. T. 
Garner, G. H. Judd, Alex Nelson, Dr. F. A. Ramsey 
and G. M. Carrigan. 

At the banquet John T. Garner officiated as toast- 
master. Several members of the San Bernardino 
Driving Club were present, including Thomas 
Holmes, R. O. Buckman, Joe Kelly, Homer Ruther- 
ford and Nick Young, all of whom were called upon 
for short talks. Among other who spoke briefly was 
W. A. Hayt, who despite his advanced years, takes 
a lively interest in all racing matters. 

It is proposed that the meet to be held February 
22 shall be the best in the history of the association. 
o 

H. T. Helm died recently at Los Angeles, Cal., 
aged seventy-seven years. He was one of the first 
horsemen to write a book about the American trot 
ter. Rand & McNelly published his "American 
Roadsters and Trotting Horses" thirty years ago. 
In it Mr. Helm advanced the theory that the speed 
of a harness hore was largely dependent on the 
animal's conformation. J. H. Wallace, who was the 
first to maintain that the trot was in the head and 
not in the legs, dubbed it the "tape line theory," 
and so ridiculed the author that he made a bonfire 
of manuscripts prepared for a second volume of his 
work and soon afterward gave? up all connection 
with horses. 



William Bradley, who purchased the trotting 
stallion Todd at the recent Old Glory sale for 
$30,000, has also purchased the Hackney Oxford 
King to place in the stud at his breeding farm in 
New Jersey. Oxford King was bred by II. McK. 
Twombley and was got by imported Acrobat from 
a daughter of Confidence. 



Turley 2:07%, the famtnis trotting gelding raced 
the past three sasons by E. F. Geers and sold at 
the late Old Glory Sale, is now being used as a 
saddle horse in Central Park, New York, by C. K. 
G. Billings, who now owns him. 



ANOTHER FINE COLT FOR AUSTRALIA. 



On the steel steamer Foreric, Captain Gardner, 
which cleared from this port for Australia last Satur- 
day, was a black colt bred by Mr. S. H. Wright of 
Santa Rosa, and consigned by him to Mr. F. W. 
Krempin. of Newcastle, New South Wales. The colt, 
as his picture herwith will show, is a very handsome 
youngster. He was foaled on the 13th of March, 
1907, being ten months old when shipped. The 
photograph fioin which the picture was made was 
taken last October, when the colt was but seven 
months old. The colt was sired by that splendid 
son of McKinney. Zolock 2:05%, sire of Sherlock 
Holmes 2:06%, Bystander 2:07%, Delilah 2:08 and 
many other fast performers. The colt's dam is 
Maud P. 2:26 by Idaho Patchen 2:26%, son of Henry 
Patchen 2:32%, he by Geo. M. Patchen 30, one of 
the trotting champions of forty-five years ago, whose 
record of 2:23% was made in 1860. The dam of 
Maud 1'. was Lady Moor, and she the dam of Arthur 
W. 2:11%, and John A. 2:12%. Lady Moor was 
by Grand Moor, that sired dams of Joe Wheeler 
2:07%, Humboldt Maid 2:13% and Lady Waldstein 
2: ir>. The next dam was the Dinsmore mare by 
Glencoe Chief, he by Keokuk 546, out of a mare by 
imported Glencoe. The next dam was a daughter 




of Ethan Allen Jr. 2903, a son of Ethan Allen 43. 
The breeding of Maud P., dam of this colt, is in very 
strong lines. The descendants of Geo. M. Patchen, 
The Moor, and imported Glencoe, have always been 
noted for their endurance and gameness, and crossed 
with the blood of a race horse like Zolock, the result 
cannot help being colts of the staying kind. On Mr. 
Wright's farm at Santa Rosa there are not many 
mares, but those he has are choice and he considers 
Maud P. one of the best, although none of her get 
are old enough to race. Her two-year-old by Lyn- 
wood W. is a trotter, and has shown enough in his 
breaking to convince Mr. Wright that he is as 
promising as any he ever raised and on his farm 
were born Sonoma Girl 2:05%, Charley Belden 2:08% 
and other fast ones. Mr. Wright now has there 
Nellie Fairmount, dam of Zambra, holder of the 
world's five-mile trotting record, Belle W., dam of 
Bolivar 2:00%, the fastest pacer ever bred in Cali- 
fornia, and Maud Fowler, dam of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, 
the leading money winner of 1907. Maud P., al- 
though she has yet to make her fame as a brood- 
mare, is therefore in high class company, and when 
it is stated that Mr. Wright considers her one of 
his best, it will readily be seen that he puts a high 
value on her. Maud P. was a good race mare and 
trotted a mile at Stockton, driven by the late James 
Sullivan in 2:13, and could have beaten 2:10, it. is 
said. Her colt by Zolock will be a splendid addition 
to the choicely bred American horses that have gone 
to Australia, and we hope he may have a good trip 
and be safely landed, as he will certainly make a 
reputation there for California bred hoises that will 
lead to many further consignments from here. He 
is ;i natural trotter like his two-year-old half-brother. 
Lynwood Patchen. 

The picture of the colt printed herewith was taken 
when he was seven months old. 

o 

THE CHICAGO HORSE MARKET. 



The demand for horses is on the increase at Chi- 
cago, after two months' of poor business. 

Prices have not recovered all the loss of last fall, 
although the market is on a much healthier basis 
than during the panic. 

There is a good demand for well-mannered horses, 
but they are scarce in the country. 

The quotations of last week were as follows for 
good to choice of the various kinds: 



Drafters $175@275 

Loggers and feeders 135@200 

Chunks 110@150 

Farm mares and small chunks 80(5)135 

Light drivers 150^360 

Actors and coachers 160(^370 

Carriage pairs 290(&650 

Western (branded) OOfalOO 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



NEWS FROM THE NORTH. 



[Rural Spirit. January 15.] 

Fred Shaft, owner of Sherlock Holmes 2:06%, is 
negotiating with Ben Walker, of California, to drive 
Sherlock this year. 

The Portland Horse Sale Company are arranging 
to hold another auction .sale of horses the last week 
in April or first week in May of this year. 

The mare Maud L., that was raced on the North 
Pacific Circuit last year by J. Grant", seems to have 
a dark cloud hanging over her identity. Some horse- 
men here claim she is no other than Foxie Curd 
2:07. The winnings of Maud L. were protested 
at Winnipeg. 

William Williamson, of Nampa. Idaho, has pur- 
chased the stallion Christmas Chimes 2:19 and his 
daughter Nellie Chimes from Repeje and Perry, of 
Michigan. Christmas Chimes 2:19 is a son of 
Chimes; dam Beattie, a producing daughter of Mam- 
brino King and was bred on the noted Village farm. 
Nellie Chimes is out of Knob by Sir Denton. Mr. 
Williamson owns other standard bred trotters and 
is laying the foundation lor a breeding farm. 

The annual meeting of the North Pacific Fair 
Association has been announced for February 6. 
At this meeting dates will be arranged for a circuit 
of fairs throughout the Pacific Northwest Repre- 
sentatives who attend this meeting should come 
prepared to announce a speed program. This is 
absolutely imperative in justice to their own asso- 
ciation, as well as others on the circuit. California 
horsemen have their eye on this circuit, and if 
purses are to their liking most of them will race 
here the coming season. The two big stakes at 
Salem have a wonderful influence in starting the 
horses this way, and with Portland on the circuit 
with equally as large a program there will be but 
little doubt about getting the horses this far. The 
balance of the circuit should arrange some 
attractive events, and no doubt will, as good, clean 
harness racing seems to be gaining ground every- 
where. 

o 

LAST LIVING DAUGHTER OF H A M BL ETON I A N. 



Recent discovery of Rysdyk Maid 2:24%, probably 
the last surviving foal of Rysdyk's Hanibletonian, 
on a Massachusetts stock farm, is a reminder that 
many old time trotters of note are living out their 
last years in horse paradise, pensioners of men who 
have never forgotten that in their younger days 
these horses gave them enjoyment, honors and, in 
some cases, riches. 

Walace's Year Book shows that Rysdyk Maid was 
foaled in 1872 and is therefore thirty-six years old. 
She was bred by Dr. W. J. P. Kingsley. of Rome, 
N. Y., and started in her first race as a four-year-old 
just thirty-two years ago. It was ten years later, 
in her last campaign, that she gained her record 
of 2:24% in the sixth heat of a race over the Mystic 
Park track, in Boston. In the meantime she had 
trotted thirty-six races, winning five of them. Everett 
L. Smith and other New England horsemen remem- 
ber her as a punchy, lazy, sulky little dark mare, 
barely fifteen hands high, that John Riley used to 
drive with a spur and sometimes with a chain, so 
sluggish was she in races. 

After her retirement from the turf, in 1S86, she 
dropped out of sight and was put to breeding by J. 
J. Crawford, of Belmont, Mass., who then owned her. 
In 1893 she produced a bay filly, Easter, by Sal- 
viiii, that in 1901 won a race in the Grand Circuit, at 
Providence, gaining a record of 2:12%. 

The old mare is still on the Crawford farm, now 
owned by David L. Thomas. Few horsemen knew 
she was living until Mr. Smith discovered her. a few 
weeks ago. 

When thirty years old, Rysdyk Maid was tuned 
up for speed by Mr. Thomas' daughter on the farm 
track and trotted a quarter of a mile in public in 0:40 
at Combination Park, in Boston. 

Miss Thomas feeds the old mare on porridge in 
winter and in summer lets her nibblv grass in the 
pasture lot. Mr. Smith, who recently discovered this 
• last of the I lambletonians." says that Rysdyk Maid 
is still quite active and vigorous and seems likely 
to live for several years to come. 

o 

BREEDING THE AMERICAN TROTTING HORSE. 



An American Breeders' Association has been es- 
tablished with headquarters in Washington, D. C, 
in which Hon. James Wilson, Secretary of Agri- 
culture, is President, and Hon. W. H. Hays, Assistant 
Secretary of Agriculture, is Secretary, and the fol- 
lowing committee on the breeding of the American 
Trotting Horse has been appointed, viz.: 



Mr. II. K. Dcvereux, Chairman ... .Cleveland, Ohio 

Senator Jos. W. Bailey Gainesville, Tex. 

Mr. Wm. Russell Allen Pittsfield, Mass. 

Mr. Sterling R. Holt Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mr. Norman J. Oolman St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. R. C. Estill Lexington. Ky. 

Mr. A. B. Cox Paoli, Pa. 



The general duties of the Committee have been 
outlined as follows: 

First, To investigate and report, on methods of 
breeding trotting horses; and, second, to encourage 
the production of strains of the American Trotting 
Horse for business driving, and for carriage; driving. 
The annual meeting of this association will be held 
in Washington, D. G, January 28-30, 1908. 



k 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 



! NOTES AND NEWS I 
i I 

Zolock 2:05% will leave for Walla Walla, Wash., 
February 1st and will make the season of 1908 there. 



An advertiser who desires to raise carriage 
horses, wants a trotting stallion 16 hands or over, 
that weighs 1,300 pounds. A toppy fellow, one with 
style, good bone, and high action is desired. No 
pacers wanted. 



Livermore will probably hold a horse parade and 
stallion show this spring, a meeting of horsemen 
having been called for to-day, at that place, to decide 
on the matter. Livermore has held many such 
shows in the past that were a credit to all concerned 
and resulted in much good to all. Some fine stock 
has been brought into the country around Livermore 
during the past two years. 



From the way the young Bonnie McK's are act- 
ing, Mr. Geo. A. Kelly of Walla Walla has a coming 
great sire in this son of McKinney, whose dam 
Bosilene 2:14% was by Stamboul, and whose second 
dam Bon Bon 2:26 by Simmons, is the dam of Bonnie 
Direct 2:06%, Bonnie Steinway 2:06%, Rector 2:10% 
etc. 



Coney 2:02 and Edwin S. 2:05 are both now owned 
by Bostonians who are driving them on the snow 
speedways around the Hub this winter. 



Tom Hamilton, of San Diego, owns a team of four- 
year-olds by the Prodigal stallion Prochein, that are 
said to be as handsome a pair as were ever seen in 
the southern country. Mr. A. B. Clements, of 
Montana, who bred these horses, has recently pur- 
chased 400 acres of land in San Diego county, and 
has placed thereon the standard bred stallion Pro- 
chein 23532, the saddle stallion Red Squirrel and 
a band of about fifty mares and colts. 



Alex. Nelson of Riverside has been presented with 
a handsome trophy offered by Mr. W. A. Hayt, of the 
same town, to the owner of the horse making the 
fastest time on the Riverside driving track during 
the year 1907. Mr. Neson's horse McO. D., which 
he recently sold to Los Angeles parties for $1,500, 
paced the mile which won the trophy for Mr. Nelson. 



It is reported that an effort is being made to pur- 
chase the well known West Virginia trotting stallion 
Lord Roberts 2 : 7 V4 for export to Europe. 



Mr. W. S. Harkey's mare Deviletta 2:10% by 
Diablo 2:09%. that was raced some up north last 
year and bred to Hal B. 2:04%, is not in foal, more's 
the pity, as that mating might have produced a 
whirlwind pacer. It is Mr. Harkey's intention to 
breed this young mare to Aerolite (3) 2:11% this 
year. In condition and with good handling Deviletta 
should pace a mile in 2:06 or better, as she has a 
wonderful flight of speed. 



Bonnie Russell 2:10%, the bay staJlion by Conifer 
out of Bonnie Ela by Bonnie McGregor, second dam 
by Del Sur, is now in the string of Al Thomas at 
Benson. Nebraska. Bonnie Russell was bred in 
California and there were several law-suits over his 
ownership after he was taken east. He is a wonder- 
fully fast horse, but has been lame for two years 
and all his races during that time were trotted 
under adverse circumstances. Thomas has a repu- 
tation for fixing up lame horses and will put a good 
deal of time and attention toward effecting a cure 
for Bonnie Russell's lameness, if it can be ac- 
complished. Perfectly sound, the stallion is danger- 
ous in any company 



A gentleman's driving club is under practical con- 
sideration at present by many owners of fine horses 
in Pasadena, and if the plan proves feasible a club 
will soon be organized along lines similar to those 
followed by the Los Angeles driving club, which 
has held monthly matinee events throughout the 
season and which is now to make the matinee bi- 
monthly affairs. 



Wm. Clark, of Medford, Oregon, would like to 
leant the present address of Mr. Jiles Cain, a horse- 
man, who formerly resided at Fresno, and who was 
in Ashland, Oregon, three years ago with a car-load 
of horses. Mr. Clark will be thankful if anyone will 
send him Mr. Cain's present address. 



Los Angeles, having secured the removal of the 
race track from its limits, now proposes to stop the 
printing of form charts and the selling of tips on 
races run elsewhere. A stringent ordinance was 
passed by the City Council last Monday, which makes 
it unlawful to print, distribute, circulate, sell or give 
away in Los Angeles any form chart or circular bear- 
ing any information, prediction, selection or advice 
as to the winner or probable winner of any horse 
race or contest. It bears a penalty clause imposing 
a fine of not more than $500 or six months' imprison- 
ment, or both, upon conviction. City Attorney Hewitt 
is inclined to believe that the ordinance will prevent 
the publication of form charts on races of the day 
before. 



.1. W Zibbell of Fresno, owner of the great two- 
year-old Ally Katalina 2:22% by Tom Smith 
2:13%, informs us that he has a full 
brother to her which he likes much better 
than he did the filly at the same age. He is just 
breaking him and says he is a sure enough trotter. 
He believes that he has got a mortgage on next 
year's Futurity for two-year-olds with his youngsters. 
A horseman who recently saw the colt in Fresno 
informs us that he is one of the grandest looking 
yearling that he ever looked at, greatly resembling 
his sire, Tom Smith, who is considered one of the 
highest formed horses of the trotting family in 
America. 



Henry Parady, who had Santa Rosa Stock Farm's 
stallion Sky Pointer Jr. under lease, last year, 
making a good season with this son . of 
Star Pointer's full brother at Fresno, returned 
to Santa Rosa last week and after looking over the 
colts by Sky Pointer Jr. that are at the farm, asked 
Frank Turner what he asked for the stallion. 
Frank's reply was "$1,500," and Parady said, "I'll 
take him," about as soon as he could say it. Parady 
is in love with this horse and believes he will be 
one of the great speed sires as well . as a sire of 
useful horses for the road, as he gets size and 
style from all kinds of mares. Turner is of the 
same opinion, but as he has fifteen other studs on 
the farm it has become absolutely necessary to sell 
some, and he has placed a price on nearly all of 
them. Mr. Parady worked for the Santa Rosa Stock 
Farm five years and during that time broke all the 
colts that Sterling R. Holt purchased from Turner 
and Mr. S. B. Wright. He is a sober, industrious 
man and handles coltB well, both as a breaker and 
trainer. He will open a public training stable at 
Fresno and should get all he can do. 



The McKinney stallion Osito 2:13%, whose son 
Regalo won a heat in 2:09 at a recent Los Angeles 
matinee, has been owned by Mr C. E. Johnson, of 
Bishop, Inyo county, for the past six years, and has 
been bred to 30 or 40 mares each season on Mr. 
Johnson's ranch, and his owner races him against 
everything that comes along in the meantime. Al- 
though Osito is getting along in years, having been 
foaled in 1892, Mr. Johnson says he is able to skin 
anything that they import to Inyo county from Los 
Angeles. 



MOVED DOWN TOWN 
The Breeder and Sportsman 

is now located in the 
PACIFIC BUILDING, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, San Francisco. 
Offices 383, 365 and 366 

The stallion Billups 2:20% was foaled the prop- 
erty of Mr. J. L. Davis, and he is now and always 
has been that gentleman's horse, never having been 
sold nor offered for sale. This makes the fifth year 
that Billups has been under lease to Philip C. Byrne 
of Hanford, Cal., and Mr Byrne has never at any 
time owned any interest in the horse beyond the 
lease. We make this statement at the request of 
Mr. Byrne, it having been stated incorrectly that 
he was the owner of Bilups. 



The transcontinental endurance contest between 
Homer Davenport's Arabian stallion Mesoud and 
Gen. J. B. Castleman's Kentucky saddle mare Caro- 
lina, is billed to start in May next. The conditions 
require that the two horses shall be shipped to 
Oregon from New York at the same time and under 
the same conditions, that they be allowed to rest 
the same length of time, and that when starting 
in the contest they shall carry the same weight 
which is to be maintained during the entire trip. 



W. B. Linn of Martinsville, 111., is now at Sacra- 
mento, and brought over with him the successful show 
ring winner Mary Minis (2) 2:30 by The Bondsman, 
dam Serene, dam of two, by Allerton. 



Auburn, Placer county, is getting ready to hold a 
fair and race meeting. The gentlemen who lately 
bought the site of the old race track are preparing 
to put the grounds in order as fast as possible. 
They have organized the Placer Fair and Improve- 
ment Company, with the following directors: D. W. 
Lubeck, John M. Fullweiler, Charles Keena, Fred 
E. Brye and E. T. Robie. Fred. E. Brye was eiected 
president, D. W. Lubeck, treasurer, and W. A. Shep- 
ard, secretary. Messrs. Brye, Keena and Wise were 
appointed a committee on grounds. The stock is $10 
per share, and $3250 of it has already been sub- 
scribed. A call was made for 25 per cent of the 
stock subscribed. 



The Central Oregon Agricultural Association has 
set the date of October 17th, 1908, for the opening 
of its fair and race meeting at Prineville, which will 
be bigger and better than ever before A good race 
program is promised 



The price which W. C Nolan of Sonoma received 
for his four-year-old pacing mare, reported last week 
as sold through J. W. Zibbell to Geo. Estabrook of 
Denver, is given as $550. This mare has paced a mile 
in 2:20 on the Sonoma half-mile track, driven by 
Mr. Nolan. 



They have some big fairs in Texas. The total 
earnings of the last Texas State Fair amounted to 
$237,819.75, an increase of $27,228 over 1906, and 
the balance on hand is $95,762.38. President James 
Maroney recommends the erection of several new 
buildings, including a new grandstand and a club- 
house. 



It is said that Sterling McKinney 2:09% worked a 
mile while at Columbus, Ohio, last summer in 
2:06%. He repeatedly trotted quarters in 30% sec- 
onds and halves in 1:02. 



A late report from Moscow, Russia, states that 
the four-year-old mare Postee by Quartercousin, out 
of a Russian mare, lowered the ice record for trotters 
to 2:13%. 



While W. L. Snow was driving the pacer, J. J. J. 
2:06%, owned by J. J. Jermyn, Germantown, Pa., 
on the steets of Hornell, N. Y., the horse got scared 
and fell, breaking a leg and necessitating his being 
put to death. 



A concrete barn, 350 feet long and 60 feet wide 
is nearing completion at Empire City Farm, Cuba, 
N Y., where McKinney 2:11% and Axworthy 2:15%, 
are kept. 



Mike Bowerman, of Lexington, Ky., has bought 
from Groverland Farm, Georgetown, Ky., the bay 
colt Ashland Wilton, three-year-old record 2:17%, 
by Wilton 2:19%, dam Cardome, by Ashland Wilkes 
2:17%, second dam Ola Moore, by Onward 2:25%, 
third dam Nettie Time, by Mambrino Time. Mr. 
Bowerman is also negotiating for the four-year-old 
filly, Katie Williams, that trotted a mile in 2:10% 
at Ijexington last fall, as he has a very high opinion 
of her. 



When the buildings at Village Farm, East Aurora, 
New York, were torn down, recently, the old lumber 
sold for $13 per thousand, which is more than it 
originally cost. The farm where Chimes was once 
the premier of a great trotting-horse breeding es- 
tablishment is now to be cut up into building lots. 



The French standard for trotting horses is not 
so high as it is in America. To have '"standard" 
speed a horse must trot in 2:30 or pace in 2:25 in 
America, but in France the speed standard is two 
minutes to the kilometre, which is about five-eighths 
of a mile, which for a mile is at the rate of 3:12. 



The biennial meeting, or Congress of the National 
Trotting Association, will be held at the Murray 
Hill Hotel, New York, February 12th. Prof. E. P. 
Heald. President of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association, has been appointed one of the 
Committee on Rules and will attend the Congress 
as the representative for the Pacific Coast, many 
of the associations here, in membership with the 
N. T. A., having appointed him as their delegate. 



IOWA STATE FAIR PROGRAM. 



The State of Iowa holds a very successful fair 
every year, and has already announced its racing 
program. As an item of interest to Californians, we 
print this program, which is as follows. It will be 
noticed that there are six days of racing and that 
while the program opens on Saturday, it ends on 
Friday, and that but one running race is provided 
for each day, except the opening day. 

Saturday, August 22. 

Three-year-old, 2:25 pace, stake $ 600 

Trotting, 2:25 class 600 

Four furlong dash, running 100 

Seven furlong dash, running 200 

Monday, August 24. 

Two-year-olds, trotting, stake 400 

Trotting, 2:18 class °°? 

Pacing, 2:14 class °00 

Five furlong dash, running 100 

Tuesday, August 25. 

Three-year-olds, trotting, stake 600 

Trotting, 2:30 class, stake 1.000 

Pacing, 2:16 class 500 

Six furlong dash, running <=00 

Wednesday, August 26. 

Two-year-olds, pacing, stake 400 

Trotting, 2:15 class °00 

Trotting, 2:21 class, stake 1.000 

Four furlong dash, running 100 

Thursday, August 27. 

Pacing, 2:16 class, stake 1.000 

Trotting, 2:11 class 1.000 

Pacing. 2:22 class 600 

Five furlong dash, running 200 

Friday, August 28. 

Pacing, 2:30 class, stake 1.000 

Free-for-all, pacing L 5 00 

Eight furlong dash, running 300 

o 

Only One "BROMO QUININE." 

That is LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. Look. for the 
signature of K. W. GROVE. Used the world over to 
l*u re a Cold in One Pay. 25 cents. 

I 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THOROUGHBRED SIRES OF WINNERS. 



Statistics of the thoroughbred stallions for the 
year 19"07, owned and standing for service in Cali- 
fornia and Nevada, compiled by Harry Lowden from 
the list of sires which sired winners of races in the 
United States and Canada, in 1907, as published 
recently in the Kentucky Farmer and Breeder. The 
moneys won are first moneys only, no credit being 
given in this table for second or third money win- 
ners. 

The three leading stallions, Solitaire (Imp.), Can- 
opus (Imp.) and Rubicon trace to Touchstone. 
Solitaire and Canopus are grandsons of Hampton, 
and Rubicon a son of imported Rayon d'Or, traces 
through another branch, viz.: Flageolet, Plutus, 
Trumpeter, Orlando, son of Touchstone. Commando, 
the premier sire of the United States in 1907 (sire 
of the unbeaten Colin and Peter Pan) is by Domino 
who also traces direct to imported Eclipse, son of 
Orlando. 

Rey El Santa Anita, who stands fourth in this list, 
is a son of Cheviot (imp.) the full brother to Sir 
Modred, a descendant of Herod through Traducer, 
The Libel, Pantaloon, etc. 

Kismet, fifth in the list, is a tail male descendant 
of Stockwell, and his dam Kisberina by the Derby 
winner Kisber, traces to the celebrated Queen Mary. 

Solitaire (imp.) by Ayreshire, dam Solesky by 
Thunder, Bruce Lowe figure 12, heads the list of 
money winners, and number of winners. He is owned 
by A. B. Spreckels, Napa Stock Farm. 

Canopus (imp.) by Sheen, clam Charmian by 
Galopln or Bertram, is second in regard to the 
amount of money won by his get. He is owned by 
John Mackay, Woodland, Cal. 

Rubicon by Rayon d*Or, dam Lilly R. by Glenelg, 
is third in the list of moneys won, but leads in the 
number of races won by his get. He is owned by 
E. Lannigan, San Francisco. 

Rey El Santa Anita by Cheviot (imp.), dam Aloha 
by Grinstead, is fourth in the list, and is owned by 
E. J. Baldwin of Los Angeles. 

Kismet (imp.) by Melton, dam Kisberina by 
Kisber, is fifth in the list. He is owned by the Es- 
tate of C. Kerr, Antrim Stock Farm, Bakersfield. 

The totals show that 78 stallions, owned and 
standing for service in California and Nevada, sired 
281 winners of 807 races in the United States and 
Canada, in 1907. The total value of the first moneys 
won amounts to $294,345, no account being taken of 
second or third moneys. The list follows: 









Races 






Winners. 


Won. 


Ami Won. 


1 


Solitaire (Imp.) 


15 


44 


$23,465 


2 


Canopus (Imp.) .... 


9 


45 


18,310 


3 


Rubicon 


12 


47 


15,555 


4 


Rey El Santa Anita. 


12 


30 


15,415 


5 


Kismet limp.) 


12 


32 


12,365 


6 


Brutus (Imp.) 


13 


37 


12,145 


7 


Altamax 


14 


36 


11,255 


8 


St. Carlo 


10 


29 


10,660 


9 


St. Avonicus (Imp.). 


12 


29 


9,075 


10 


Eddie Jones 


6 


25 


8,515 


11 


Orsini 


7 


19 


8,395 


12 


Salvado 


3 


21 


7,575 


13 


Herald 


4 


21 


6,675 


14 


Prestonpans (Imp.).. 


2 


4 


6,595 


15 


David Tenny 


4 


13 


5,695 


16 


Piccolo (Imp.) 


4 


18 


5,600 


17 


St. Symphorien (Imp.) 


6 


14 


5,505 


18 


Galveston ( Imp.) .... 


8 


15 


5,140 


19 


Col. Wheeler 


5 


16 


5,025 


20 


Rey del Sierras 


3 


14 


4,755 


21 


Magnet 


4 


14 


4,625 


22 


Borgia 


3 


13 


4,565 


23 


Salvation 


3 


12 


4,210 


24 


Nephew 


2 


14 


4,150 


25 


Figaro 


4 


13 


4,125 


26 


Ormonde (Imp.) 


2 


11 


4,025 


27 


Ravelston 


2 


12 


4,020 


28 


Marius (Imp.) 


6 


9 


3,835 


29 


Amigo 


6 


11 


3,475 


30 


Blomsbury 


3 


11 


3,375 


31 


Yellow Tail 


3 


6 


3,145 


32 


Sombrero 


2 


8 


3,070 


33 


Vesuvian 


3 


12 


3,070 


34 


Bedeck 


4 


10 


3,015 


35 


San Juan 


1 


5 


2,390 


36 


Crescendo 


4 


9 


2,350 


37 


Captive 


3 


8 


2,300 


38 


Paladin (Imp.) 


2 


7 


2,235 


39 


Tarcoola (Imp.) .... 


2 


7 


2,225 


40 


Puryear D 


2 


5 


2,175 


41 


Emperor of Norfolk... 


6 


7 


2,125 


42 


Jackson 


1 


6 


1,825 


43 


Libertine 


Q 


5 


1,575 


44 


Cromwell 


4 


6 


1,450 


45 


Horatio 


2 


5 


1,425 


46 


Sir Hampton 


2 


3 


1,415 


47 


Crighton (Imp.) .... 


2 


4 


1,300 


48 


Ducat 


O 


4 


1,275 


49 


The Judge 


1 


4 


1,275 


50 


Nomad 


1 


4 


1,200 


51 


Moreno 


2 


3 


975 


52 


All Green 


2 


3 


950 


53 


Yankee Doodle 


1 


3 


925 


54 


Wernberg 


2 


3 


900 


55 


Friar Tuck 


1 


3 


825 


56 


Edinborough 


1 


4 


800 


57 


Joe Ripley 


1 


3 


800 


58 


Joe Terry 


1 


1 


745 


59 




1 


2 


695 


60 




2 


2 


640 


61 


EI Rio Rey 


2 


2 


625 



62 


Reggy (Imp.) 


1 


2 


600 


63 


Salvable 


1 


3 


600 


64 


Yo El Rev 


1 


2 


400 


65 


Ostler Joe 


1 


2 


400 


66 


Trappean 


i 


1 


325 


67 


Roval Flush 


i 


1 


325 


68 


Abalanzor 


i 


1 


325 


69 


Satsuma 


i 


1 


325 


70 


Tempo 


i 


1 


325 


71 


Geo. F. Smith 


. i 


1 


325 


72 


General Miles 


i 


1 


300 


73 


Oscar 


i 


1 


200 


7-1 


Gano 


i 


1 


200 


75 


The Weaver 


i 


1 


200 


76 


Kenilworth 


i 


1 


200 


77 


Mariner (Imp.) 


i 


1 


150 


78 


Piccolo or Borgia 


i 


3 


975 


79 


Crescendo or Brioso.. 


i 


1 


325 



o 

NEW LEASE OF RIVERSIDE TRACK. 



Riverside, January 10. — At the annual meeting of 
the Riverside Driving Association a new set of offi- 
cers was elected and the threatened disruption of 
the association and the discontinuance of horse 
racing in Riverside was settled for good. The rac- 
ing grounds which were owned by Eugene F. Binder 
were purchased by L. Fotter for $5000 and the asso- 
ciation has leased the grounds and buildings from 
Mr. Fotter for $500 per year. 

Mr. Binder was for many years the backer and 
shining light in horse racing in this city, but of late 
the interest in the sport died down considerably and 
after the Thanksgiving races Mr. Binder announced 
that he would closes the grounds unless some one 
would either lease them or buy them outright. Mr. 
Fotter came to the rescue, having always had great 
interest in the sport and now horse racing will be 
continued with monthly meets and the association 
is already making plans for a big meet on Febru- 
ary 22. 

o 

THE ORIGINAL COPPERBOTTOM PACER. 



Joseph Battell, author of the Morgan Horse and 
Register, is authority for the statement that the 
original Copperbottom, founder of the pacing family 
of that name in Kentucky, was bred by David Blunt, 
of Danville, Vt., foaled in 1809, and was a son of 
the original Justin Morgan. Copperbottom was taken 
with his dam to Bolton, P. Q., in 1810, where Mr. 
Blunt settled permanently. He was sold to a Mr. 
Jewett or Jowett, and went to Kentucky by the way 
of Montreal and Detroit in 1816. 

This was probably the horse that is registered 
in Wallace's American Trotting Register, Volume 
2, page 163, as Jowett's Copperbottom. Nothing is 
said of the color of this Copperbottom either by 
Mr Wallace or Mr. Battell. The prevailing color 
of the most noted members of the Copperbottom 
family was roan. This is an unusual color in the 
Morgan family, but has been known to exist and 
be perpetuated with as much uniformity as in the 
Copperbottom family. Esty's Black-Hawk, a son 
of Vermont Black-Hawk was a roan horse, and it 
was from him, by way of his daughter Lady Frank- 
lin 2:29%, that one of the noted sons of George 
Wilkes, Jay Bird, inherited the roan color, which he 
transmitted and perpetuated with as much uniformity 
and through as many generations as did any of the 
Copperbottom stallions. 

The first Copperbottom stallion that is registered 
as roan was Fenwick's Copperbottom. His sire was 
Brutus, a son of Jowett's Copperbottom. The color 
of Brutus is not given in the Register, but it is 
probable that he may have been a gray roan, for 
his dam was by the thoroughbred Robin Grey, a 
gray horse, whose color was probably inherited from 
his dam, that was a daughter of Grey Diomed, a 
gray son of imported Medley. The latter was gray 
and so was his sire, Gimcrack, and so was Gim- 
crack's sire, Cripple, by Godolphin Arabian. — Ameri 
can Horse Breeder. 

o 

WOODLAND HAS A FAST COLT, TOO. 



Woodland, January 20, 1908. 

Mr. Editor: I see by the Breeder and Sportsman 
that Mr. Ted Hayes of Los Angeles has a very fast 
colt by Bon Voyage. He surely is a dandy. Any nine- 
months'-old colt that can trot a quarter in 43*4 sec- 
onds is certainly great. Bon Voyage is bound to be 
a great sire. My Bon Voyage colt, out of Carrie 
Malone, steps to suit me. I have three Iran Altos 
nine months' old, and have never timed any of them, 
but they are the best lot of colts I ever broke, and 
all show well. Let me say right here that if Mr. 
Hayes were here with his colt, or anyone else with 
a nine-months'-old trotter they could win a $40 suit 
of clothes if they could beat the Iran Alto colt. 

H. S. HOGOHOOM. 
o 

The wonderful hold harness racing has on the 
public is shown by the increasing attention which 
the big fair associations pay to this branch of sport. 
The average American citizen dearly loves to see 
a speed contest between horses, and he shows his 
love by paying for admittance to the grandstand 
where he may indulge his love for it. There is not 
a big fair association in the country that has made 
harness racing a feature that would consider a pro- 
position to replace it with some other form of sport 
or feature. Increased purses for the harness horses 
and larger grandstands for the spectators are what 
the directors of most of the big fair associations 
are considering at present. — Horse World. 



VETERINARY EDUCATION. 



A few evenings ago Lieutenant Governor Harper, 
speaking in the college chapel, referred to veteri- 
narians as "horse doctors." There was nothing un- 
usual about this, but being a veterinarian and hav- 
ing the opportunity, I proceeded to criticise this at- 
titude of the public toward the modern veterinarian. 

In a general way, the educated veterinarian of 
character and ability is at last receiving the patron- 
age and recognition which he so justly deserves. 
It is only occasionally a lapse of this kind occurs. 
It is with a feeling of wholesome pride and real 
satisfaction that several prominent veterinarians of 
this State are regularly invited to read scientific 
papers before medical associations; others have been 
elected honorary members of such societies; two 
or three are aldermen of their respective cities. 
The veterinarian will receive due recognition and 
will be respected as a member of society and a 
citizen of influence just as soon as by his attain- 
ments, socially and otherwise, he satisfies the public 
that such recognition is justified. 

The State Board of Agriculture, in control of the 
Colorado Agricultural College, has created a Veteri- 
nary College. Under the new regime this school 
had a most auspicious beginning and the work is 
progressing satisfactorily. It is the only school of 
the kind between San Francisco and Manhattan, 
Kansas. Notwithstanding the fact that the matricu- 
lation requirement of high-school graduation is a step 
in advance of other veterinary schools in America 
(with two exceptions), yet we have enrolled thirty- 
four students, and could not, without much incon- 
venience, accommodate more students during the 
present year. 

In one particular this course of study is to be 
looked upon as entirely different from others. In 
the ordinary vocations of life a question is seldom 
asked about a man's preparation for his life work 
whether within college walls or without — it simply 
remains for him to make good; he must deliver 
the message to Garcia. In the profession of medicine 
it is quite different, for here he is judged by his 
co-workers uncompromisingly, according to the repu- 
tation of the school from which he receives his de- 
gree. The limited course in veterinary science in 
vogue at the college three years ago was dropped 
none too soon. Several young men having completed 
the two-year course there and having been gradu- 
ated from reputable veterinary colleges with honors 
one year later found themselves in an awkward 
predicament in not being eligible to the civil service 
examinations, or to the American Veterinary Medical 
Association. The requirement for good standing in 
this connection, among other things, is a bona fide 
attendance of two years in a recognized veterinary 
college. At that time we made no pretention of 
maintaining a regular veterinary school (not grant- 
ing a degree), and while our graduates did the col- 
lege, as well as themselves, much credit by winning 
special honors, yet they were caught by a technical- 
ity and were without standing, having spent only 
one year in a recognized veterinary college. 

The veterinary science department of the Colorado 
Agricultural College, has now been launched as a 
full-fledged veterinary college, and we shall need to 
look to our educational standing that we may com- 
pare favorably with other schools. A high standard 
will be maintained in order to insure recognition 
for our graduates. To rank among the accredited 
schools of the Uuited States we must have at least 
four qualified veterinarians on the faculty and a 
term of three years of six months each year. The 
curriculum must be satisfactory and the subjects 
taught with a degree of efficiency beyond question. 
The equipment must be ample and a large clinic is 
indispensable. These conditions have all been met. 
There are twenty faculty members, six of whom are 
veterinarians, two physicians, and among the rest 
are such men as Carlyle, Gillette, Headden, Pad- 
dock — men of national reputation in their specialties. 
The hospital is full most of the time. The equip- 
ment is already fair and will be made first-class in 
every detail. 

The college term is nine months each during three 
years, making twenty-seven months in all instead of 
eighteen, as required. The number of students en- 
rolled matters little to us, but we are much con- 
cerned about giving our students the best possible 
advantages, to the end that by their gentlemanly 
bearing they may be a credit to their alma mater. 

To raise the standard of veterinary science in 
this country it must be evident to all that bigh- 
BChool graduation is the first requisite of a secure r 
foundation; the next is a cultural training that goes 
with a thorough knowledge of the art and science 
of veterinary medicine and surgery. In this way 
only can our profession ever expect to aspire to the 
dignity, the respect, and station in life to which its 
nobility and importance justly entitle it. — Geo. H. 
Glover, Professor of Veterinary Science, Colorado 
Agricultural College, Fort Collins. 

o 

The new government breeding farm at Weybridge, 
Vt., established for the purpose of perpetuating the 
Morgan horse, is nearly completed. The government 
has expended $25,000 on the station, and a further 
appropriation will be asked from Congress. All the 
buildings are lighted by electricity and heated by 
steam: About 40 Morgan horses have been placed 
on the farm, among them the stallion General Gates, 
which cost $4,000. The station will be under the 
direct supervision of the Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry of the Department of Agriculture. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 



i 
i 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT 



i 

? 

i 



TO DEVELOP RIFLE AND REVOLVER 
MANSHIP. 



MARKS- 



According to an article in the Los Angeles Times an 
important movement is projected that will, if properly 
fostered, result in an incalculable advantage to de- 
votees of rifle and revolver shooting, in fact, the 
good accomplished by Southern California marksmen 
in this respect will be of exceeding practically bene- 
fit by precept and example to sportsmen and target 
enthusiasts of the whole Coast. The territory which 
it is proposed to utilize in the development exploited 
below could hardly be more congenial. This, added 
to favorable climatic and topographical conditions, 
should enable those connected actively with the or- 
ganization proposed to place the auxiliary force of 
riflemen and scouts on a plane of efficiency that 
would make a contemplated force of this character 
a formidable factor should the occasion arise for 
active field service. Aside from this, it is to be 
hoped, remote contingency, there is the opportunity 
for a series of unsurpassed outings in a country 
second to none on this mundane sphere. The chance 
to acquire a healthful training of body! a quick eye 
and skill with modern firearms that is afforded in 
but a few favored places. It will be remembered 
that practically the Boer army was made up of just 
such material and in about the same system of or- 
ganization as is contemplated here. What they did 
in the field made history in the art of modern warfare 
— it is true that the Boers finally succumbed, but not 
until they were starved into submission by over- 
whelming numbers. They did not have a thickly 
populated country and innumerable lines of communi- 
cation behind them as a base for support and sup- 
plies. 

What has been accomplished with the American 
rifle and revolver has made history and changed the 
manufacture and style of firearms the world over. 
Every effort to perpetuate and increase the high 
standard of American firearms and marksmanship 
should receive the unanimous and generous support 
of the Federal Government, the State and the com- 
monwealth. 

Expert riflemen, pistol shots, and horsemen of 
Southern California are forming an organization which 
has for its object the development of marksman- 
ship for the defense of the Southern California Coast 
line and frontier from foreign foes, if any should 
ever attempt invasion of the country. 

With this object in view, the organization proposes 
to conduct target practice and schools of horseman- 
ship. Membership is solicited not only from men 
who are expert with the rifle and revolver and in 
horsemanship, but those who are thoroughly familiar 
with the topography and characteristics of the coun- 
try, who may act as scouts and guides. 

This body of gun fighters and riders, which will 
be known as the Southern California Rifles, is to 
be formed into companies of sharpshooters, scouts 
and couriers to volunteer in an independent semi- 
military capacity under orders of the Federal Gov- 
ernment in time of war, for defense against a foreign 
foe only. 

The organization will construct a chain of rifle 
ranges from Balboa, below Long Beach, to a point 
above Santa Monica, and at strategic points in the 
passes and roads leading to Los Angeles. These 
ranges may be turned into rifle pits and points of de- 
fense immediately if war is declared. 

Auxiliary to these ranges signal stations and 
routes of rapid transit for horsemen are to be lo- 
cated, especially in places where there are no tele- 
phone or telegraph and railway connections. 

In this way it is proposed to map out the city 
and surrounding country into a strategic military dis- 
trict merely for training facilities at this time, but 
subject to the approval of the Department of War 
in case of hostilities. 

Active measures for the permanent organization 
of such a body of home guards were taken last week, 
and a temporary organization was formed, to be 
made permanent by the election of a set of officers 
at a meeting scheduled for Washington's Birthday. 
Meanwhile, those temporarily in charge have adopted 
41 set of by-laws to be in force until permanent or- 
ganization is effected. 

Officers elected to serve until such time are: W. 
H. Leonard, president; Arthur Loring MacKaye, vice- 
president; C. Harvey-Elder, secretary; George O. 
Spurrier, assistant secretary; Ross Dunlap, treasurer; 
O. S. Lowsley, Dr. F. C. Shurtleff, directors; the 
whole body to constitute the board of control, tem- 
porarily. 

As soon as possible a rifle range will be located 
at some accessible beach point, where target practice 
may be indulged in, as by any rifle club. Instead 
of the regulation bullseye targets of rifle clubs, the 
military manikin in the shape and size of a man will 
be substituted. These will be placed at various 
ranges. The targets will be made of some perforable 
metal, such as tin, or reinforced wood. Each bullet 
hole will be numbered, and a catalogue of statistics 
kept, showing what each man did in practice. When 
shot full of holes, the target will be preserved at 
headquarters as a trophy and placed on exhibition. 



Targets patterned after every conceivable method 
of attack will be arranged. For instance, moving 
targets, manipulated on wires at a speed varying 
from a walk to the double-time or charge; boat tar- 
gets on water, in which a boatload of target soldiers 
will be drawn to shore from a given distance by 
wire, and the object of the sharpshooters will be 
to perforate every target at least once in a given 
distance or time, or to sink the boat, which will be 
of a cheap material constructed for the purpose. In 
these two forms of target shooting, squad firing 
will be in order, as it would be impossible to keep 
a record of individual work. 

Such wood be the work of the sharpshooters. The 
scouts and couriers will be held in reserve to carry 
dispatches, scout the country and act as a mobile 
body of sharpshooters. 

To secure practice beneficial for such a purpose, 
a series of suspended or moving targets could be 
arranged in the formation of a military force, and 
the mounted troops could charge by, emptying car- 
bines or revolvers. If every target is perforated the 
troops would have made a perfect score, and records 
of the results could be kept. 

The couriers would be able t» act as signalmen 
and wigwag their messages by flags or mirrors, by 
smoke columns as did the Indians, by fires at night, 
or by delivering dispatches in person. 

Co the main, it is the purpose that the sharpshoot- 
ers and scouts shall act, not in troop or company 
maneuvers, but from a thin, invisible skirmish line 
to harass the enemy as much as possible. 

It is believed by those originating the project 
that not only will these general plans furnish excel- 
lent sport in the way of target practice and outings, 
but that an efficient fighting body always will be 
at hand at a moment's notice to defend the homes 
and lives of Southern Californians against attack. 

In order to give the general public as large a 
share as possible in the scheme, it is proposed to 
hold periodical tournaments at a given location at 
the seashore at which sham battles can be fought — 
real fighters with ball cartridges arrayed against 
targets cleverly manipulated by wires or other me- 
chanical contrivances, scoring the "hits" so that 
the watching thousands may see and applaud. Such 
an exhibition could be distinctly Californian and be 
made a gala affair. 

No dues are attached to the membership. Each 
man is to own his own rifle and equipment. No par- 
ticular pattern of arms is required, hut it is recom- 
mended that the United States service arm be used 
wherever possible. Effectiveness is the first requi- 
site. If a man can hit a target with a 30-40 Win- 
chester better than with the new Springfield, he may 
have the use of that arm, unless the Federal Gov- 
ernorment should deem it advisable to furnish the 
service arm free to the sharpshooter. 

If expenses are incurred, the organization proposes 
to raise the amount by subscription among the mem- 
bers; if that is not sufficient, public subscriptions or 
entertainments may be resorted to. The idea is 
to make a patriotic movement of the whole scheme 
so that every man will bear his own expenses in 
so far as fares, ammunition, guns, uniforms and other 
equipment used by him alone are concerned. Extra- 
ordinary expenses, such as targets, etc., are to be 
provided for in some other way. 

For the present only executive officers are to 
serve. Later, when the organization takes on a more 
military aspect, field officers are to be selected who 
shall serve in case of hostilities, and in an honorary 
capacity prior to that time. Meanwhile the exe- 
cutive officers are to serve as a board of control. 

Until actual service calls, there will be no non- 
commissioned officers. The men will rank in squads 
according to their shooting skill, thus no man being 
held above another except as competitive contests 
of skill give him honorary precedence. In times 
where authority is necessary, petty officers may be 
appointed by the field officers. 

Thus the organization will take on the aspect of 
a rifle and revolver club, but the potential power for 
instant service will be latent and ready to spring 
to life at the call to arms. 

A general idea is to form a body of men available 
for military service if need be, skilled in the use of 
firearms and in horesmansihp rather than in field 
maneuvers, yet free of that military restraint and 
drilling, which is odious and impossible to the ma- 
jority of business and professional men. 

The organization is to be distinctive of Southern 
California, and its identity must remain centered 
in Los Angeles. In case of war primarily the ob- 
ject is to defend Los Angeles and the surrounding 
territory. Members only join with that end in view. 
However, if the Federal Government so desires it 
may call on the body as a whole or as individuals 
for service beyond its territory, but reorganization 
of the body must be effected, as an auxiliary of the 
parent body, or the members may be absorbed into 
a regular Federal military organization individually. 
The only requirements for general membership will 
be allegiance to the United States Government and 
a promise to join in the defense of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 



The advice and services of military engineers are 
to be sought to map out the entire country about 
Los Angeles on a military basis. Points of vantage 
will be charted; first, second, third and possibly 
more lines of defense planned, and points marked 
where rifle pits and other defenses may be located. 

All the plans as laid out and adopted are to be laid 
before the War Department and the entire force 
placed at its services. If the department cares to 
make suggestions, they will be adopted; if the Fed- 
eral Army or officers of the War Department desire 
to assume command the organization is placed at 
their disposal in Southern California, and the mem- 
bers will serve as special volunteers. 

Should war with a foreign power be declared, the 
organization will immediately place itself at the ser- 
vice of the Federal Government. No military action 
shall be undertaken without direct orders from the 
Government. Without permission from the Federal 
authorities the organization will be powerless to act 
in any offensive or defensive capacity whatsoever. 

The applicants for membership shall be classified 
relative to their marksmanship, horsemanship and 
equipment. No application of an able bodied white 
man of good character will be refused. If without 
skill or equipment, he may have his name enrolled 
for service on call. The names then will be classified 
accordingly. 

It will be a prime purpose of the organization 
thereafter to advance its members in equipment and 
efficiency. To this end instructors will be appointed 
from the skilled members, while assistance will be 
rendered in securing arms and equipment and in their 
expert manipulation. 

The classes suggested are: 

Class A — Men skilled above a certain percentage 
and fully equipped. 

Class A-l — Men skilled above a certain percentage 
and unequipped. 

Class B — Men familiar with the use of arms though 
not experts, and fully equipped. 

Class B-l — Men familiar with the use of arms 
though not experts, and unequipped. 

Class C — Men unfamiliar with arms but fully 
equipped. 

Class D — Men without equipment and without 
knowledge of arms. 



-o- 



WILD FOWL IN LAKE OF CRATER. 



A climb up the thinly-greened sides of grim old 
Diamond Head, near Honolulu, H. I., is well worth 
while these days , writes a sportsman sojourning in 
the Pacific Isles at present, for, beside the 
magnificent view obtainable from the crater's 
rim, there is a lake of quite respectable dimensions 
inside. 

Last summer there was no lake in the crater. The 
soil was a little damper in the lowest part and the 
grass grew lushly, that was all. 

The recent rains have formed the lake, which is 
about three-quarters of a mile in circumference. 
The depth a short way from the edges is about two 
and a half feet. 

Here and there in the lake the top branches of 
mimosa are seen. Near the water-line a thicket 
of glue bushes and algarobas extends clear around, 
through which, on account of the thorns, a way is 
with difficulty made. 

It is a curious fact that the thicket ends where 
the water-line begins; this is undoubtedly due to 
the regular presence of water in the bottom of the 
crater in past years. 

In the early morning wild duck may be found in 
the lake and several have been shot of late. The 
birds come in about sundown and leave for their 
feeding-grounds soon after dawn. Shooting ducks 
in a crater is a form of sport which would appeal 
to even a veteran sportsman. 

There are several coots in the lake at present, 
glossy blue-black fellows, with gray, flanged feet, 
a white fleshy plate on the top of the head and a 
white bill. Very wary are these birds, keeping well 
out into the middle of the water. A shot will drive 
them to the shelter of the bushes, however, and 
there, if craftily stalked, a shot may occasionally 
be obtained at them. 

The flesh of these crater coots is sweet and suc- 
culent. The crops of two, which were opened, last 
week, were filled with some kind of green weed. 
One of the birds was in an early stage of egg-pro- 
duction. 

Wading along the edge of the lake is treacherous 
work, for mud-holes abound and a person is up to 
his neck in mud of a particularly holding descrip- 
tion before he realizes what has happened. 

For a tour of exploration of the crater the coarsest, 
strongest clothes possible should be worn, otherwise 
the flesh of the wearer will assuredly be scratched 
and lacerated by the mimosa and algaroba thorns. 

The hut of the lone settler who last year made his 
abode in Diamond Head has long been deserted 
and is fast going to rack and ruin, and the weeds 
have sprung up and hidden almost every evidence 
of his precarious husbandry. 

o : 

George Wesley was fined $25 for killing deer out 
of season by Judge Brown of Kennett. Wesley, to- 
gether with William Sisk and John Lancaster, were 
arrested by Deputy Game Wardens Carpenter and 
Birmingham at Pitt. The cases against the other 
two were dismissed, as the men only had deer meat 
and hides in their possession. Wesley demanded a 
jury trial, but changed his mind at the last moment 
and pleaded guilty. 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE B.ilEEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



SQUIRREL AND RABBIT SHOOTING. 



Now that the ducks and quail will soon be out of 
seaosn and nothing but snipe are left to interest the 
the scattergunner, sportsmen are turning to the 
little rifle for companionship on occasional day's 
outings in the country. Few who have never pos- 
sessed one realize what an amount of sport can be 
had with a 22-caliber repeater of any standard make, 
and for a very trifling outlay. Shotgun ammunition 
costs money, but a 22-caliber can be fed liberally all 
day for a small amount. 

Game for the small rifle is ever plentiful. The 
ground sqirrel affords the best of marks. Some 
places more numerous than in others, he is always 
to be had, and a trip into the country adjacent to 
most points will put the shooter into good game 
country, so far as the needs of his small rifle are 
concerned. 

Although not generally known, except among the 
Chinese, the common ground squirrel is very well 
flavored when fat, and if taken young, is tender as 
well. His flavor when fed on barley and weed seeds 
is fully equal to that of rabbit, and, if anything, 
a little more delicate. He is prepared the same 
way, the greatest drawback being the difficulty of 
skinning him, which is easier if performed at once. 
The 22 short cartridge is ample sufficient for squir- 
rels. In hunting ground squirrels with a rifle con- 
siderable fun is to be had shooting off matches. A 
dozen squirrels is a good day's bag, no matter how 
plentiful they may happen to be, owing to the tend- 
ency of the animals to get to their holes, however 
badly wounded. Only a head or chest shot seems to 
be able to stop them on the spot, and in shooting 
them it is well to hold on the eye, for only squirrels 
in the hand can be counted at the finish. 

Picking off "soldiers" sitting upright on the edge 
of their holes at a hundred yards is not beyond the 
powers of the 22 gun, and some pretty shots can be 
pulled off occasionally at them on the run. The 
game is well worth the trying. 

Another pleasing variety of small rifle hunting 
is the pursuit of rabbits. Jacks can be shot on the 
run by a capable marksman, but he must be of the 
"up and coming" sort to accomplish anything at such 
a difficult game. 

On a rabbit warren which are plentiful in many 
localities, a good shot can secure half a dozen in an 
afternoon, if conditions be right. The rabbits hole 
up on a man's approach, but show curiosity, and gen- 
erally expose a pair of ears and a bright, shining eye 
if the hunter stands still. A quick shot aimed an 
inch below the junction of those ears generally 
resurrects bunny and gathers the material for a 
delicious stew. 

Driving along country roads in the evening is 
another good way to shoot rabbits. They sometimes 
offer ridiculously easy shots, and can be knocked 
over with ease by a novice. Occasionally they will 
stand for a clean miss without blinking an eye, and 
allow a chance to send another bullet to its billet. 

In a few weeks most of the female rabbits will 
be busy with their most serious business of bringing 
offspring into the world, but the bucks are just as 
good now as in midwinter. In this country they 
breed more or less the year around, and one who 
held off shooting them on that account would not 
kill very many rabbits. 

Crows, hawks, some owls, blackbirds, are all legi- 
timate game for the small rifle. It is surprising 
what a lot of things a man can find to shoot at in the 
course of a day's rambling over hill and dale with a 
rifle. 

The range and killing power of a good 22-caliber 
rifle are generally underestimated. They are effect- 
ive at a hundred yards, and a good shot can do con- 
sidrable execution with them at a greater distance. 
Some of the trick feats that can be performed by 
a good shot with one are little less than marvelous. 

o 

A NORTHWEST HUNTING GROUND. 



Isolated and remote from the whirl and noise of 
civilization is the Elk River valley, in the south- 
eastern part of the Kootenay district of British 
Columbia, north-east of Spokane, which to-day is 
declared by seasoned sportsmen to be one of the 
most prolific and varied big game ranges on the 
American continent. Elk roam the valley in bands 
of hundreds and beaver have colonized in thousands. 
This is due in a large measure to the restrictions 
adopted by the provincial government and the ex- 
cellent grazing range afforded. Elk and beaver 
have been protected since 1905 and the close season 
will continue until 1911. 

R. L. Laird of Spokane, who has explored parts 
of the valley, declares that the measure of protec- 
tion afforded the big game in the preserve has not 
been half-hearted; in fact, he adds, it is the belief 
of government officials, guides and others familiar 
with the district, that the law has been strictly ob- 
served with the result that elk and beaver, bear, 
deer, goats, mountain sheep and other fur-bearing 
animals have increased and are to-day probably 
more abundant than at any other period within 
the last half century. Mr. Laird said in describing 
the country: 

"Elk river rises a couple of hundred miles north 
of the Crows' Nest branch of the Canadian Pacific 
railroad and runs in a general way due south to 
that line, finding its way ultimately into the Koote- 
nay river, which in turn feeds the Columbia river. 
Prom the town of Michal, an important coal mining 
community and the outfitting point for the upper 



Elk river country, the valley stretches eight to 
ten miles wide and is abundantly watered by the 
swift Elk river, literally alive with the gamiest 
trout that ever fought for a piscator's fly. On the 
uplands are thousands of acres of grazing land, cov- 
ered with a thick growth of grass resembling the 
•prairie wool' which makes the cattle ranges of 
Alberta and Saskatchewan unrivalled, horses prefer- 
ring it to timothy. This grass cures itself and affords 
an ideal range for elk, goats and big horn sheep. 

"For countless years the valley of the Elk was 
a famous hunting ground for Indians, the aborigines 
of the hills and prairies gathering there annually 
to restock their larders for the winter. When the 
white man arrived and began his usual tactics with 
regard to the beaver and elk the game dwindled 
rapidly, and there was grave danger of the extinc- 
tion of both varieties. Realizing this the govern- 
ment declared a long close season and the game 
secured a fresh lease of life. Energetic game 
wardens have succeeded in keeping the Indians 
out of the valley, while the guides and trappers have 
co-operated in the preservation of protected game, 
realizing that when the close season lapses the im- 
portance of the district as a big game range will 
bring them a golden harvest. 

"It is expected that sportsmen will be restricted 
to one bull elk annually after 1911, while a further 
close eseason may be declared for beaver. At last 
the nature-lover who desires to study the habits 
of beaver at close range can satisfy himself to the 
full. The elk have become careless and indifferent 
to visitors, and parties entering the country com- 
monly encounter bands of elk, which manifest but 
slight disposition to waive the right of way on the 
trails. 

"The highlands of Elk river valley are ideal 
ranges for mountain goats and the famous big horn 
sheep. These can be found at any time within a 
day's march from camp, although, as elsewhere, 
the matter of shooting either variety depends whol- 
ly upon the sportsman's skill as a stalker and 
taxes the expert's experience and endurance. Sev- 
eral experienced guides may be found at Michel 
with well equipped pack trains, and the outfitting 
point is best reached from Spokane." 

o 

HUNTING IN THE ANTIPODES. 

The following is a word picture of sport in Queens- 
land as contributed by the London correspondent 
of the Queensland Herald: — Imagine a sportsman 
out with his gun on the Queensland plain. A couple 
of miles away a line of eight or nine black dots 
apprises him that a flock of emus is in sight. If 
he is without a stout dog it is not much use to 
gallop after them; but, being a new arrival, he is 
sure to put his horse into a canter and prepare for 
the chase. The emu's chief weakness is curiosity, 
and the birds will run round uneasily as he ap- 
proaches, stopping now and then to regard his 
movements with a timid uncertainty. If he reins 
in and stands motionless, they will probably circle 
round him with great swiftness, coming within 
twenty or thirty yards, so that he can see the startled 
expression of their large eyes and admire the won- 
derful grace of their movements before they finally 
turn and continue their flight beyond the horizon. 
As he rides along he will see the plain turkey or 
Australian bustard warily watching him as it slides 
away through the grass or spreads its great wings 
to look for grasshoppers at a safer distance. This bird 
is excellent eating, weighing -as much as 20 pounds. 
It is in great abundance on the Western plains. 
The scrubs on the coast-side of the range also yield 
the sportsman excellent bags of great variety. 
There are many varieties of pigeons, the wonga and 
the gorgeous painted pigeon being the most prized. 
As our sportsman pushes his way through the thick 
tangle of undergrowth and creepers, he is possibly 
surprised to come upon a freshly-made mound four 
or five feet in height, and from fifteen to twenty feet 
in circumference. His first impression may be that 
in this tumulus reposes some native, chief, his bow 
and spear beside him, secluded in death from a civili- 
zation so fatal to his race. He will be astonished 
to learn that this is a bird's nest. The scrub turkey, 
an excellent table bird, rather smaller than the 
fowl-yard specimen, constructs this great mound in 
which to deposit its eggs, which are hatched by the 
sun. 

o 

Salt Water Angling. — Monterey bay can always 
be depended upon for good fishing by the devotees 
of salt-water angling, a report this week, although, 
commercial in its import, is of interest to anglers 
generally and is to the effect that the few fishermen 
remaining unemployed at present have suddenly 
found something to keep them moving for a short 
time at least, by the appearance in the bay of a large 
run of all varieties of fish in both the shell and finny 
articles. The bay is fairly teeming with sardines 
and big catches of mackerel, flounders, sole, cod, 
yellowtail, halibut and some salmon have been made. 
Sea lions also are plentiful and are causing de- 
struction in cutting the nets and allowing the escape 
of many of the most precious fish. As most of the 
fishing is accomplished with deep sea nets it is an 
easy matter for these troublesome sea animals to in- 
terfere with business and pleasure on the bay. Sun- 
day and Monday the bay and beach assumed a 
lively appearance, for many people took advantage 
of the extremely low tide and the plentitude of fish, 
which they were most successful in capturing. Aba- 
lones and mussels too, were plentiful and all who 
sought them were rewarded by a generous catch. 



DESTRUCTION OF SALT WATER FISH. 



John C. Wray, a Southern California salt water 
angler, who has made a close study of sea fishing 
and ocean food products, has the following to say 
regarding the wanton waste of food fishes, which 
prevails on the sea line of Los Angelas County: 

"Close observation during the past three years 
confirms me in the belief that tons upon tons of 
valuable food fish are wantonly destroyed annually 
in the district mentioned. In great measure faulty 
legislation is largely responsible for the killing and 
consequent loss of fish which have not reached 
commercial size, but which if allowed to mature 
would eventually take its place as a food product. 

"Comprehensive regulation of the size and char- 
acter of the seines used in deep sea fishing would 
save hundreds of tons of food annually. It is a 
fact which can not be disputed that Italian fisher- 
men are using small mesh nets that have been pro- 
hibited by the Italian government because of their 
killing qualities. 

"These nets are being used without fear or hind- 
rance in and about San Pedro, to the lasting dam- 
age to food fish interests. They are known as 
'blankets', killing anything and everything that can- 
not escape a quarter-inch mesh. 

"If to use these nets is a crime in Italian fisheries, 
why should they be allowed in California waters? 

"It is a fact that four of these nets have been im- 
ported from Italy, are in daily use, and are serving 
as originals from which copies are being made. 

"To their credit be it said that the better class 
of market fishermen refuse to use 'blankets' and 
are open in condemnation of their use. Market 
fishermen who have fished in these waters for years 
protest that the continuous use of 'blankets' and other 
nets of similar pattern by Italian and Japanese fisher- 
men will result in the total destruction of the 
fishing industry within the short period of from 
five to ten years. 

"The men who are using 'these fish-killers are, 
with one or two exceptions, foreign born fishermen 
who have no interest in the State of California or 
in the United States beyond the accumulation of 
dollars for their own personal benefit. 

"These men could not earn more than $2 a day in 
any other walk of life, yet because of faulty legis- 
lation they are piling up modest fortunes at the ex- 
pense of the fishing industry of the future. 

"It is a matter worthy of more than casual con- 
sideration that should these same foreign fishermen 
desire to take up land, say in the Antelope Valley, 
they must become citizens of the United States; 
while the immensely valuable fishing grounds ad- 
jacent to them are with practically no restrictions. 

"The Japanese fishermen, barred from citizenship, 
are today the recognized vandals of the fishing 
grounds, and are directly responsible for the dis- 
appearance of abalone and other shellfish which they 
have selected for their own special prey. 

"With no official figures at hand, I am unable to 
give the exact tonnage of meat and shells shipped 
out of this country by Japanese and Chinese fisher- 
men. I have in mind, however, one smart Jap 
fisherman who admitted to me that after seven 
years he had retired from the fishing field with more 
than $16,000 in American gold. 

"The result of the Japanese raid on the abalone 
is found in the fact that the coast line from San 
Diego to Port Harford has been practically denuded 
of this valuable food and shell product. The last 
legislature, aiming at the Japanese, prohibited the 
use of diving suits in abalone fishing. But well-in- 
formed fishermen insist that the prohibition is at 
least five years too late. It is an illustration of 
locking the stable door after the horse is stolen. 

"The rod and reel fisherman is the one who has in 
his power to arouse public sentiment against the 
wanton destruction of food fish as the Italian and 
Japanese market fishermen have no interest in the 
premises beyond the gathering of Yankee dollars. 

"As a case in point, I will cite an occurrence 
which came under my personal observation last fall. 
The market was glutted with barracuda and more 
market boats were due to arrive. Result: Eight 
hundred pounds of fine, fresh barrcuda dumped into 
the bay as food for the gulls. It was cheaper to go 
out for more than to ice them over night. 

"How long will a fishing ground last under such 
conditions, and what is the remedy for the exist- 
ing evils? First, the arousing of public sentiment 
against the use of fish-killing small-mesh nets. 
Second, the enactment of Federal or State laws 
which will place the alien market fishermen on a 
par with his brother who elect to acquire their live- 
lihood from the public domain. 

o 

Leather Cement. — A good glue for leather is recom- 
mended by the Sporting Goods -Dealer in the follow 
ing formula: Dissolve five parts of good glue or 
gelatine in 20 parts of acetic acid. Make a solution 
of 20 parts of mastic in an equal quantity of ether, 
add to it the solution of glue, and mix thoroughly by 
agitation. Finally dissolve 20 parts of gutta percha 
in 100 parts of carbon disulphide and to it add the 
foregoing mixture. We have made up a few drams 
of this cement and find it an excellent preparation, 
holding better than any we have yet tried. 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. , j 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 



A CATFISH PRESERVE. 



While not having a place in the list of game fishes, 
still the catfish has its uses, as well as abuses. 
As a food fish the "blue cat" is not to be despised; 
as a moderately exciting medium of sport for the 
lazy fisherman the catfish fills a niche peculiarly 
its own. When these fish are kept in a place where 
they can not do any damage to other varieties, 
they should be tolerated for more reasons than one, 
care should be taken, however, to avoid any possi- 
bility of their escape into adjacent waters. 

Monterey is liable to become famous for its fine 
cat fishing. Laguna del Rey, the lake in the Vista 
Del Rey tract, is just teeming with blue catfish. 

The species are the best of the catfish family, 
and were brought to that city by the Pacific Im- 
provement Company for the purpose of stocking the 
lage at Hotel Del Monte. 

They did well in the Del Monte lake, but propa- 
gated so fast they killed the black bass. For this 
reason it was decided to get rid of them. A couple 
of years ago the Del Monte Lake was dredged out 
for the purpose of removing the catfish. Tons and 
tons of the fish were taken out. 

.1. L. D. Roberts, the "father" of Seaside and who 
lets no opportunity pass to advance that thriving 
suburb, saw an opportunity to stock Laguna del 
Rey with fish. At his own expense he furnished a 
number of four-horse teams, and with these he hauled 
the catfish from the lake to the Seaside lagoon. 

Forty tons of these squirming fish were trans- 
ported, and to-day Laguna del Rey will furnish the 
finest cat fishing on the Pacific Coast. 

Driving along the bank of the lake thousands of 
the small catfish are to be seen, and out in the deep 
water fish weighing three and four pounds can be 
taken. 

The blue catfish is considered a great delicacy 
in the Eastern States. They are easy to catch, and 
when skinned and properly cooked are a most de- 
licious morsel. 

When the lake is turned into a pleasure resort, 
as the new owners of Vista del Rey intend to do, 
this squirming mass of water and fish will be an 
attraction that will draw thousands of visitors 
yearly. 

The name of the body of water should be changed 
to Roberts Lake in honor of the man who stocked 
it with fish. 

o 

Fly-Tying. 

Says a fishing contributor to a London sporting 
paper: "Ladies who 'find embroidery, poker-work, 
water-color painting, and the like, hobbies which 
are not only pleasing occupations for leisure hours, 
but on occasion profitable amusement too, might 
do worse than turn their attention to artificial fly- 
making. They will find it a most engaging pas- 
time, admirably suitable for deft feminine fingers; 
and a good fly-maker can add considerably to her 
pin-money by means of her amusement. Some of 
the finest artificial flies and similar lures ari made 
by women, and the process is not so difficult but 
that the dexterous amateur might derive both pleas- 
ure and profit from it. In America, several women 
gain quite respectable sums by fly-making. It is 
easy to get their angling friends to give them orders: 
and when once their skill becomes known to a few, 
it is not long before their fame spreads and their 
profits increase. Indeed, ladies in straitened circum- 
stances have been known to live almost entirely 
on the proceeds of their art; while their more fort- 
unate sisters can often make quite nice little sums 
to spend on trifles. At the least, they can add to 
the undying esteem of their sporting men-folk." 



Ducks Scattered by the Rains. 

Since the recent rains most of the ducks have 
deserted the South Bay country to the northward 
of Alviso, and are to be found in great numbers on 
the many inland pools formed by the heavy* showers 
of rain A week ago they were more plentiful on the 
South Bay than at any time this year. Teal were 
especially numerous; spoonbills, which have been 
conspicuous for their scarcity this winter, were be- 
ginning to make their appearance, and a few flocks 
of canvasbacks were coming from their northern 
haunts. Local hunters were making fine kills, but 
all of this was changed by the rains, causing the 
wary webfooted tribes to leave for fresh feeding 
grounds inland. 

Hunters around Gilroy and in Hall's Valley, and 
others who had easy access to large inland ponds, 
were especially benefited and made large kills. 
Shooting around Soap Lake and in the marshes to 
the southeast of Gilroy was very good, thousands 
of all kinds of ducks making their appearance there, 
among them being widgeon, canvasback and teal. 

A few canvasback, spoonbill and teal are still 
feeding on the marsh, but shooters returned with 
slim game bags, lately. 



More upland game birds were killed in Oregon in 
the season of 1907 than during any previous season, 
according to State Game Warden Beebe. Chinese 
pheasants have been particularly numerous. 

State Game Warden Beebe and County Game 
Warden Loomis disagree on the estimates of the 
season. Loomis has stated that fully 30.000 birds 
were killed in one county alone, but Beebe states 
that only about 10,000 of the game birds were killed 
in the entire State. 



Mr. E. W. Van Slyke, of Los Angeles, proposes 
to arrange with the Fish Commissioners for a trip 
to Mexico, after wild turkeys with which to stock 
the reserves of this State. He intends to go to the 
feeding grounds and at once commence the trapping 
of the fowls, which will be shipped to points in 
California early in March, which is believed to be 
the best season in which to turn them loose on 
their new range 



A number of Pomona sportsmen recently organ- 
ized the Rowley club, articles of incorporation be- 
ing drawn up, The purpose of the organization is to 
rent a tract of land on the Chico creek, which runs 
into the Santa Ana river near Rincon, for shooting 
purposes as a preserve. 

Local sportsmen have made several trips recently 
to the district and have found the ducks to be plen- 
tiful and the water and situation of the land 
wonderfully adapted for a preserve. 

Among the members are A. E. Tate, M. H. 
Potter, B. Chaffey Shepherd, E. P. White, Fiord 
George, J. Ransom Casey, Eugene Mclntire, George 
Hill, T. S. Newby. 

The preserve is a part of the Rowley property 
fomerly known as the Durkee ranch. 

o 

PACIFIC COAST TRIALS. 



Bakersfield, January 22, 1908. 

The Pacific Coast Field Trial Club's twenty-fifth 
annual field trials were started on the club trial 
grounds, about eight miles south-west of this city, 
on Monday morning. Weather conditions the first 
two days were exceedingly pleasant; this morning 
a heavy fog delayed the running until 10 o'clock. 

The winners of the Derby were: S. Christenson's 
English Setter dog St. Ives (Urtcle Jimmie White- 
stone-Belle Fontaine) first. J. G. Roberts' English 
Setter dog Boy Blue ( Rival-Lightheart) second. 
E. Courtney Ford's English Setter bitch Tiburon 
(Uncle Jimmie Whitestone-Belle Fontaine) and J. 




J. W. AKARD. 



E. Lucas' English Setter bitch Peach Maid (Sport's 
Count Danstone-Ch. Peach Blossom) equal third. 

There were thirteen starters in the Derby — 11 
English Setters and 2 Pointers, which was finished 
Tuesday afternoon. 

The All Age was begun Tuesday afternoon, two 
heats of which were run out. The first series was 
finished this evening. Six dogs were carried over 
for the second series. 

Throughout the running birds were fairly plentiful. 
Cover conditions were excellent, frequently almost 
ideal for bird work. For some reason or other both 
the young Derby dogs and the seasoned All Age 
entries as well, repeatedly ran through cover from 
which birds were afterwards flushed and failed to 
locate. Scent conditions were evidently handicapped 
by some unknown but potent agency. There were 
seventeen entries in the All Age. The attendance 
has not been up to that of past meetings. Enthusiasm 
and comaraderie among the attending club members 
and sportsmen has made up in great part for the 
non-appearance of a number of absentees. 

At the annual meeting on Tuesday evening the 
following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 
Elmer H. Cox of Madera, president; Jos. E. Terry 
of Sacramento, first vice-president; Hon. Chas. N. 
Post of Sacramento, second vice-president; E. 
Courtney Ford of San Francisco, secretary-treasurer. 
Executive Committee: John Schumacher of Los 
Angeles, H. L. Betten of Alameda, J. W. Considine 
of Seattle, V. L. Caglieri of San Francisco, T. J. A. 
Tiedemann of San Francisco and D. G. Macdonnell 
of Vancouver, B. C. 

The following sportsmen were elected members: 
D. G. Macdonnell, W. H. Easterbrook of Boston. 
Gordon Tevis, Lansing Tevis, of Stockdale. J. East- 
land of San Francisco and Col. E. A. Forbes of 
Sacramento. 

A full report of the trials will appear in next 
week's issue. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The premium list for the Southwestern Kennel 
Club show, next month, gives a full classification in 
all of the principal breeds and is liberally inducive 
for entries in the breeds that are generally rep- 
resented by but few entries. 

The list of specials embraces a fine selection of 
trophies and cups, there being no less than 70 
principal prizes offered, with the pleasing statement 
that other specials will be listed in the catalogue. 

The Bench Show Committee is deserving of the 
hearty commendation of Coast fanciers for the 
prizes offered for Pacific Coast bred dogs. This is a 
decided move in the right direction. The en- 
couragement of the breeder is of too much import- 
ance to be overlooked. Heretofore the principal 
specials of our shows have been awarded to best 
shown In most all breeds. This, to a certain extent 
is all right, but where does the breeder come in? 
Further, when all or most of the best specials are 
awarded to "best" in this, that or another breed 
it gives the professional dog broker the opportunity 
he is looking for. 



The opposition to the administration of the 
American Kennel Club has been aroused, according 
to the New York Times, by the election documents 
sent out by Secretary A. P. Vrendenburgh in the 
name of the Executive Committee of the club, and 
a protest was called forth from John W. Britton, 
2d, who represents the Bull Terrier Breeders' Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Britton addressed his protest to Pres- 
ident August Belmont, who replied, defending the 
action, and declaring that it would be continued. 
The correspondence explains itself: 

306 West Ninety-third Street, 

New York, January 8, 1908. 
Mr. August Belmont, Chairman American Kennel 
Club Executive Committee: 

Sir: — This morning's post brought me a broad- 
side signed "By order of the Executive Committee. 
A. P. Vrendenburgh, Secretary." (I wish I could 
believe it was done out of office hours.) This would 
lead me to the conclusion he signed it as Secretary 
of the American Kennel Club. The Executive Com- 
mittee has no more right to have its personal com- 
munications signed by the Secretary of the American 
Kennel Club than has the Ashland House Com- 
mittee, and should it make such a claim, you would 
be the first to dispute it. 

Your partisans have before now accused me of 
being an office-seeker, which statement is abso- 
lutely false. I would not accept, an office in the 
American Kennel Club if it was offered to me, which 
is, to say the least, not likely. Yours truly, 

J NO. W. BRITTON, 2D, 
Delegate from the Bull Terrier Breeders' Association. 



January 9, 1908. 
Mr. John W. Britton, 2d, 306 West Ninety-third 
Street, City: 

My dear Sir: — I am in receipt of your favor of 
January 8, in which you question the right of the 
Executive Committee of the American Kennel Club 
to authorize Mr. Vrendenburgh, as Secretary, to 
send out officially a circular, which it had approved, 
and of which you received a copy. 

Allow me to call your attention to the fact that 
the American Kennel Club, Incorporated, of which 
Mr. Vredenburgh is Secretary, did officially, at one 
of its meetings of delegates, authorize the general 
agreement, under which a vote is now being taken, 
are the questions at issue respecting the validity 
of the club's incorporation. It is not only the right, 
but the duty, of the Executive Committee to see 
that the matter is thoroughly understood, from the 
standpoint of the American Kennel Club and all 
interested in its welfare. It will continue, in this 
controversy, to correct any error which it believes 
is abroad, with respect to either the substance or 
merits of the contention, and in so doing believes 
it is meeting the wishes and requirements of every 
one entitled to vote. I remain, 

Yours respectfully, 

AUGUST BELMONT, 
Chairman American Kennel Club Executive Com- 
mittee. 

— o 

TRADE NOTES. 



A Good Man in a Good Place. 

"Dick" Reed, known to and popular with thousands 
of shotgun devotees on the Pacific Coast, has joined 
the ranks of trade representatives for the Union 
Metallic Cartridge Company and Remington Arms 
Company. 

"Dick" will make all points in this State and it 
is safe to state that he will make good. His busi- 
ness connection with the Selby Smelting and Lead 
Company, for five years past, as a "professional" 
shooter is one that was successful in every respect. 
His new field of application is a thoroughly familiar 
one and without a further calling the attention of 
the trade and our readers to Mr. Reed's new busi- 
ness affiliation, we will take the liberty of congratu- 
lating the U. M. C. and Remington managements 
on the acquisition of so capable a sportsman, and 
wish " Dick" every success possible. 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



WINNING FAMILIES. 



W ithin the past few years students of breeding the 
light harness horse have given much attention to 
the importance of winning families, or, as they 
should be more accurately described, families from 
which have come heat winners. The great brood 
mares as they are called, are those who have 
been the fountain heads of winning strains, and 
while in the past too much stress has been put 
upon 2:30 performers, even that was in a measure 
a guide, for there have been families from which 
have come even very few of this class, mediocre 
as it seems to be. In judging brood mares whose 
influence has been felt most strongly, it is well to 
bear in mind that a preponderance of stake win- 
ners, high-class race horses, champions, is after all 
what counts most, and any one of these is worth 
more in a family than a dozen trotters of ordinary 
capacity. In dealing with brood mares, statisticians 
as a rule give Miss Russell first place, and there is 
much justice in this award, for without doubt, the 
daughter of Pilot Jr. deserved during her life- 
time the title of queen of brood mares, as she now 
does that of the mother of trotters. There never 
has been in the history of the light harness horse a 
famous dam who even approximated Miss Russell in 
point of individuality. She was the most superb type 
ever seen, possessed of exquisite quality, abundant 
substance, and her poise and bearing were truly 
queenlike. A study of the photographs that were 
taken of her before she began to fade away visibly 
will show her blood like appearance, her almost 
faultless conformation. Her picture has been shown 
many times to breeders of thoroughbreds who were 
familiar with what constitutes excellence of con- 
formation, and almost invariably the likeness has 
been pronounced as that of a thoroughbred brood 
mare. 

Miss Russell not only produced a champion, but 
in so doing gave to the world a trotter without an 
equal as a speed marvel. Her daughter held her 
supremacy for many years, and even to-day her best 
performance has never been duplicated under identi- 
cally the same conditions. The son of Miss Russell 
have bred on successfully, and to-day her blood is 
found in the veins of many of the most brilliant 
performers in the history of light harness racing. 
The real greatness of this wonderful mare lay in 
the fact that she produced speed to every sire with 
which she was mated, and when the class of stallions 
to which she was bred is considered, they are found 
to compare unfavorably with those who were the 
consorts of other noted matrons. Harold never got 
a trotter that was comparable to Maud S. from any 
other mare, nor did Belmont ever get a sire that 
even approached Nutwood. As compared with the 
opportunities of Beautiful Bells, who was mated year 
after year with the greatest trotting sire of his 
day; with those of Alma Mater, whose greatest sons 
and daughters were by George Wilkes, Miss Russell's 
were limited, for Harold and Belmont were neither 
of them great sires when judged by the standards 
of to-day, nor was King Wilkes or even Woodford 
Mambrino. While Miss Russell never produced a 
trotter who took high rank among the race winners 
of the period in which they lived, her daughter 
Maud S. was so immeasurably superior to all others, 
with the possible exception of Jay Eye See, that she 
could probably have won any of the fixed events 
which were trotted in her day. She was a precoci- 
ous mare, coming to hand early, and her four- 
year-old trial of 2:17 y 2 was in itself proof positive 
of how marvelous a trotter she was. 

Another thing that must be taken into consider- 
ation in dealing with the immediate produce of the 
daughter of Pilot, Jr., is the fact that at Woodburn 
training was carried on in a very limited way, and 
several of the daughters of this great mare were 
retired to the stud without being given the oppor- 
tunity to thoroughly test their capacity on the track. 
Her son, Nutwood, while he acquired a very credit- 
able record, did so only after several years of train- 
ing, and can not be regarded as anything like first- 
class in this respect. He was very like the Belmont 
family in many respects, although his ability to breed 
on, must in a large measure be credited to the in- 
heritance he received from his dam, for other sons 
of Belmont have failed to accomplish what he has 
achieved. Beautiful Bells, although she is regarded 
by many students of breeding as well as practical 
horsemen as superior to Miss Russell, can hardly be 
judged by the same high standards, for while she 
was mated with a horse who got speed from almost 
anything that was bred to him, she failed to pro- 
duce a trotter who at maturity was capable of ac- 
complishing that which is credited to Maud S. 
Beautiful Bells, it is true, gave to the world more 
than one champion colt trotter, and this in itself 
entitles her to great distinction, yet the family has 
not bred on as well as has that of either Miss Russell 
or Alma Mater, and consequently the daughter of 
The Moor can not with justice be said to have 
equaled in her stud career the history of the ex- 
quisite gray queen of brood mares. Alma Mater, 
while her family is not as large as some others, 
was truly a very great producer, and had she ac- 
complished nothing else than to give to the world 
the incomparable Alcyone, she would have achieved 
enough to have immortalized herself. It was a 
fortunate circumstance that this daughter of Mam- 
brino Patchen and the .thoroughbred Estrella should 
have been in the same locality as George Wilkes, 
for this cross was indeed a fruitful one, and her 
owner builded better than he knew when he mated 
her with this most marvelous of progenitors. In 



Alcyone she produced a trotter of much merit, while 
in his full brother Alcantara, she produced one who, 
if he had not been the victim of an accident, must 
surely have become a stallion champion. 

Alcantara was probably capable of a mile, under 
favorable conditions, faster than the then existing 
record, and while he was never able to prove this 
fact in public, his private form was such as to justify 
the belief that he was the equal of any trotter of his 
day. Alcyone's stud career has never been ap- 
proached, for although it covered a very limited 
period, it resulted in many very high class trotters, 
sons and daughters, who not only achieved success 
themselves in the stud, but have continued to 
breed on until to-day the family is fully the equal 
of any other in the trotting register. Other sons 
as well as the daughter of Alma Mater, have added 
materially to the fame of their dam, yet as is usu- 
ally the case, the greatest successes have come 
down through one line. As an example of this 
Green Mountain Maid can be cited, for here was 
a broodmare whose reputation to-day depends al- 
most entirely on what has been done by the family 
of Electioneer. The daughter of Shanghai Mary pro- 
duced a degree of speed to almost every sire with 
which she was mated, yet so much of her stud 
career was devoted to producing foals by Messenger 
Duroc that she had little opportunity of founding 
more than one great family. Her owner, Charles 
Backman, had abiding faith in Messenger Duroc, 
yet the stallion was unworthy of such sublime 
confidence, for individuality he was far from perfect, 
and even with the opportunities he received at 
Stony Ford, with its superb collection of mares, he 
failed to found a family of importance to the breed- 
ing world. Green Mountain Maid, in producing Elec- 
tioneer, affected the light harness horse industry 
and the sport of racing, in a manner that has pos- 
sibly never been equaled, for not only was he the 
most successful sire of his day and begot cham- 
pions galore, but his family possesses a degree of 
quality that is extremely desirable and his sons 
and daughters have bred on with great uniformity. — 
The Stock Farm. 



FUTURITY NOMINATIONS. 



Word comes from Cleveland to the effect that the 
nominations for the futurity for foals of 1907 to be 
given by the American Association of Trotting Horse 
Breeders which closed December 31 have far exceed- 
ed expectations and there is every reason to believe 
that the richest futurity "in the world will be one 
that will be raced for in 1910 and conducted by this 
association. While it is impossible to tell the exact 
value of either the championship stallion or the 
matron stakes, it is safe to place the ultimate worth 
of the stallion stake at $20,000 and the matron stake 
at $14,000 or $15,000. In the champion stallion stake 
there have been 120 stallions named. This number 
includes every prominent sire in the country, there 
being hardly a stallion of any note that has not been 
named. With this large list of stallions named it is 
a conservative estimate to credit each stallion with 
twenty-five foals. Of course some of the young stal- 
lions will not have that many but the average will 
surely come up to twenty-five or more, so that at 
those figures 3,000 foals have been entered. 

Under the conditions of the stakes all nomina- 
tions must be made by members and all starters 
must be owned by members. All moneys such as 
the service fee of the stallion nominated and the 
various paymnts on the stake shall go toward the 
stake. 

When an owner of stallion nominates his horse 
it costs him just the amount of one service fee. But 
by so doing every foal by that stallion is entered 
in the stallion stake. The owner of the foal does 
not have to pay a cent of entrance money until the 
foal becomes a yearling, and then on December 1, 

1908, the first payment of $5 falls due. On July 1, 

1909, a $10 payment is due on two-year-old trotters 
and $5 on two-year-old pacers, and on May 1, 1910, 
a $15 payment is due on three-year-old trotters, and 
$10 on three-year-old pacers. On July 1, $25 is due 
on trotters, and $10 on pacers, and on the night be- 
fore the race $100 is due on trotters and $25 on 
pacers. All races are to be mile heats, best two in 
three and the money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per 
cent. Of course the entire amount of the futurity is 
to be divided 75 per cent to trotters and 25 per cent 
to pacers and then the money under respective 
events divided as above stated. Hopples are barred. 

Among some of the prominent stallions nomi- 
nated are found in the following lists: Trotters — 
Advertiser 2:15 1 / 4, Axcyone, sire of Axcyell 2:06% ; 
Axtellion 2:15%, Baron Dillon 2:12, Baron H. 2.19, 
Baron Gale 2:11%, Baronmore 2:14%, a great sire of 
early extreme speed; Bellini 2:13%, sire of three 
2:10 trotters the past season; Bingen 2:06%, sire of 
Todd 2:14%; Bingara, Boreal 2:15%, sire of Boralma 
and others; Bon Voyage 2:12%, Colonel Cochran 
2:10%, Dare Devil 2:09, Edgemark, Galileo Rex 
2:15%, Guy Axworthy, Grattan 2:13, John A. Mc- 
Kerron 2:04%, Judge Parker 2:10%, Jay McGregor 
2:07%, Jack McKerron (2) 2:23%, Kremlin 2:07%, 
McKinney 2:11%, Mainsheet 2:05, Moko, Oakland 
Baron 2:09%, Ormonde, Oro Wilkes 2:11, Peter the 
Great 2:07%, Prodigal 2:16, Sidney Dillon, The 
Tramp, Todd 2:14%, The Beau Ideal 2:15% and 
some others of less prominence. 

The pacing stallion list includes such sires as 
Audubon Boy 1:59%, Be Sure 2:06%, Fred S. 
Wedgewood 2:05%, Five Points 2:10, John R. Gen- 
rty 2:00%, Rubenstein 2:05, Star Pointer 1:59%, 
Walter Direct 2:05% and some others. With this 
grand list of stallions named there can not help but 



be the cream of the foala represented. 

The matron stakes contains 1,300 nomination*. 
Included in the nominations are every great produc- 
ing broodmare and every fast record mar* whlca haa 
been put to breeding. 

The exact time and place for the racing of theae 
stakes has not been decided upon, but it Is stated 
that they shall be held on some centrally locate* 
track after August 1, 1910. As Lexington la well 
located for horsemen from all sections of the coun- 
try it would not be surprising If the Kentucky city 
was the one selected by the executive committee of 
the American Association of Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers. Much interest will be taken in the foals entered 
in these stakes from now until the time of the race. 

o 

NO CHANGE IN DATES FOR GRAND CIRCUIT. 



There will be no change in the Grand Circuit for 
harness horse racing this year. This was the de- 
cision of the Stewards after a protracted session, 
January 14th, when the dates for the leading meet- 
ings of the season were announced. The schedule 
was agreed to without a dissenting vote. The 
Grand Circuit meetings open one week later thaa 
in past years, and, while the delay le much regretted 
by racing men and horsemen, yet the Stewards were 
compelled to delay the opening on account of Buffalo, 
which holds its meeting over the Kenilworth track 
where the running meeting will not end until July 
25th. The circuit will extend, as usual, ten weeks, 
making a total of twelve weeks, including Lexington. 

One big advantage will be obtained by the drivera 
and trainers by the late opening. It will extend 
the big line at Columbus up to the opening of the 
Lexington meeting, thus necessitating no vacant 
week, as was the case last year. 

For the first time in the history of the Grand 
Circuit, Daniel J. Campau did not represent the 
Grosse Point track, where the opening meeting of 
the major circuit has been held for many years. He 
represented the new racing association organized at 
Detroit, where the meeting will be held, including 
the trotting and pacing classics, the M. and M. and 
C. of C. Secretary Albert H. Moore of Providence 
will act as Secretary of the meeting, which will be 
held over the new Michigan State Fair Association'a 
track. 

The Indications point to four meetings where bet- 
ting will be barred. They are Cleveland, Readville, 
Providence and Hartford, each of these having se- 
cured dates with these expectations. Between now 
and the opening of the circuit, however, there may 
be some changes at one or more places, but at 
present it is certain that the line will not be die- 
turbed on account of the poolselling and betting 
question. 

Three applications for dates were declined. The 
one from Baltimore was backed by a number oX 
prominent citizens, who gave every assurance of 
a successful meeting over the Pimlico track. The 
Cella-Adler crowd, which secured the Grosse Point 
track, at Detroit, applied for one week, but the de- 
cision of the Stewards was prompt, and the applica- 
tion was denied. Last year Daniel Campau held the 
Detroit meeting over the Grosse Point track, but 
after the meeting he was notified that he would not 
be permitted to hold this year's meeting there. 

William P. Engeman applied for a meeting for 
Kalamazoo, Mich., requesting the week of July 20 
to 24. Dates for this week having been granted to 
Windsor, Ontario, and another Western track, the 
Stewards were compelled to refuse the application, 
which was the only one to find any favor with the 
Stewards. 

There was a heated discussion over the selection 
of a presiding judge and official starter. There waa 
a marked sentiment on the part of several membera 
to select their own officials, independent of the 
Grand Circuit Stewards. A compromise was effected 
whereby A. J. Keating of New York was selected 
as presiding judge for the entire circuit, and the 
members were left free to select their own starters. 

The resignations of James Butler, President of 
the Empire City Racing Association, and C. K. G. 
Hillings were largely Instrumental in forming the 
Grand Circuit. 

There was no change In the list of officers, the 
present officials being re-elected. They are: Presi- 
dent — John M. Johnson of Readville; Vice-President 
— H. M. Hanna of Cleveland; Secretary and Treas- 
urer — Albert H. Moore of Providence. The schedule 
follows: 

Detroit, Mich., July 27 to 31. 
Cleveland, Ohio, August 3 to T. 
Buffalo, N. Y., August 10 to T4. 
Poughkeopsle, N. Y., August 17 to 21. 
Readville, Mass., August 24 to 28. 
Providence, R. I., August 31 to September 4. 
Hartford, Conn., September 7 to 11. 
Syracuse, N. Y., September 14 to 18. 
Columbus, Ohio, September 21 to October S. 

o 

TEACHING A HORSE TO BACK. 



A correspondent of the Chicago Breeders' Gazette 
gives the following advice: "In teaching a horse 
to lead I never pull straight ahead, but always take 
a side pull; and in teaching a horse to back I use 
the same system. Now suppose we have lines on 
the horse and are standing behind him. Take a few 
steps to your left and pull on the right rein, bring- 
ing it well down on his thigh. This will pull the 
hind end of the horse one way and his head the other. 
Now step to your right and pull on the left rein. 
Keep repeating this and every time yon pull on him 
tell him to 'back.' " 



12 



T H 13 B R E E D E R AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908 



THE FARM I 



LONGHORN VS. SHORTHORN. 



The curious scientific doctrine of 
the survival of the fittest has few 
contest for supremacy among the 
longhorns and the shorthorns. The 
struggle has been long, the steps in 
the evolution consuming hundreds of 
centuries. According to the biological 
philosophers, it took thousands of 
years for cattle to acquire the queer 
frontal ornament known as the horns. 
It has taken fully as long, by steps 
still more remarkable, to lose or mo- 
dify them. In the former case nature 
alone operated, through the principles 
of natural and sexual selection. In 
the latter case, man became a factor 
and it was by a system of breeding, 
along the lines of the natural law, 
that the longhorn gave place to 
cattle either entirely without or with 
horns much diminished. Entirely aside 
however, from this mere feature or 
characteristic, forceful reasons were 
in operation to displace the one with 
the other. The longhorn belonged 
to another day, the day of the frontier 
and the pioneer. In the older days 
the prevailing type all over the west 
was the long-legged, longhorned ani- 
mal, with slabsides, much daylight 
under them, short of back, narrow of 
rump and deficient in beef-making 
qualities. They occupied the vast 
plains of northern Mexico, the Llano 
Bstacado of Texas, the slopes of the 
Sierra Madre and every valley be- 
tween the Mississippi and the Rocky 
Mountains. They were driven in 
herds of countless thousands for 
hundreds of miles to the market 
towns of the Mississippi Valley and 
furnished the hides and tallow for all 
industries needing these articles. As 
beef cattle they were conspicuous 
failures, their meat being accepted 
because nothing better could be ob- 
tained. 

When the railroads invaded the 
range and built shipping tracks from 
the main lines to the loading pens at 
the ranch, the last excuse for the 
propagation of the longhorns was ob- 
literated. Before this the longhorn 
was an absolute necessity. When it 
was compulsory to drive cattle for the 
market hundreds of miles to reach 
the nearest shipping point, the long- 
horn alone was equal to the test. Be- 
side him the fat, sleek shorthorn 
would have died by the wayside the 
first few hours of the journey, but the 
"Texas ranger," as he was called, was 
famous both for speed and endurance. 
His modern rival was an impossibility 
under frontier conditions. The prob- 
lem of water supply was another 
factor in the culture of the longhorns. 
In the early settlement of the south- 
west the stockmen were forced to de- 
I>end upon the streams that afforded 
a perpetual supply of water and there 
were few of them. That was before 
the day of the windmill and the arti- 
ficial lake. Only the longhorn could 
find pasture in the hills many miles 
from these streams and make daily 
pilgrimage to the water without detri- 
ment to his physical condition. This 
he would do at a pace which taxed 
the enduring qualities of the hardy 
mustangs of the "cow punchers." The 
ability of the longhorn to withstand 
the blizzards was wonderful, adapting 
him peculiarly to the pioneer period. 
A Texas "norther," which would 
freeze a tender shorthorn to death, 
had no terrors for the hardy long- 
legs that roamed the limitless plains. 

The eTarly settlers were not pre- 
pared to provide shelter for their 
stock, but the longhorn needed no 
coddling and sought his own shelter 
in the hills. Thus it will be seen that 
the very virtues of the longhorn were 
a detriment to him, when we consider 
the prime object for which cattle are 
raised. Endurance, hardihood, speed 
and capacity for slf-support were not 
the qualities that made good beef. 
Fat, not muscle, meat, not bones, 
compactness, not agility, are the qual- 
ities sought in cattle for slaughter. 
With all his traits, once commend- 
able, the longhorn has no place in the 
twentieth-century scheme. The pres- 
ent civilization demands meat, rather 



than speed in the marketable pro- 
duction from the range and the long- 
horn was not a meat-producer. He 
was healthy, vigorous and picturesque, 
but never fat. His appetite was pro- 
digious and his digestion perfect, but 
he defied every law of nature in his 
persistent refusal to "take on meat." 
He might have been — to paraphrase a 
sentiment from a certain Western 
Governor — "The rich, juicy meat in 
the national sandwich," but the long- 
horn simply would be nothing but 
horns and bone and muscle. Hence 
his exit from the pastoral stage and 
hence his replacement by the short- 
horn or nohorn under the inexorable 
law of the survival of the fittest. The 
latter realize the chief mission of 
cattledom by proving ideal furnishers 
of meat and milk. Their very slug- 
gishness, inaptitude for storms or 
hard treatment, their love of luxury 
and tenderness acquired therby, qual- 
ities diametrically opposite to those 
possessed by the creatures they dis- 
place, are precisely the ones that en- 
title them to precedence in an age 
seeking for the best beef producers. — 
American Farmer. 

o 

SOME UPS AND DOWNS. 



Some years ago we contracted a 
bad case of the chicken fever, and, as 
it is absolutely impossible to cure it 
without making a try at the business, 
we started. We took the fever in the 
month of November and immediately 
began to read everything and any- 
thing pertaining to chickens. By 
spring we knew it all — you couldn't 
tell us a thing — but since then we 
have unlearned a large part of that 
knowledge. 

In our reading we obtained a bulle- 
tin from the agricultural experiment 
station, Orono, Maine, which told of 
the muslin front house. We said, "If 
that works in Maine, it will work in 
Minnesota" We immediately built a 
house 12x16 feet on top of a hill, 
faced it to the east and muslined 
the front. Then we went to a com- 
mission dealer and got twenty-five 
old hens that he had kept in his cellar 
(waiting to be sold), for nobody 
knows how long. They were of 
every variety and of no variety at all 
— rose combs, single combs. Leghorns 
and Andalusians. We put them in the 
muslin-front house in zero weather, 
with plenty of straw to work in. and 
those hens not only did not freeze to 
death, but they did not freeze a comb. 
That settled the house question, and 
it has remained settled ever since. 

In our reading that winter we read 
advertisements and each and every 
advertiser had the "world's best 
$1,000 prizes" or more, but nothing 
about eggs. I said to my partner, 
W hat's the matter with raising some 
chickens that will lay eggs?" We 
believed it would pay. So "eggs" was 
our motto from then on. 

We bought two 200-egg incubators 
and six brooders and began to look 
for some breeder who had been work- 
ing for better layers, from whom to 
get our hatching eggs. We knew, 
personally, one breeder of national 
reputation and wrote to him in Feb- 
ruary. On March first he replied, 
"No eggs till April or May. I raise 
my chickens to show, not to lay." 

We finally learned of a man who had 
bred for eggs for years, and we sup- 
posed we could get eggs at a fair price 
from him. But he asked just as 
much or more, than some of the 
11,000 prize fellows. However, we fig- 
ured that we were getting the benefit 
of his years of breeding as well as 
the eggs, so sent him our order. 

We built six colony houses, each 3x6 
feet; 2 feet high in the rear and 3 
feet in front and imagined we were 
going to raise 1,000 chickens with 
that outfit; but we soon found we 
were wrong. 

The 3x6 colony houses were too 
small. We then built some 5x7 feet, 
which answered fairly well. We put 
an indoor brooder in each house and 
that year we incubated 1,800 eggs, 
hatched 800 chicks and raised 700 of 
that number. 

During the summer we built eight 
12x32 laying houses and had them 
completed on August 19th On August 
20th along came Mr. Cyclone and 
blew five of them entirely to pieces, 
destroyed over one mile of wire 
fencing, blew down 187 trees, and 



killed over 150 chickens. That put 
quite a crimp in our progress but. 
as soldiers are not made on the parade 
ground, we went to work again, and, 
in four weeks you would not have 
known there had been a storm. 

By this time we were "all in" finan- 
cially and it was either eggs from 
the 250 pullets we had left, or they 
would have to go to the butcher. 
On September 19th we went out 
among the pullets and told them just 
how we were fixed, and, I believe they 
understood, for the next day the first 
egg was laid, and that egg, up to that 
time, had cost us over $5,000. During 
the following five months ('to March 
first), those 250 pullets earned us, 
in market eggs alone, $512, with a 
feed bill of $30 per month. 

The following year we began ad- 
vertising Id a small way; got good 
returns, increased our house room 
time to time as the business war- 
ranted it. and now have the largest 
"down-to-date" poultry ranch in the 
Northwest. Our birds have never 
failed to begin laying when they were 
six months old, nor to keep at it. 

We have been able to maintain and 
greatly improve the laying qualities 
of our stock in a very simple manner. 
We operate twenty 200-egg incubators 
and from 200 eggs we mature some- 
thing over 100 fowls — 50 cockerels, 
50 pullets. 

We find that there is a difference 
of five to six weeks between the time 
the first pullet begins laying and 
when the last one, out of the same 
hatch, begins. As they start in to lay 
in the fall we leg-band those that 
start first, and, later make up breed- 
ing pens of those that laid first. We 
find that the pullets that lay the most 
eggs during November, December, 
January and February also lay the 
most during March, April and May. 

Many people ask us if the chicken 
business pays. It does, if you have 
the "goods," and then advertise them. 
It pays to use good-sized space, and 
not to be afraid to pay for some white 
space in the advertising. 

When you get an order for eggs or 
stock give your customer a square 
deal. Have him satisfied, if it takes 
more than you think he is entitled to; 
a satisfied customer is the best ad- 
vertisement any breeder can have. 
There are many things about the busi- 
ness we have yet to learn, but we 
have learned to hatch good chicks, 
raise them so they will be laying in 
from five to six months, and to keep 
them at it. — L. B. Rich, in "North- 
western Agriculturist." 

o 

HORSES WITH HEAVES. 

Broken wind is not curable, or it 
would not be such a common thing to 
see a good class of horses sold at a 
ridiculously low price because of this 
infirmity; but it is quite possible, by 
judicious management, to keep the 
ordinary case going with tolerable 
comfort to the animal and a fair 
amount of satisfaction to the owner 
or driver who is not particularly 
horse proud. 

The first thing is to appreciate or 
take into consideration the nature and 
cause of what is popularly called 
"broken wind." It is not a respiratory 
disease, in the proper acceptance of 
the term, but is due, in the majority 
of cases, to bad feeding. Feeding an 
inordinate quantity of bulky, innutri- 
tious fodder, particularly badly saved, 
moldy or dusty seed hay, is one of 
the most common causes of broken 
wind. 

The class of horses most fre- 
quently found to be broken winded are 
farm horses and inferior ponies. Both 
are greedy feeders, and both belong 
to a class of owner notoriously nig- 
gardly in their provision of corn. 
Thus the broken winded horse should 
be fed on the best of food, and of a 
less bulky or more concentrated 
character than is generally supplied 
to horses of this class. More corn 
and less hay should be given, and all 
the food should be free from dust 
and given slightly dampened, by 
sprinkling with salt and water. The 
broken winded horse should be fed on 
the little-and-often principle and the 
daily allowance of food divided into 
a large number of small feeds. The 
hours of feeding should be adapted to 
the hours of work, so that the horse 
is not called upon to labor on a dis- 
tended stomach. The largest meal 



should be given at night, after the 
work is over, and this is the time 
when the larger part of the moderate 
quantity of hay allowed should be 
fed. Linseed and bran should be 
given occasionally in the form of 
mash. Carrots and green feed are 
good for broken winded horses, being 
digestible and slightly laxative, but 
too much green feed is incompatible 
with condition, and the thing to be 
aimed at in the case of the broken 
winded horse is the maintenance for 
the animal in hard condition. 

A cool, well ventilated stable is a 
necessity. Water is best kept stand- 
ing within reach of the animal, so 
that it can drink at will; or where 
this is not possible, water should be 
offered before each feed. It should 
be clean and the supply frequently 
changed. Regular, moderate work, 
without which the maintenance of 
condition is impracticable, is better 
for the broken winded horse than ir- 
regular labor or long spells of idle- 
ness. At the start go slowly, until 
the bowels have been emptied. A dis- 
tended stomach and bowels, by press- 
ing on the diaphragm, increase the 
distress in breathing, and this is an- 
other reason for the food being more 
concentrated, or why it should con- 
tain the elements of nutrition in as 
small bulk as possible. 

There is always a characteristic 
cough associated with broken wind, 
and on some occasions, where there 
has been some departure from the 
rules of feeding or good hygiene, or • 
in certain states of the weather, there 
is an increase in the severity of the 
symptoms which may call for medi- 
cine to relieve them; but drugs are 
not of much use in ordinary cases 
of broken wind, and should not be 
persisted in when the acute symp- 
toms have yielded. When recourse is 
had to medicine from time to time 
it seems more effective than when 
regularly given. 

The bowels of the broken winded 
horse should never be allowed to be- 
come constipated, and when judicious 
feeding with linseed, carrots or green 
stuff does not suffice to keep them 
regular, a laxative should be given. — 
London Farm and Home. 

o 

ARTIFICIAL INCUBATION. 



Those who are contemplating using 
an incubator the coming season may 
find many useful hints in the follow- 
ing, written by one who knows where- 
of he speaks: 

It is usually a safe proposition to 
follow the instructions of the manu- 
facturer that you bought your incu- 
bator from, but I find that you will 
have to do a lot more to get the best 
results. The directions say turn the 
eggs twice daily. That is all right 
as far as it goes, but turning them 
half a dozen times a day will give 
far better results. To illustrate: 
When I first started with incubators 
I followed the directions of turning 
the eggs twice a day, with the result 
that I always had a number of crip- 
pled chicks. Since then, by stirring 
the eggs whenever I happen to be 
near the machine, I have not had a 
cripple for the last two or three years. 
Quite a difference, isn't it? 

In addition to the above stirring. I 
turn and cool the eggs twice daily 
after the second day. My method of 
turning the eggs is to take a dozen 
or so from the center of the tray, 
then shuffle the others toward the 
center with the hands, the same as 
the hen does with her body. Now take 
the eggs that you took from the center 
and lay them around the outside of 
the tray. I also turn the tray part 
ways around each time. This is 
necessary because no incubator has 
even heat in all parts of the egg 
chamber, and while the directions 
say not to do so, I always leave the 
incubator doors open while turning 
and airing the eggs, so as to give it 
also the benefit of a good airing, as 
the hen airs herself as well as the 
eggs when she leaves the nest. This 
is nature's method and we should try 
and imitate her as near as we can 
in the artificial method. I find It best 
to run the incubator in a convenient 
place, such as the dining-room or 
spare bed-room, and to have the sun 
shine into the room as much as pos- 
sible, but not directly on the ma- 
chine. The room should be well venti- 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



lated, but drafts should be avoided, 
especially directly on the incubator. 

When the incubator has been run- 
ning at the required temperature for 
a day or so, introduce the eggs into 
the machine, having none on end or 
piled on each other; an incubator can 
be run partly filled, but not crowded. 
The eggs should be clean, and of 
uniform size and shape. They will 
lower the temperature, but don't turn 
up the lamp, as it takes a lamp 
twenty-four hours before it will re- 
turn to the point where you have been 
holding it. Fill the lamp and trim the 
wick once or twice daily, as. the case 
may be. Do this regularly at the 
time the eggs are being turned and 
aired. Don't expect too much from 
your first hatch, especially early in 
the spring. Eggs at this time are not 
very fertile and unless great care is 
taken they are liable to get chilled, 
and a chilled egg should not be used 
for hatching. Fifty per cent is good 
hatching with pullet eggs. Chicks 
hatched from pullet eggs seem to be 
weak and you will find many dead 
in the shell and more will die in the 
first few days. At least this has 
been my experience in the past two 
years. If the incubator is given an 
even chance with a hen, the incubator 
will outhatch her nearly every time. 
It is my honest opinion taht almost all 
of the standard incubators made to- 
day will hatch every hatchable egg 
if given a fair chance. 

Don't be too anxious and fool with 
the regulator; set it according to 
your directions. Be careful to adjust 
the flame the proper height. After 
you have filled and trimmed the 
lamp remember the regulator can let 
off the surplus heat, but cannot pull 
up the temperature. Don't open the 
incubator door more than is absolute- 
ly necessary while the hatch is com- 
ing off, as this lowers the temperature 
and thus checks the progress of the 
hatch. 

o 

"The more I feed the more I become 
confirmed in the belief that the day is 
not far off when mighty few cattle 
over eighteen months will be market- 
ed as fat cattle for slaughter. Like 
all other old cattle feeders a few years 
ago I had an idea that the larger the 
steer the larger the profit. We never 
thought of marketing a steer in those 
days until he was over four years old. 
That day is past, and very few over 
three years old can be found on the 
fat cattle market now. Coming down 
to two-year-olds, we find more than 
in any other class, and I am betting 
on the majority of them going con- 
siderably below the two-year-old mark 
before long. No one will doubt the 
fact that the high-grade steer fifteen 
months old, that has been carefully 
handled and well-finished, will make 
better beef than the three-year-old 
steer Then there is less waste to 
them, and the quality of the beef is 
far better. I grind all of my feed, 
and rush them along till they are 
about fifteen months old, when I let 
them go," says J. C. Cobb, expert 
cattle feeder of Odessa, Mo. 

o 

No man who keeps cows for the 
money there is in it is so rich that 
he can afford to keep poor ones. The 
rich fellow, who goes into dairy busi- 
ness for the satisfaction he can get 
out of it usually keeps the best cows 
that money can buy. The poor man 
who must depend upon his dairy for 
his living and profit too often keeps 
poor cows because the better ones cost 
more money. The rich fellow could 
well afford to keep this kind, but it 
is the most foolish kind of foolishness 
for the poor man to own such cows. 
He is just the man who should own 
good cows. It is impossible, of course, 
for him to buy the kind of cows that 
the rich fellow does, but this is not 
necessary or advisable. He can build 
up a herd of good cows from a very 
few good milkers by using a good 
dairy sire, and by studying the indi- 
viduality of the herd. Just a little 
improvement each year will do the 
business. 

One of the most striking character- 
istics of the Polled Angus is the long- 
evity of the breed and they say the 
cows have to meet accidental death 
or be slaughtered in old age while yet 
useful. Old Grannie, cow No. 1 in the 
Scotch polled herd book, is said to 



have met accidental death at the age 
of thirty-one after having been a 
regular producer of calves for a 
quarter of a century. 

o 

Prof. Van Pelt of Iowa claims that 
the advantage of the silo on the dairy 
farm is great. He states that two 
pounds of milk can be produced where 
under any other method of feeding, 
except on pasture, there would be 
only one pound. Silage never taints 
milk if fed directly after milking, and 
if the mangers are kept clean and 
sweet. The best possible ration for 
a dry cow, not on pasture, he gives 
as corn silage and alfalfa hay. The 
best ration for a milking cow, corn 
silage, alfalfa hay and about six or 
eight pounds of grain to furnish con- 
centrates. 



Manufacturers of concentrated com- 
mercial feeding stuffs have been quick 
to realize the food value of alfalfa as 
the protein-bearing feed. For in- 
stance, in one experiment with milk 
cows continued for a period of 207 
days, a grain ration was fed composed 
of ten parts of cottonseed meal and 
three parts of linseed meal. When 
alfalfa meal was substituted for the 
bran in this ration, nearly as much 
milk was produced. Hay and corn 
silage were fed as roughage in both 
tests. This test indicated that the 
alfalfa meal was worth fully $18 a 
ton. We of the alfalfa country do 
not begin to appreciate the utility of 
this great legume. 

o 

In an experiment to ascertain the 
cost of raising a calf, Professor Shaw 
of Michigan Station took a dairy 
calf and kept an accurate account of 
the expense of feeding for one year 
from its birth. The amount of feeds 
used in that time were 381 pounds of 
whole milk, 2,568 pounds of skim milk, 
1,262 pounds of silage, 219 pounds of 
beet pulp, 1,254 pounds of hay, 1,247 
pounds of grain, 174 pounds of roots, 
14 pounds of alfalfa meal and 50 
pounds of green corn. The grain 
ration consisted of three parts each 
of corn and oats and one part of 
bran and oil meal. At the end of the 
year the calf weighed 800 pounds at 
a cost of $28.55 for feed. The calf 
was a Holstein. 

o 

H. G. Koch, a German farmer, has 
been tilling the soil for four years 100 
miles north of the Zambesi River in 
Central Africa. No other farmer lives 
within fifty miles of him. There are 
not twenty European farmers in the 
whole of Northwest Rhodesia, a coun- 
try as large as California. He likes 
the soil and the climate and is there 
to stay. His farm is as near the equa- 
tor as the north part of Central 
Amterica, but it stands more than % 
4,000 feet above the sea and the heat 
is less oppressive than in many other 
sections of Africa. 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



r Al . —It ia p^netmt 
rUr !ng,sootllisg nml 
healing, n:id for all OI< I 

the Wounds, Palm 

txterior Cancers, Boili 

Human B«B*o a » 



CAUSTIC BALSAM hoi 
eqtnl 
Linlmi 



Body 



We would say to ali 
who buy it that il doc: 
lot contain a particle 
at poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ex 
ternal use. Persistent 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Perfectly Safe 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all Still Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 
Cornhill. Tel.— "One bottle Caudle Balaam did 

my rheumatism more g.*»d than * I "■> I"'"' In 

Sctor'iblUi." OTTO a BEVRR. 

Price t I .SO par bottle. Sold hy diuirgisti, or sent 

bynaazpraia prapald Write (or Booklet B. 

The LAWRENCE- WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, 0. 



John Rarilnlin. formerly of t lie Thurlow 
Block 

John Ka v ana gh . formerly of the Palace 
Hotel 

Kavanagh & Barduhn 

Merchant Tailors 

1124 Golden Gate Avenue, 
Between Buchanan and Webster Sta., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Fairmont Hotel 

Management of 

Palace Hotel Co. 

A Guarantee of Excellence 



The only large hotel commanding 
a view of our Incomparable bay. 
The best located hotel in the 
world, as it is the most convenient 
to the business centers, while its 
elevation affords wholesome ad- 
vantages in the way of pure air, 
sunshine and the absence of all 
annoyances connected with the 
rebuilding of a great city. 

EUROPEAN PLAN •:■ 

Rates, single: $2.50, $3, $4, $5, 

$6, $7, $8. 
Suites: $10, $12, $14, $16, $18, $20 
.EVERY ROOM WITH BATH. 

Music a feature at Dinner and 
in the Foyer, evening?. 
Address 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



STALLION CARDS 

Folders, Posters and Pamphlets 
Compiled and Printed. 

PEDIGREES 

TABULATED 

diving Performances of the get of 
sires and dams. Typewritten, 
ready to frame. 

STALLION SERVICE 

BOOKS, $1.00 

With index and blank notes for ser 
vice fee. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco, Cal- 

FAST PACER FOB SALE. 



Seymow M. 2:23 by Diawood, dam 
Nancy H. by Upstart. Brown horse, 
six years old, absolutely sound an 1 
good mannered. Stands 15% hands 
high, weighs close to 1100 pounds. Was 
timed separately a mile at Pleasanton 
in the 2:20 pace in 2:12, heat won by 
Inferlotta in 2 :07 V,. He has been a 
half mile in 1:03% to Miller cart and 
iiuarters in 30 seconds. For price and 
further particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davisville. Cal. 



HIGH-CLASS CARRIAGE TEAM FOR 
SALE. 



Geldings, solid bay, handsome, per- 
fect match, five and six years old, 16 
hands, weigh 1.200 pounds each. Very 
toppy, rapid walkers and travelers. Fine 
knee and hock action, broken single and 
double, not afraid of cars or automo- 
biales. Gentle disposition, absolutely 
sound, guaranteed without blemish. 

Also two single driving horses, seal 
brown and a bay. Four and five years 
old, 15.3 to 16 hands high, weigh 1,100 
and 1,150 pounds. Hither one can trot 
a three-minute gait. Very handsome, 
gentle and sound. All these horses arc 
in (irst-class condition. Appaly to H. 
OLSEN, 814 B St., Haywards, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 



Hcaiitiful black marc, standard bred, 
height 16 hands, age five and a half 
years; fast walker; can trot or pace. 
Has shown as good as 2:35 on three 
weeks' work. Fur further particulars 
enquire at H. kayser, Rusb House, 
San Jose, Cal. 



FILES CURED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT la guaranteed to 

cure any rase nT Itching. Blind, lil I- 

ing or Protruding Plies in 6 to 14 
days or money refunded. 50 cts. 



Racing ! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Race Track 

OPENING DAY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 

Races Commence at 1:40 P. M., Sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 
20 minutes until 1:40 P. M. No 
smoking in the last two cars, which 
are reserved for ladies and their 
escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



STAM B. FILLY FOR SALE. 



A coming three-year-old, entered and 
paid up on in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
and Stanford Stakes, sired by Stam B. 
2:11%, dam Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%; 
second dam Flora H., dam of Thomp- 
son 2:14%, and Bonetti (trial 2:14%); 
third and fourth dams by producing 
sires. Is now in Henry Helman's string 
at Pleasanton, where she can be seen. 
Trotted a mile in 2:50 as a two-year-old. 
An excellent prospect. For further par- 
ticulars address HENRY HAHN, 2125 
Buena Vista Ave., Alameda. 

W. HIGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office With E. Stewart & Co., 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 



JERSEYS. HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 
HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 
Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Nilea 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums. California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co.. San 
Mateo. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 
make. Moffltt & Towne. Los Angelea 
make. McFall & Co.. Portland. Oregon. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



Combination horse, five years old. 
Shows all gaits under saddle, single- 
foots three-minute gait, trots square to 
buggy, very showy, trick horse. Lady 
can drive or ride. Swellest riding horse 
on the Coast. Sound, and can ho 
taught anything. Suite 11 to 14, 2011 
Mariposa St., Fresno, Cal. 

JACK FOR SALE. 



Weighs 1,000 pounds, is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 

S. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa Cal. 

STALLION WANTED. 



A high acting trotting stallion that 
will weigh close to or fully 1,300 
pounds, is high headed, stylish, of good 
conformation, and a sure foal getter. 
Record no object. Address giving pedi- 
gree and description and price wanted 
R. M. H., Care Breeder and Sportsman, 
P. O. Box 417, San Francisco, Cal. 

TWO FACING STALLION COLTS 
WANTED. 

A yearling or two-year-old by Star 
Pointer and one by Zombro. Must be 
good color, natural pacers, standard 
bred and registered, or eligible to regis- 
tration. Bay or brown, little or no 
white, of good size, neat heads, not too 
high on leg, standing and traveling 
square on their feet. Must have 
plenty of knee and hock action. Must 
be absolutely sound and out of good 
mares. Address giving price, pedigree 
and full particulars as to speed. If 
worked, etc., F. W. kelley, Breeder 
and Sportsman, 616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco. 



H 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[ Saturday. January 25. 1008. 




ITS SUCCESS IS PERPETUAL. 

Every day fastens a new series of 
greatness to its crowded record of 
achievements. On abandoned cripples, 
on desperate cases, on pronounced In- 
curables, on the young and on the old, 
for incipient and chronic lameness it 
is put to extreme tests and scores a 
■ew and lasting- triumph. 



THE CITIZENS' BANK 
of 

Atchlnson County. 

Rock Port. Mo. 

I have bought several bottles of 
"SAVE-THE-HORSE" through Mr. C. 
H. Widiner, but as he has sold out, will 
order direct. 

I used part of last bottle on my bay 
mare that was lame in hind tendon and 
she Is doing tin.-, but to make sure, en- 
close draft for $5 for another bottle. 
Have had over thirty-five years' experi- 
ence in drug business and consider it 
the greatest Vet. liniment I have ever 
bandied. 

Yours respectfully, 

W. W. HUDGENS. 
Paterson, N. J. 
I used your "SAVE-THE-HORSE" 
according to directions and find lame- 
bh.ss is gone. Also the knee was in 
very bad condition, springing over, 
while now it is normal. Kindly mall 
SI box of the Ointment and we will 
money on receipt. 
Yours truly, 
THE J. H. WESTER VEI..T LUMBER 

CO., F. J. Westervelt, Secretary. 
"SAVE-THE-HORSE" is worth its 
weight In gold. No other agency, 
remedy or method can accomplish such 
miraculous and unfailing results. It 
saves time and money. 

MAKES A TENDON LIKE A ROD 
OF STEEL. 

Permanently cures Bone and Bog 
Spavin. Ringbone (except low Ring- 
bone), Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint. Shoe 
Boil. Wind Puff, Injured Tendons and 
all lameness, without scar or loss of 
•sir Horse may work as usual. 

M.M »er Bottle, with a written guar- 
antee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make It. Send for 
a eopy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Bxpress 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
I* Bay* Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 




' TOM DILLON 



— Ageat far — 



John B. Stetson's Hats 



Orders Iliad by mall. 

▼*» Bess Ave. * MeJOllster ■«., 
Baa Traaeleee. 



BWBBTBB KA9KBBT STAH.IOW". 

At eae-balf ether people's prices If 
yeu waat bargains write at ence to 
K. P 8TKRICKBP. West Orange. M. J 

Tuttlc's Elixir 

Greatest maker of sound horses in the 
world. Tested many years, never fails if 
cure be possible. $100 reward if it does. 
For lameness, curb, splint, 
spavin, ringbone, swellings, 

Tuttlc's 
Family Elixir 

liniment for household use. Ask 
for I utile's American Worm and 
Condition Powders and Hoof 
Ointment. "Veterinary Experience," perfect horse- 
man's guide free. Symptoms and treatment for 
all common ailments. Write for it. Postace 2c. 
TITTLE'S ELIXIR CO., 52 Beverly St.. Boston. Mass. 
Los angelee, w. A. Shaw, Mgr., 1921 Now England *». 
Sev/arc c/ all blister j; only temporary relit/, if any. 




WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

TBTBKINABT STJKGEON 
1155 Golden date Ats. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 
BAB FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— In— 

HALFTOHlg ABB LINE ENOBAVINQ 

Artlstle Designing. 
141 Taleaela St. Ban Franolseo 

BUBBIBOID ROOFING 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

EONESTELL. RICHARDSON It CO., 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco. Cal. 

PETER 8 A X E A BON. SI J !2d street. 
Oakland. Cal.. Importers, Breeders and 
Dealers for past thirty yearg. All varie- 
ties Cattla. Horses. Bheep. Hogs. Hlgh- 
elass breading stock. Correspondence ss- 
Not tad 

COLLIE AND BLOODHOUND PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. 



Best bred Young Stock on the Coast. 
Sires and Dams winners on the Bench 
and Workers in the Field. Address 
T. S. GRIFFITH, 
Glen Tana Collie Kennels, 
Spokane, Wash. 

FOR SALE— SETTER PUPS. 

Pedigreed English Setter Pups, two 
months old. Address 

M. PERRY. 
454 West Santa Clara St., San Jose. 



j Jurt Ei\ovgrK| 

1 and lust as they want it. The rieht way to 
salt animals is to let them help themselves. 

Compressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

In onrPa tent Feeders, aupplrrenned ilai ry salt. 
They mean animal thntt. They cost hut little. 
, Convenient for you and your 

anlmala suffer no neglect. A?k 
js>- your dealer and write us for 
■ift^Vv booklet. 

Be I mom 
Stable 
Supply Co. I 

PsUBUtl 



STALLION FOR LEASE. 



Not wishing to train him this year, I 
will lease to a responsible party on 
liberal terms, for the stud season of 
1908. a five-year-old stallion by Sidney 
Dillon (sire of Lou Dillon 1:58V4), dam 
Eadywell 2:1G^> (dam of Local 2:19%), 
by Electioneer; second dam Lady 
Lowell, dam of two in list, by Schultz's 
St. Clair. This young horse is a solid 
built fellow, well made all over, and 
will weigh about 1,000 pounds. Should 
sire speed from all sorts of mares. For 
further particulars address JOE CUI- 
CELLO, Fleasanton, Cal. 



You Can't Cut Out 

A BOG SPAVIN or 
THOROUGH PIN, but 



^JJSORBINE 



will clean them off, and you work the 
horse same time. Doesnot blister or 

remove the hair. Will tell you more if 
you write. 13.00 per botile, delivered. 
Book A C free. 

A ItSORltlXK, Jit., for mankind, 
&l .nil bottle. Cures Varicose Veins, Vari- 
cocele, Hydrocele, Ruptured Muscles or 
Ligaments, Knlar^ed (.lands, Allays rain, 
tienulne mfd. only by ^) 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

S4 Monmouth St. Springfield, Mats. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. : Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.: F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 




„q coPA/a* 



a 
z 



CAPSULES 



THE EAST IS THE 



BIG COLT MARKET 

BUYERS DEMAND THAT COLTS HAVE 

EASTERN FUTURITY ENGAGEMENTS 



ENTER YOUR MARE IN THE 

American Horse Breeder Futurity 

FIFTH RENEWAL 

PURSE - $10,000 

For Mares Bred in 1907, Foals of 1908 



I^COSTS ONLY 



$1 



TO ENTER A MARE 



For particulars address AMERICAN HORSE BREEDER, 162 High Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Son of Mi KtNM'.Y J:llK. 
World's (Jrcatcst Sir.' of Speed 



Bonnie McKinney 41383 

Hani Martha Kmzicr by Rustic; 2nd dam Emma by Wbippleton; 8rd dam Gladys by Uladiator, etc. 
Bonnie McKinney, foaled 1909, tea grand individual, coal black, fast ( J- year-old trial 2:20) and highly 
bred. Four black colts by him on exhibition. 

Fee: $40 for the Season. 

Bonnie Searchlight 43899 



January 1st. to July 1st. 

Son Of Skaihhi.h.ht 2:08)4. 

King of Race Horses. 



DfUn Bits B. by Boodle Jr. ; 2nd dam GabUan Girl by Uobilan ; 3rd dam Ultra by Elmo HOT. etc. 
Bonnie Searchlight, closely resembles his sire, and is a magnificent brown colt, 3 years old,* fast 

natural trotter and will be tniiiu d to race this year. 

Fee: $40 for the Season. January i*. to juiy i«t. 

Will be pleased lO show these horses at any time. Excellent Bare taken of marcs. Pee returned if 
mare fails to iret with ioal. Apply to or address 

II. BUSING, Race Track, Alameda, Cal. 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gat* Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars.) 
Best located and healthiest 6table in San Francisco. Always a good roadster 
on hand for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park 
roadsters and prepare horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to stable 
end not have their horses frightened by autos or cars 



Agents and Correspondents Wanted Every- 
where for The Breeder and Sportsman 




TALLION OWNER 



If In need of anything In the linn of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catatonias, Horse 1 ooks, 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock and made from photos, 
Hoof I'ads of all kinds for road or track, lireedlns Hobbles, Stallion 
Supports. Pronators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : . 



MAGNUS FLAWS Jb C O. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO^ 



WRITE BREEZE. HE'S THE DOCTOR. 

TELL HIM YOUR CARBURETER TROUBLES. 

If your Gas Engine, whether It Is in an automobile or boat, does not run to 
suit you . GET A TEXT BOOK SENT FREE. 

Agents: 

New York — Breeze Carbureter Co., 101 W. 66th St. Philadelphia — Rittenhouse 
Garage, 214 So. 23d St. Toronto, Ontario, Can. — E. R. McKinlay, 16 
Seaforth Ave. Chicago — Thos. H. McNevin, 70 La Salle St. 
Boston — V. J. Jacobs, 46 Columbus Ave. 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE— BIG THING. 
Our Terms are Right. Our Goods are Right. There's Money In It. 

BREEZE CARBURETER CO., 

280 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 



Saturday, January 25, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



GOLCHER BROS., 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 

FISHING TACKLE 
AMMUNITION 
SPORTING GOODS 




511 Market St., San Francisco 



General Watts 2:09^4, World's Champion three-year- old 
stallion by 



"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:15y 2 

And winner of American Horse Breeder Futurity. It pays to 
book to such a sire. 

when writing kindly The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N, Y. 

mention thus journal r j > > 



Time Legged Horses' 

are not curiosities by any means. The country js full of them. TIk' 
fourth leg is there all rinht but il is not worth anything because of a curl 
splint, spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these 
anments and pul another sound leg under him by the use of 

Quinn's Ointment* 

It In tlmd tried and reliable. When ft homo la eured 
rTniurPV^ya mm^a vrlth Quinn's Ointment lie stavs eured. Mr. K. r. Burke 

^•Mk. ( ?S^HSSi < 1 1 S ] 1 1 1 1 1 u' 1 1 " 1 1 1 . M ' 1 . . '1 li.-ivo lieeu 

* ' UHintr Quinn's Olntm.nt lorncveral yearfl and have cf- 

foeted many marveluus cures; It will no deeper and* 
cailHC lesH pain than any blister 1 ever used. Thought 
It mv duty for the benefit of home* to recommend your 
Oinlment. 1 am never without It " This l» the irciiTal 
Verdict l>V oil w ho irivp Quinn's Oinlment a trial. H'or 
curbs, spllntH, spavins, winilpnirs. and all Imiih-Iu". it 

la nnequaled. Price SI per bottle at all druifirists 

/9>^»4sW^, , ^&^^fi££fJs3^B or M ilt by mail. Send for ei ren la i>, testlinoniala,<fcc. 

r^S^OsJtZmmmWM Ww Bm Eddy & Co . r Whitehall, N. Y. 




The Highest Average 

FOR THE YEAR OF 1907 
was made by Mr. Fred Gilbert who, of course, used 

DUPONT SMOKELESS 

THE OFFICIAL RECORDS show that during 1907 Mr. Gilbert shot 
at 9,195 targets and broke 8,817 

A Grand Average of 95.89 Per Cent 

ELEVEN of the 16 men who made AN AVERAGE OF 93 
PER CENT or better used 

Dupont Brands 

OF SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

The Highest Amateur Average 

(94.5 PER CENT) 
was made by an Illinois amateur, who also used 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE LONGEST RUN OF THE YEAR 

271 STRAIGHT 

made by J. M. Hawkins with 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE POWDER THAT MAKES AND BREAKS RECORDS 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 

*-PPPO>» + + P- »»*»IV p. p. p. p. »»p.»».|».».»»>>»^»»» 
SI 

£ 

« 

4 
C 
C 

c, 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4 Telephone 
* Temporary 1883 





Kinney Lou 2:075 

Reg. No. 3762I 

FASTEST TROTTING SON OF THE ( i It kat McKINXKY 2:11%. 

j Cash or approved note. 

% 1C0 for the Season j ^Mum i..iui-K-. 

Diamond Mac 

Kivr yours old by Kinnkv Loo 2:07%; <l«ni by Poll Marvin. 
A grand individual unci highly bred young horse. 



$30 for the Season 



< 'ash or approved note. 
I'siinl return privilege. 



The above stallions « ill stand a, SANTA CLARA, Oil. 

Best of care taken of mares. For further particulars addre 
sue No. 
.la mi's mi. 



p jnes Si! BUDD D0BLE, 15 North 1st St, San Jose, Cal. 



HAS THE BLOOD OF CHAMPIONS IN HIS VEINS. 
Sired by Antrim 5918 (sire of Anzell a 2:06%, and dam of Vision 2:09%). 
First, dam Birdie by Jay Bird 5060, sire of Hawthorne 2:06%, Allerton 
2:09%, Early Bird 2:10, Invader 2:10, Gitchie Manitou 2:09% and dams of 
Crescent Route 2:08y 2 , Codero 2:09% and Bessie Drake 2:08%. 

Second dam Lady Lyle by Geo. Wilkes; third dam Dame Tansey, dam of 
two, by Daniel Lambert. 

Will Make the Season of 1908 at Pleasanton. — $50 to Insure. 
Address 

THOS. RONAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Do You Want the Best? 



Breed Your Mares to 



Zombro 2:11 



Son of McKinney 2:11% and Whisper by Almont Lightning. 
Service Fee — $50. 

Zombro holds the Coast record (2: 13) for three-year-old trotting stallions. 
His daughter, Bellemont 2:09%, holds Coast trotting record for three-year-old 
Allies. His son, Hymettus 2:08^ hoi ds world's race record for three-year-old 
geldings. Zombro has four in the 2:10 list, ten in the 2:15 list and seven- 
teen in the 2:20 list. He has won more first prizes in the show ring than any 
other stallion in California, among them the gold medal at the great Port- 
land Fair — over eighteen competitors. His colts always sell for big prices. 
Address 

GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3949 South Figueroa Street, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

STALLION FOLDERS 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know AND WE WILL DO THE REST. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures made 
fujm Photographs. 

Stnllion Service Books $1.00. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
Pacific Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



75 PER CENT OFALLHO 



RSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS. 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



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R. T. Frasler Pueblo, Colo 

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A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal 

Wm. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

W. C. Topping San Diego, Cal. 

Main- Winchester-Jepsen Co 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

H. Thorn waldson Fresno, Ca.l 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drug* 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1219 



JAS. B. CAMPBEL I CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago 



16 



[Saturday, January 25, 1908. 





NEW WORLD'S RECORD 

15,000 Targets Without a Miss 

J. W. Akard's claim to the title, "The King of Rifle Shots," is well earned. His performance of breaking 15,000 
regulation clay targets without a miss is the greatest exhibition of skill on record. He used one shot only for each 
target. He threw his targets with his right hand, holding his gun with his left. He used 

U. M. C. .22 SHORT CARTRIDGES 

whose perfect quality supported his perfect aim. A great per cent of the targets were broken edgeways, so that the 
diameter of the disc does not truly represent the size of the moving target in _the air. Mr. Akard's earlier run of 1,659 
small marbles without a miss is nearly twice as long as any previous record on similar objects. In this case, also, he 
did his own tossing. Remember that Mr. Akard's run of 15,000 targets was unfinished. Mr. Akard is now giving demon- 
strations on the Coast. 

U. M. C. CARTRIDGES EXCEL IN CLEANLINESS AND ACCURACY 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Write to M. HARTLEY COMPANY, Sole Representative 
313-315 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 




A RECORD THAT IS A RECORD 

Adolph Topperwein makes Straight runs of 14,540, 13,599, 13,292 and 13,219 on 2V4-inch 
wooden blocks at 20 foot rise, and misses only 4 out of 50,000 and 9 out of 72,500, shooting 

WINCHESTER 

SMOKELESS POWDER CARTRIDGES AND .22 CALIBER RIFLES 

Just to show that all things ARE POSSIBLE with Winchester .22 Caliber Cartridges and 
Rifles, and also to prove "Who's Who" in making rifle records IN PUBLIC, Mr. Topper- 
wein recently shot for ten consecutive days at San Antonio, Texas, and made the above 
world's records for wing shooting with a rifle. He used only two rifles and loaded them 
himself. These record-breaking, history-making scores were made, without the aid of a 
notary public, before large crowds of people in a public park — not in a far-away back lot 
or down on the farm behind the barn. 



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Pacific Coast Branch: Phil R. Bekeart Co, 717 Market St, San Francisco 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 



$10 Due Saturday, February 1st, 1908 

and must be made not later than that date 

On Three- Year-Olds 

IN THE 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 5, $7,000 

For Foals born 1905 — Race to take place 1908 
Three- Year-Old Division Stake Divided 



$3,000 For Three-Year-Old Trotters 
200 For Nominator of .Dam of 

W.inner of Three-Year-Old Trot. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot 

when mare was bred. 



$1,000 For Three-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 For Nominator of Dam of 

Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
100 To Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace 

when mare was bred. 



Last Payment Before Starting Payment. Be Sure to Make It. 

Address all communications and remit by check, postal order, 
Wells-Fargo Express, or registered letter to 

E. P. HEALD, F. W. KELLEY, Secretary. 

President. P. O. Drawer 447, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Office 366 Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 

CAPITAL $3,000,000 SURPLUS $3,200,000 

The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the fire of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in fire and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 

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Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 

prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 



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McMurray - McMurray 




Four more in 2:16 have already been credited this season to 



"McKINNEY" 2.11V4 



Making his wonderful list still more remarkable. 



SoYihisV^'.The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The Stallion Number 



OF THE 



Breeder and Sportsman 



AN' ill be issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 



If You Own a Stallion 



Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number will reach every man on the 
Coast who owns a good mare. 



If You Own a Mare 



"You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
tain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 



If so, you will be interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will be valuable and 
entertaining. 



In place of getting out the usual large Christinas 
number of the BREEDER and S torts m an last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February 15th was selected 
as Christmas comes too early for an issue of this descrip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wish illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. AVrite 
for price and particulars. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET. Proprietor 
Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 Pacific Building, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Tear $3: Six Months $1.76; Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications rfiust be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



AN EXCELLENT PROGRAM of purses has been 
arranged and is advertised this week by the Pa- 
cific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association 
for its August meeting this year. In addition to the 
four races of the Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes 
to be decided at this meeting, the following purses 
have been offered: 

For Trotters— 2:10 class, $1,000; 2:14 class, $800; 
2:20 class (California Stake) $2,000; 2:1? class, 
$800; Four-year-olds, 2:20 class, $500. 

For Pacers — 2:05 class, $1,000; 2:08 class, $800; 
2:14 class, $800; 2:20 class, Pacific State Stakes, 
$2,000. 

The date of closing entries to all the above named 
purses is set for Wednesday, April 1st, horses to be 
named at time of closing. Two horses may be named 
from the same stable by the payment of one per 
cent additional, but only one can be started. 

The program is an excellent one and has been ar- 
ranged so as to accommodate as many horses as 
possible and should attract a large entry list. We 
hope other associations in California will now ar^ 
range programs, select dates and announce them 
early, so that horse owners may decide what horses 
to keep in training. The outlook for a good season 
in California is first class so far as farm products 
are concerned, and with half an effort on the part 
of those who direct the management of the different 
trotting tracks in California, a good and successful 
circuit of harness racing can be given 



THE APPELLATE COURT, sitting at Los Ange- 
les, has rendered a decision which holds it to be 
the duty of automobilists to look out for pedestrians 
and keep from running them down. A track oiler 
named Stanley King had been run down and badly 
injured by an automobile driven by E. K. Green. 
King brought suit for damages and got a verdict for 
$7,000 in the Superior Court. Green appealed the 
case and made the plea that King was guilty of 
contributory negligence, as it was his duty to be 
on the lookout for automobiles and other vehicles. 
The Appelate Court sustained the verdict of the 
lower court, and held that it was the duty of the 
drivers of autos and other vehicles to keep a look- 
out for pedestrians and to avoid running over them. 
The courts all over the country are holding that 
pedestrians have some rights that the automobilists 
must respect. 



Fred Helwig, who is at the head of the Helwig 
Meat Company owns a Zolock filly that has a stake 
winner for a dam, and Henry Helman who is going 
to break the filly pretty soon, says she will be 
faster than her mother, and Helman drove the 
mother fast enough to win a $1,000 stake with her 
when she was a three-year-old. Mr. Helwig, who 
supplies the meat for the construction gangs working 
on the Western Pacific Railway in Niles canyon, says 
they eat a beef a day, and it keeps him rustling 
to get enough to supply the demand. 



When the Grand Circuit trotter Turley 2:07% 
was struck off to Dr. R. C. McCully, at the closing 
out sale of F. G. Jones' stable, last fall, a great many 
horsemen wondered where the old campaigner was 
going. It now turns out that he was bought for C. 
K. G. Billings, who is using him as a saddle horse 
in Central Park. He is a fine looking bay gelding, 
siteen hands high, and is said to be a perfect riding 
horse. He is probably the fastest trotter ever used 
for saddle purposes. In the three years that Ed. 
Geers campaigned him he won nearly $20,000, and 
was only twice behind the money. 



The gamblers that Governor Folk drove out of 
St. Louis do not seem to be meeting with much suc- 
cess in their efforts to transplant the "game" in 
Detroit. That community has never permitted them 
to hold a running meeting at the Grosse Pointe 
course, for which the "Cella confederacy" outbid the 
Detroit Driving Club at the foreclosure sale a year 
or two ago. Trotting meetings with poolselling and 
bookmaking have gone on unmolested at the same 
track, but these lasted only six days, instead of 
thirty. They were not run for revenue only, and 
they were managed and patronized by representative 
citizens, D. J. Campau being the president of the 
Driving Club. This year the Cella crowd refused 
to hold a trotting meeting at the Grosse Pointe 
track, and themselves made overtures for dates in 
the Grand Circuit. These they were unable to ob- 
tain. With the resourcefulness of an experienced 
political manager, Mr. Campau checkmated them by 
transferring the annual "Blue Rippon Meeting" of 
the Driving Club to the fair grounds track in Detroit, 
and according to the present outlook the Grosse 
Potnte course will remain -idle, a white elephant on 
the hands of its owners. 



The death of the noted thoroughbred stallion 
Pietermaritzburg, at Buenos Ayres, Argentina, a 
few days ago, draws attention to the growing im- 
portance of the South American republic as a field 
for horse racing and racehorse breeding. In the 
last few years the Argentines have paid in England 
$170,000 for Val d'Or, $150,000 for Diamond Jubilee, 
$100,000 for Pietermaritzburg, $90,000 for Kendal and 
but little less fabulous sums several other thorough- 
bred stock horses. There are now about two thou- 
sand thoroughbred mares in the Argentine stud 
book, and nearly one thousand colts are raised an- 
nually. About six thouasnd horses were raced last 
year at 110 meetings for stakes and purses aggre- 
gating $3,000,000, while six hundred thousand spec- 
tators wagered $50,000,000 on the result of seven 
hundred and fifty races run. 



As the result of two years' breeding at the Fort 
Collins experimental station of the Department of 
Agriculture there are now thirty-one colts and fillies 
of the trotting bred coach horse type on the farm. 
All are by the Government stallion Cannon, better 
known to Eastern horse fanciers as Thunder Cloud, 
of Thomas W. Lawson's show stable. Colorado 
horsemen say they are uniformly handsome, showing 
the beauty as well as the action and speed of their 
sire. 

In a letter to the American Horse Breeder, James 
Y. Gatcomb, owner of Audubon Boy 1:59%, sug- 
gests an innovation in harness racing which Grand 
Circuit track managers would do well to consider 
if they expect either the horse owners or the public 
to liberally support the trotting meetings. Directing 
attention to the hardships and the hollow contests 
growing out of the existing system of entering horses 
in the spring and racing them all summer in the 
same class, Mr. Gatcomb advocates a uniform pro- 
gram of early closing races for all meetings in the 
circuit and a provision in the conditnons governing 
entries, that when a horse has won in the slower 
class he shall progress to a faster class at the next 
meeting by operation of the rules, and so effect a 
fresh grouping of the trotters, besides affording an 
opportunity for the previously beaten horses to 
win. Amateur reinsmen will recognize the vrinciple 
involved as one which has been tried with general 
satisfaction at the matinees for several years. 

SCARED AT SOUTHERN SPEED. 



Pleasanton, January 29th, 1908. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman: — Since reading 
Jack Fronefield's report of the tremendous speed 
being shown by the trotters and pacers at Los An- 
geles and other southern towns, the trainers here at 
Pleasanton are looking a little pale around the gills 
and some of them are thinking of turning all their 
horses out and not trying for the purses on the cir- 
cuit this season; 2:10 doesn't seem to be anything 
for a trotter or pacer down there, and quarters in 
30 seconds are too common to be worth mentioning 
more than casually. 

Since reading about those Los Angeles flyers, I 
am more pleased than ever that I sold my pacer, al- 
though I still believe he will beat 2:10 as a three- 
year-old. Yours truly, 

THE HORSE SHOER. 

o 

THE MORGAN HORSE. 



I have been a breeder and admirer of the Morgan 
horse for the past twenty years, and have read 
everything I know of regarding them. 

Justin Morgan, the founder of the Morgan family 
of horses was foaled at Springfield, Mass., in 1789 
and carried to Randolph, Vermont, in 1793 by his 
owner and breeder, Mr. Justin Morgan, and was 
kept in service as a stallion in this State until his 
death at the age of thirty-two. Justin Morgan was 
practically a thoroughbred. 

His sire, True Britton, a thoroughbred, was cap- 
tured from Col. Jas. DeLancy, an officer of the 
British army in the war of the Revolution at King's 
Bridge, near New York City, and ridden within the 
American lines at White Plains. 

His dam was a daughter of Diamond by Churches' 
Wildair, a famous thoroughbred. In color Justin 
Morgan was a bay with black joints and heavy 
black mane and tail. He was about fifteen hands 
high and weighed 1,000 pounds — a bunch of bone, 
muscle and sinew placed together in most graceful 



curves. It was said of him that he could outwalk, 
run or trot, and outpull any horse of his weight in 
his day. No other horse has added so much to the 
American breeds— the Standard Bred and the Saddle 
Horse as Justin Morgan, and the greater portion of 
the famous ones carry some of the blood of Justin 
Morgan in their veins. The Morgans are more 
prepotent than any other breed of horses, and the 
Morgan stallion that carries only one-sixteenth of 
the blood of Justin Morgan will stamp his charact- 
eristics on his progeny with greater certainty than 
and other horses in existence. It matters 
not how many years they have been bred pure, or 
in straight line.* 

The Morgan is an all purpose horse; he can work 
the plow or wagon every day in the week and step 
along with the carriage or buggy on Sunday at a 
clip that cannot be surpassed by the best of them. 

They have longer lives and have greater endurance 
than any other breed of horses. I have Morgan 
horses that have worked constantly on the farm 
for fifteen years whose legs are as smooth as colts' 
and if you give them a few months' rest they step 
higher and prouder at this age than three-year-olds 
of some breeds. 

Tn size the Morgan horse has been bred much 
larger than formerly in the past twenty years and 
to-day they range from fifteen to sixteen hands in 
height and weigh 1,000 to 1,350 pounds, yet have all 
of the style, snap and endurance of the original 
Morgans. I know of Morgan stallions of the latter 
weight that will drive fifty miles in a day, repeat it 
several days in succession and come in with their 
heads and tails up as they started out; yet are so 
gentle and tractable that any lady can drive and 
manage them. The Morgan horse is long in the 
body — though extremely short in the back, owing 
to his great length of hip and siope of shoulder. 
His chest is broad and his legs well set apart with 
a greater heart girth than any other family of horses 
for their size. 

The Morgan horse has a lean head of medium 
size, straight in front and broad between and above 
the eyes, indicating his wonderful sense and cour- 
age. His eyes — generally hazel in color — are prom- 
inent; his ears medium in size and well set apart. 
In color they are bay, chestnut, brown and black. 
A book on Morgan horses was published by D. C. 
Linsley of Middlebury, Vermont, in 1857, after which 
time the Morgans were somewhat neglected until 
1884 when the Hon. Joseph Bartell of the same place 
began collecting data for our present "Morgan 
Horse and Register," so ably gotten up by him. 
Two volumes have been issued and the third is ex- 
pected soon. The interest in Morgans has been very 
much revived in recent years, between five and six 
thousand have been registered up to the present, and 
the number will increase very fast in the future. 

Within the past five years the national government 
has started two breeding stations for the breeding 
of distinctly American horses. The first in Colorado 
was started with a band of large standard bred 
mares, with Carmon, the famous stallion, formerly 
owned by Tom Lawson of Boston, at its head, for 
the purpose of establishing a purely American breed 
of carriage or coach horses. Carmon has a Morgan 
cross in him. The other and second station was 
started in Vermont for the purpose of breeding 
Morgan horses, on which they have placed the best 
Morgan blood that could be found. 

I will close with a few extracts from articles by 
eminent horsemen on the Morgan horse. Mr. James 
D. Ladd, in an article in Wallace's Monthly, August, 
1882, after telling of seeing General Gifford, Black 
Hawk and Green Mountain Morgan, three famous 
Morgan stallions at the New York State Fair, speaks 
of them as follows: "I have been with horses from 
childhood. I was familiar with the best horses of 
Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Ohio, but .in 
these I saw what impressed me as the most horse to 
the inches T had ever seen, and from that day to 
this T have known a Morgan horse wherever I have 
met them. T cannot say so of any other family of 
horses, not only so, but whenever I have used him 
T have found the same form, the same condition, the 
same disposition, the same general character. I 
see horses every day with perhaps a thirty-second 
part of the blood of Justin Morgan, but then it is 
predominating, there is the Morgan still so plainly 
seen that he who runs may read. Every close ob- 
server, every discriminating judge of horses I meet, 
be he an admirer or a despiser of the Morgan, al- 
ways admits this wonderful tendency of the blood." 

Mr. J. H. Wallace, in his "Wallace's Monthly," 
says of the Morgan horse: "In the relations, duties 
and pleasures of the road and family horse, the 
Morgan has never had his equal in this country, no 
difference what the blood." 

The veteran horseman, Mr. W. H. H. Murray, says: 
"The Morgans are the very best embodiment of 
every quality and characteristic which is called for 
in a roadster. In them the poetry of equine nature 
and motion is expressed and set to music. Tn action 
they make a heroic appearance and their hoofs beat 
melody from the path. In them is dash and shine 
and rythm. They strike the road with the same ner- 
vous stroke with which the pigeon in full career 
strikes the air, and like that tense-winged carrier of 
the sky, they laugh at hills, and mount them with a 
dash of spirited flight." — Dick Scllman, in Farm and 
Ranch. 

o 

Only One "BROMO QUININE." 

That Is LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. Look for the 
signature of E. W. GROVE. Used the world over to 
Cure a Cold in One Day. 25 cents. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 



PROM PASADENA TO FRESNO. 



[J. R. Fronefield.] 

Mr. William Morgan of Pasadena well deserves 
the pood luck — no, the good results that have come 
his way in turning out race horses during the last 
few years. When horses are bred right, fed right 
and handled and trained right the good results ob- 
tained should not be dubbed luck. It isn't fair to 
anyone connected with this business to so express it. 

Under the hand of Frank Williams the horses of 
Iff. Morgan are now all in first-class condition, and 
will soon be moved to Los Angeles, where the 
younger division will be tried out and the older ones 
made ready for the coming campaign. The stables, 
besides several young horses, included the following: 

Era 2:11%, the champion Coast trotter of 1907; 
Sona 2:16, the only unbeaten trotter on the Coast 
last season, starting in three races and winning 
them all; Una K. 2:14% (trial 2:12%); Grace McK. 
2:21%, an own sister to Coney 2:02; and the "bear" 
Queer Knight 2:13%. with a trial of 2:09%. 

Crisis, full brother to Era, has been a mile in 
2:25 with very little work. Signet, a green trotter, 
looks like a good one for next season, and is by Dan- 
ube, out of Nellie K. A yearling colt by Direcho, out 
of Grace McK., has good looks also. A wonderful 
thing about the very handsome trotter Era 2:11%, 
who was timed separately in her Woodland race one 
heat in 2:10, is that she never made a break during 
her entire campaign. She comes by her trotting in- 
stincts naturally, as she is by Zoinbro 2:11, out of 
Nellie K., by Gen. Grant Jr., and that the latter mare 
transmits speed uniformly is shown by the fact that 
besides Era 2:11% she has produced Una K. 2:14%, 
Sona 2:16, Signet (trial 2:24%), and Crisis (trial 
2:25). This last mentioned colt has all the ear- 
marks of a high-class horse. 



Several good horses are at Visalia, where the best 
of roads to jog on can be found at almost any time 
of the year, and the track at Tulare is not far away. 

Mr. L. A. Dollner, the jeweler of Visalia, owns a 
very promising three-year-old stallion by Robert Di- 
rect, out of a mare by Iris, that will be handled for 
speed after making a light season in the stud. 

Dr. C. E. Johnston has four stallions, headed by 
old Iris, sire of Jasper Ayers 2:09, etc. A five-year- 
old son of Iris is a pacer and has been a mile in 
2:20, another is a trotter, a full brother to Jasper 
Avers 2:09. The other stallion is a gaited Kentucky 
saddle horse and a nice one at that. 

Pat Sweeney has Lady R. 2:11% and Mamie S., 
trial (2) 2:22%. Lady R. is due to foal soon to 
Athadon, and Mamie S. is in foal to Robert Direct. 
D. G. Sanders, partner of Sweeney, owns Cuckoo 
2:09%, and is using him as a business horse, so when 
any racing comes off in the valley this horse will be 
ready. He is a nice going pacer and always has 
his step with him. 

J. W. Martin, Supervisor from the Fifth District 
in this county, and a resident of Woodville, owns Mc- 
Kinley, a registered stallion with a standard record, 
that is by McKinney 2:11%, out of Vendome by 
Richard's Elector. This horse has a lot of good colts 
throughout the county that have all the qualities 
necessary to prove him an excellent sire. 

Mr. R. O. Newman has Robert Direct and Best 
Policy, two grandly bred stallions, and a band of 
registered mares. Robert Direct is by Direct 2:05%, 
out of Daisy Basler by Robert Basler 2:05%, Doctor 
W. 2:08%, and of the dams of My Way 2:15% and 
Stonelita (3) 2:15%. He is getting some very fine 
colts here that show great speed. 

Rest Policy is a young horse and a great bred one 
by Allerton 2:09%, sire of 178 1n the list, out of 
Exine by Ex|>edition 2:15%, second dam Euxine, the 
dam of five in the list by Axtell (3) 2:12. This stal- 
lion represents a great combination of the very best 
race winning and record holding blood. The mares 
are Daisy Basler, in foal to Best Policy, Dewdrop 
Basler, dam of Andy Direct (half-mile in 1:13 as a 
yearling), in foal to Best Policy; Elizabeth Direct by 
Robert Direct, in foal to Best Policy; Stonelita 2:15% 
in foal to Robert Direct; Zephyrous by Zombro, out 
of Daisy Basler, in foal to Robert Direct; Ida Stone- 
way by Stoneway, out of Ida May, the dam of Home- 
ward 2:13%, sire of George G. 2:05%, in foal to 
Robert Direct; Peerless Maid, the dam of one with 
a three-year-old record of 2:16%, by Strathway, in 
foal to Robert Direct. These mares are all nominated 
in the Breeders' Futurity and are the kind that im- 
prove the breed of harness horses. 



All things come to those who wait. Hanford is 
to have a mile track. Mr. J. M. Daggs decided re- 
cently that the time had fully arrived when a mile 
track at Hanford would be appreciated by the horse- 
men, and has already set to work in earnest with 
eighty head of the best mules and equipment to be 
found in this or any other State, on a site about a 
mile west of town and close to the old half-mile track. 
The entire plot has been plowed, leveled and sur- 
veyed, and Mr. Daggs guarantee is out that the en- 
tire plant will be as good as the best when com- 
pleted. If his dairy plant and mule stables on his 
farm are any criterion of what he will build, all can 
rest assured and "leave it to him." A stable ac- 
commodating 104 head, all well ventilated, neatly 
kept and lighted by electricity, is no mean country 
stable. 

Good trotters and pacers are thick in this valley, 
and plenty of the necessary enthusiasm abounds. Mr. 
Daggs has one standard mare, Pansy, dam of Lady 
Ragan 2:18 and Gateway 2:12%, that is a regular 
breeder. She is now in foal to Del Coronado 2:09%. 



Moody Liggett is working a stable of seven 
head, and has charge of Expressive Mac. the grandly 
bred stallion by McKinney 2:11%, out of Expressive 
(3) 2:12%, by Electioneer. The bunch in training 
are all youngsters, two and three-year-olds by Doctor 
W., Glenway. Jonesa Basler and Athby, and show 
lots of natural speed. 

P. C. Byrne has three, including the stallion Bill- 
ups 2:20% by Boydell, that is owned by J. L. Davis 
of Colusa county, J. W. McNeer by McNeer. a son of 
McKinney, out of a mare by Venture 2:27, and a 
three-year-old filly by Glenway 2:17%, out of Lady 
Anna by Sidney Arnett, sire of Joe Wheeler 2:07%. 

Moody Liggett and G. D. Young own a very prom- 
ising two-year-old gelding by Doctor W. This colt 
with little handling has been a quarter in 46 seconds 
and is gaited like a fast trotter. 

Lloyd Trewhitt and William Bernstein are enter- 
prising horsemen of Hanford, who breed, train and 
handle show class roadsters and saddle horses. A 
real good one can be found in their stables at any 
time. 

W. R. McKay, the horseshoer of Hanford, is inter- 
ested in the game and drives regularly a promising 
three-year-old filly that is a square trotter and bred 
to make good, being by Athadon, out of a mare by 
Apex, second dam by Sidney Arnett. 

Miss Idaho 2:09%, owned by Mr. S. C. Kimball, 
one of the leading business men of Hanford, is win- 
tering at the stables of Anderson & Taylor on 
Seventh street. The mare is looking fine as silk, 
getting regular light exercise, and an occasional 
pleasure spin to road wagon, driven by her owner. 

W. Smalley was unfortunate recently in having a 
promising four-year-old gelding shot about the head 
while at pasture, causing the probable loss of an 
eye. The gelding is by Strathway, out of a mare 
by Nicodemus, son of St. Nicholas. Mr. Smalley has 
a few well bred and handsome youngsters by Ham- 
bletonian Wilkes. The get of this horse has had 
much to do with improving the trotting stock of this 
section, and his death was a loss to the community. 

P. M. Richardson has Stamboulet 2:10%, by Stam- 
boul, out of Lady Escott 2:26%, the dam also of 
Ellert 2:11. This horse will make the season at 
Hanford. A two-year-old by him here is very hand- 
some and very promising. 



At Fresno, H. L. Parady is working a stable of 
eight. A two-year-old filly by California Guide, out 
of a mare by Athadon, is a nice going pacer. A 
chestnut stallion by Lynwood W., out of a mare by 
Dawn, has been a mile in 2:26 as a three-year-old, 
with the last quarter in 33 seconds. A two-year-old 
filly by Lustredon, son of Athadon, is a nice trotter 
that is learning fast. 

G. C. Owens is working two head. Nettie T. 2:35 
by Milton Gear, out of a mare by Nephew, has been 
a mile in 2:15, with the last half in 1:04, and the 
last quarter in 29 seconds. She will be raced and 
should make it interesting for the green pacers. Lo- 
leta, a two-year-old filly by Zolock 2:05%, out of 
Stonelita (3) 2:15%, shows an inclination to pace, 
but will probably trot by the time the real racing 
begins. She is well staked and will be given every 
chance. She is owned by Dr. Johnston of Visalia. 

J. W. Zibbell & Son have twenty-one heal of horses 
in their stables, including the youngsters, and these 
are the ones that seem up to the races right now. 
The older division is going easy. Adam G. 2:11%, 
Fresno Girl 2:10%, Diabless 2:11 and Katalina 2:22%, 
last year's winner of the two-year-old division of 
the Breeders' Futurity, and her every start, have 
been jogging since the first of the year, and are all 
in fine condition. They have four green trotters that 
have been miles lately around 2:25 and 2:20. In 
this lot is the mare Lady Seymour, that was re- 
cently bought for Mr. George Estabrook of Denver. 
I had the pleasure of a ride behind this mare, and 
really consider her an impressive trotter, as a 2:20 
shot is very simple for her. In a bunch of five green 
pacers the one that stands out by herself is the 
half-sister to The Donna 2:07% and Queen Pomona 
2:07%. She worked a full mile this week in 2:24, 
last quarter in 32 seconds, and she squares away 
like a real fast one. In the colt division are three 
pacers and two trotters. Two of the pacers are by 
Diablo 2:09%, and one by Kohlan King, son of Simmi- 
colon. They have" all been quarters in from 37% to 
40 seconds. One of the colt trotters is an own 
brother to last year's Futurity winner, Katalina 
2:22%, and is a lusty colt that shows more than 
the sister with the same amount of work. The other 
was christened "Shags" on account of his trampy 
looks when brought in from the farm, six weeks 
ago, but it is different now. He has taken on looks, 
manners and race horse airs, and the best is none too 
good for "Shags" since he has stepped a quarter 
in 36 seconds, well in hand. He is a full brother to 
the Estabrook mare and they are a good pair to 
draw to. A three-year-old full brother that every- 
body about the track is talking about and none seem 
to know the real owner of can trot, and no mistake. 
The Zibbells have also in their stables the stallion 
Advertisor, son of Advertiser 2:15, and the pride of 
the stable, Tom Smith 2:13% by McKinney. 

Out at the home farm, Mr. Geo. L. Warlow has 
Stanford McKinney, Athablo and Athadon, three as 
fine stallions as can be found anywhere. Nogi (3) 
2:17%, winner of all the three-year-old stakes last 
year, is still enjoying the freedom of his paddock, 
and is big and fat, but his work will soon be cut 
out for him. Schuyler Walton does not hesitate to 
say that he really never had so much good timber 
for the colt stakes in his stables as he has this 
winter. He has fourteen head, with more to come 



later. A two-year-old colt by Athadon, out of Bes- 
sie, is developed like one a year older, has been 
been a quarter in 40 seconds at the trot, with an 
eighth in 19 seconds. He is owned by C. H. Warlow, 
and is entered in all the stakes. Silenta, a two-year- 
old by Stanford McKinney, out of Sextette, is a sure 
pacer, can show a 2:20 shot now and is turned right 
for a record breaker. 

Parana, another two-year-old by Stanford McKin- 
ney out of Strathalie by Strathway, second dam 
Athalie, dam of Athonio 2:10, Athadon (1) 2:27, Ira 
2:10%, and four more in the list, represents a combi- 
nation of trotting blood from which something extra 
good has resulted. 

Directrine is a green trotter by Direct 2:05%, out 
of Donnatrine by Athadon, that has shown good 
enough to take to the races, and will be one of the 
mainstays of the string this year. 

A three-year-old filly by Sidney Arnett, out of a 
mare by Starboul, also shows fast at the trot and 
will be given every chance. 

A good looker is a two-year-old filly by Kinney 
Lou 2:00%. She is entered in several stakes, and 
promises to be one that will be ready to race. 

The pacing brigade will have a fast one in the 
two-year-old colt by Diablo 2:09%, out of Edna R. 
2:11%, and notice is served right now for the boys 
to keep their eyes open for this fellow. 

Sadie B., the two-year-old full sister to The Donna 
2:07%, seems to be an exact counterpart of that 
fast mare except that Sadie is a trotter. 

An Athadon two-year-old of wonderful size, out of 
a mare by Eclectic, own brother to Arion 2:07%, 
can trot and' looks like a good, big prospect. As a 
rule the Athadon's never lack size. 

Miss Dividend, the two-year-old that raced well last 
year wiH fill her three-year-old stake engagements 
this season. She should be among the money win- 
ners. 

Topsy is a green pacer that has been a mile in 
2:17, last half in 1:08, last quarter in 32 seconds, 
and will be raced this season. 

Mr. D. L. Buchant is wintering Athasham 2:09% 
(the fastest five-year-old trotter of 1907), at the farm, 
and the war horse of the Grand Circuit is looking 
his best. He will make a season in the stud and 
most likely race again this season, as he is sound 
as a bullet. The horses at the farm are under the 
care of Chas. Middleton, and get regular road work. 

Joe Depoister will make a season with Milton 
Gear 2:16% at the Fresno race track. This stallion 
took his record last fall and several of his get are 
showing great speed. Nettie I. by him, has been 
a mile in 2:15 over a slow track, and has paced a 
quartervin 29 seconds. Milton Gear won three races 
the week he took his record. 

o 

AEROLITE IN THE STUD. 



The four-year-old stallion Aerolite, that was the 
sensational three-year-old pacer of 1907, will be in 
the stud this year at Pleasanton, limited to twenty 
mares, and we predict right now that his book will 
be full before the season is more than fairly opened. 
All our readers know of his two and three-year-old 
performances, of his taking a race record of 2:15%, 
when winning the Breeders' Futurity as a two-year- 
old, and one of 2:11% when winning the Petaluma 
stake for three-year-olds, the largest stake for three- 
year-old pacers on the Coast, last year. Then after 
his engagements he paced a public trial in 2:05% 
over the Woodland track, equalling the world's 
record for that age and showing his ability to pace 
much faster had he been driven out. He is a perfect 
horse without a blemish or a fault, goes without 
hopples and is a race horse from his head to his 
heels. His breeding is of the best, as he is by the 
great Searchlight 2:03%, his dam by Nutwood 
Wilkes, his grandam by Director, and thence on 
through strains of those great pacing sires Flaxtail 
and Blue Bull to good thoroughbred blood of race 
winning kind. 

Aerolite's owner, James W. Marshall, of Dixon, 
has made the terms for this great young horse's 
services not only liberal but fair. The fee will be 
$50, and if mare fails to get with foal, $40 will be 
returned to the owner. These terms are so liberal 
that there will be little or no trouble in filling his 
book with the names of choice mares. Aerolite will 
be in the hands of Sutherland & Chadbourne, of 
Pleasanton, who have trained him since a colt. 
Good pasture will be furnished at $5 per month. 
o 

ABSORBING INCREASED COLT'S VALUE $50. 



Mr. Joseph Crooker, Kingman, Me., writes under date 
of November 26, 1907: "1 got my local dealer to send 
to you for a bottle of Absorbine and used it with great 
results. I had a colt that had a bunch on the hock 
joint, and your Absorbine cured it so there is not a 
blemish to be seen on her now. My colt will sell for 
$50 more to-day than she would before I used Ab- 
sorbine." 

Now is the time to get your stock In proper condi- 
tion for the season's work or for the sale. A lame, 
blemished horse can be made sound and smooth with 
Absorlune without laying up the horse. No blister, no 
hair gone. 

Look over your stock to-day, so that when the horse 
buyers are searching your country you will have good, 
sound stock, and get a price accordingly. Absorbine 
cures lameness, kills pain, removes bog spavins, 
thoroughpins. splints, wind puffs, shoe boils, enlarged 
glands and similar bunches in a mild, pleasant manner. 
Two dollars per bottle at all druggists, or express pre- 
paid upon receipt of price. W. F. Young, P. D. F., 54 
Monmouth St., Springfield, Mass. 

O 

The Mid-Winter Horse Auction opened this week 
at Madison Square Garden, New York, with nearly 
500 horses catalogued. 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



HAS ANOTHER CALF EXPERIENCE. 



W. J. Speers presented himself at the office of 
the Breeder and Sportsman last Saturday wth a set 
of badly bowed tendons. He has had another terrible 
calf experience, two calves this time, however, with 
no ears. The editor not being in, Mr. Speers left 
the following characteristic note: 

"I have just ridden across the Santa Cruz moun- 
tains on Belle W., delivering her to Mr. S. B. 
Wright of Santa Rosa at the home of Mr. Brace at 
San Jose. It's the first horseback ride in twenty 
years. My action would suggest that I had been 
using spreaders. Next trip I make on horseback I 
expect to use pneumatic pants. I walked the last 
three miles of my journey. It has been my habit for 
a number of years to nod a salute to every person 
I meet, and as I saluted one man on the outskirts 
of Santa Cruz, he said: 'How do you do, sir?' I re- 
plied: 'I don't care to discuss the situation, sir.' My 
one object in getting the saddle back to my mountain 
ranch is that I may be able to break up any setting 
hen that may give me confusion in future. 

"A word about Belle W.: I have owned her for 
two months and a half and if anyone may be inter- 
ested in the temperament of the dam of Bolivar 
2:00% I would say she is one of the most amiable 
and faithful animals I have ever owned, a rugged, 
strong, powerful mare, though high spirited, very 
gentle, and I found her serviceable in the saddle, 
single harness or double harness, wherever placed. 

She stands 15.2% hands, weighs 1,200 pounds and 
is the last beast that will be picked as the mother 
of such a pacer as Bolivar 2:00%. I doubt if there 
is an expert breeder in the United States, looking 
at this mare in repose, who would select this rugged, 
strong boned, heavy chested, big footed, lazy walking 
mare to be the dam of the invincible Bolivar, but 
when called upon to pull a load or climb a hill the 
arch of that neck and the snap of that eye would 
suggest possibilities. To me nature is an unknown 
quantity. I would not pretend to be able to select 
the choicest producers. I can only be guided by 
what weak judgment I have and the paths that other 
men have trod. I shall expect to hear of her dupli- 
cating such a horse as Bolivar, as she has passed 
into the hands of one of the greatest breeders in 
the State, Mr. Wright. The lightning movements 
of this mare when called upon prove to me the won- 
derful nerve force she possesses. 

"I have just visited the Santa Clara track, and find 
three very promising young stallions working there, 
two sired by Greco B. and one by Guy McKinney, all 
three showing varied but beautiful action. 

"There is a possibility and prospect of something 
doing in Santa Cruz, I am glad to say, as a county 
fair is being agitated. Will report to you later on 
this matter." 

W. J. SPEERS. 
o 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY DRIVING CLUB. 



At a well attended meeting of members of the 
San Joaquin Valley Driving Club, held at Jury's 
hall, on Monday evening, January 20th, the follow- 
ing officers and directors were elected to constitute 
the Board of Directors for the ensuing year: 

A. B. Sherwood (Manager of the Flint & Bigelow 
Co.), President 

F. W. Johnson (Deputy County Clerk), First Vice- 
President. 

G. F. Wille (Agent for F. J. Ruhstaller), Second 
Vice-President. 

F. A. Murray (Horse Shoer), Treasurer. 

Frank Lieginger (Proprietor of the Ooodell Trans- 
fer Co.,), Secretary. 

Directors: A. W. Cowell (Contractor); A. L. 
Archambeault (Manager of the United Harness Co.); 
George Harrison (Farmer and Breeder); W. H. 
Miller (Conductor in the employ of S. P. R. R. Co.); 
Frank Donovan (Proprietor of the Blake Transfer 
Co.); Chas. Helms (Trainer and Breeder). 

The election being over, a recess was granted 
and all retired to the banquet hall where a good 
spread was enjoyed. 

After the banquet regular business was resumed 
and the proposed new By-Laws were read and the 
meeting adjourned until Monday, January 27th, at 
8 P. M. 

FRANK LIEGINGER, Secretary, 
24 W. Weber Avenue, 

Stockton, Cal. 

o 

There should be some fast time at the matinee of 
the Los Angeles Driving Club to-day. The feature 
will be a free-for-all pace, in which will be seen 
Seigfried, Silver Dick and Cleopatra, and as each 
of these stepped a mile in 2:12 at the last matinee, 
their meeting should furnish some exciting sport. 
Silver Dick has already won two legs of the $200 
Clark cup, and his owner needs but one more win- 
ning to make the trophy his property. Several new 
club members will make their debut. W. E. Morris 
of Montana will start two new ones. One of these 
is a pacer, with a mark of 2:12, that has been con- 
verted into a trotter and recently stepped a quarter 
in 32 seconds at the new gait. Another new mem- 
ber, Jake Levy, of Albuquerque, will start his horse 
Shecam, which has a record of 2:12%. 



The Marvsville papers are advocating the holding 



FROM GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. 



Breeder and Sportsman: — There are more harness 
horses being worked and trained in Montana than 
any year since the death of Marcus Daly, whose 
Bitter Root Farm was the home or birth-place of 
many great trotters, stallions and broodmares. The 
boys in Great Falls are coming to the front as owners 
of good roadsters and track horses. 

Thomas Couch has six head at the track which 
are under the charge of his trainer, Mr. Smith. 

They are the stallion Tom Cou; h 14,493, that was 
bred at Larabee's Brook Nooke Ranch, and is a 
producing sire. 

Tommie Afteon, a four-year-old colt by Tom Couch, 
is a trotter and a good prospect. 

Ben Walker is the name that has been given a 
three-year-old trotter by Montanus 2:17%. 

There are also two or three green ones in this 
string that have not had much work as yet, but 
will be regularly handled later on. 

Herman Johnson has a green trotter by Senator 
H., dam Olga B. by Tom Couch, and she is always 
right up there where he asks her to go when taking 
her work. Johnson also has Directus J. by Montana 
Director. 

Mr. E. Z. Rierachel owns a grand young trotter by 
Tom Couch, out of Adwilta by Advertiser. William 
Splan is jogging her and others belonging to Mr. 
Rierachel in town and on the roads. 

Mr. D. McFalls has Flor Direct 2:13% pacing, and 
has put her to trotting; she shows up well. A three- 
year-old pacing filly called Dolly Dimple is a good 
one, and an eight months old colt by Directus J., 
that can step a quarter in 44 seconds. What do you 
think of this one? 

Mr. Jinks is working a green trotter by Phall, 
Mr. Little is working a filly by Bozeman that looks 
like a sure trotter, and Mr. F. Van de Putte is work- 
ing Fitzsimmons by Simmons. 

Burns & Cullen own some of the finest bred 
youngsters in the State, and McCullen is devoting 
all his time and attention to them. There are five of 
them and they look like winners. They also have 
Gold Finder, he by Hal Ensign. Others in the stable 
are Sugar Beets by Ponce de Leon, dam Sally Popp, 
one of the Majcus Daly prize mares, Whitelark, a 
green trotter by Danhope, and Chevy Walcott, a 
green pacer by Danhope. 

There are other well-bred horses owned in this 
vicinity, but I will have to defer notice of them to 
another time. Yours truly, 

SPECTATOR. 

o 

TRACK WILL BE BUILT AT CHICO. 



The good news has reached us that after two 
months of negotiations, the deal between the Chico 
Driving Association and J. F. Entler for the purchase 
of sixty acres of land south of that city for the es- 
tablishment of a race track, athletic grounds and 
training quarters, has been settled and the transfer 
was formally made January 20th. Work will be 
commenced on the grounds as soon as the present 
stormy weather ceases, and they will be available 
for training purposes this spring, and for a race 
meet next fall. 

This cheerful news was given out Saturday night 
after a meeting of the association in the afternoon. 
An agreement was reached wheTeby a part of the 
purchase price is made in cash at once, the remain- 
der to be in installments. 

The tract is situated one mile south of Chico, 
immediately adjacent to the Butte County Railroad 
and Northern Electric lines, and the best of trans- 
portation facilities are afforded. Since the old San- 
born racing track was subdivided into Barber lots, 
Chico has been without a track. 

o 

Hon. H. A. Jastro of California was elected presi- 
dent of the National Live Stock Association at the 
meeting held in Denver last week. 



It is probable that colts from the Government 
breeding farm in Colorado will be exhibited at the 
Chicago International Show this year. The oldest 
of the colts are yearlings. 



Red Bow 2:00%, the pacing mare that Dick Mc- 
Mahan has secured for his stable, looks like a real 
crack for the; 2:10 classes. She raced well the past 
season, her campaign having been largely over half- 
mile tracks. At Dayton, Ohio, she made her best 
minor track performance, winning in 2:10%, 2:10%, 
2:09%. 



Secretary Ilanrahan of the Windsor, Ont., Asso- 
ciation announces that they will give a big meeting 
on the Canadian side preceding Detroit in the Grand 
Circuit. 



Friends of Henry Titer, who is on his way to Rus- 
sia, and has probably now reached his destination in 
the Southern Crimea, state that while the passage 
from New York to Hamburg was a rough one, both 
he and the $15,000 colt, Blue Hill 2:15%, arrived at 
the latter point in good condition. 



Five record sons of Bingen are now owned across 
the water, viz: Codero 2:09%, Captain Bacon 2:10%, 
Gay Bingen 2:12%, Lord Revelstoke 2:12%, and 
Blue Hill 2:15%. There Is also over there a non- 
record son of Bingen and the trotting mare Totara 



PLEA FOR PATRIOTISM. 



The following, which appeared as an editorial in 
the Chicago Horseman of last week, should be read 
by every American: 

The breeders of no animals in America have as 
good a right to make a plea for patriotism as those 
who breed the trotting horse, for the good reason 
that the American trotting horse is the only breed of 
animals on American soil that is the product of 
American breeding genius Within a period of time 
not beyond the memory of living men this handsome, 
useful horse has been created and improved until he 
is a part of a special breed group, with breed quali- 
fications. Horsemen are proud of this breeding 
achievement. So are others who are familiar with 
the excellence of the work done. But the great 
American public does not yet quite understand that 
there is such a distinctive American breed group 
as the American trotting horse. And to this great 
public, quite as proud of American achievements as 
are the people of other nations, an appeal should 
go up for that encouragement and support which is 
born of true patriotism. 

Somehow horsemen themselves have not quite 
fully realized what an important piece of Americ- 
anism is a well-bred trotting horse. In a general 
way the truth is acknowledged and advertised 
modestly. But modesty has no place in patriotism. 
School boys will fight if the beauty of our flag is 
questioned. Men of ripe years will forsake home 
and friends to battle for that flag when it is in- 
sulted, and old men will tremblingly wish themselves 
young again that they too might shed their patri- 
otic blood. Our dictinctly American institutions are 
not to be spoken of with a temperance inspired by 
modesty, but in those positive terms which are born 
of patriotism. Our corn yield is the biggest and our 
people the best in the world. It is impossible to 
find a rule of measurement that will prove the con- 
trary to the true American. As a last argument his 
patriotism will make him dispute the rule that 
proves his Americanism at fault. 

We horsemen who really know how great is the 
trotting horse as an American product need just a 
little more patriotism. We are not quite proud 
enough of our horse creation to think about him 
in a way to move our own blood a little faster and 
stir the sluggish blood of our neighbors. Let the 
running horse men worry about the reformers and 
their laws to abolish betting on racing. They have 
good need to worry, for the thoroughbred is largely 
a raring toy, whose existence will be threatened with 
racing toy, whose existence will be threatened with 
the destruction of the pool box. But the trotting 
horse is something more than a mere racing tool, 
and will live and thrive without the betting stim- 
ulus. He has an individuality, distinctly American, 
and besides being a useful animal himself has the 
potential quality for begetting other useful horse 
groups. Only we do not realize this quite as fully 
as we should and we do not preach it from the 
housetops as becomes patriotic Americans, with a. 
distinctly American product, useful in all parts of 
the world. 

In the trotting horse we have a creation that will 
live without the pool box. Perhaps he will do better 
without it. than he will with it. for the sooner we 
get rid of the idea that we need a betting stimulant 
to develop the trotting horse the sooner will we 
stand squarely upon our patriotism and promote 
the trotting horse on his merits as an American 
breed product. Sentiment of the right, kind will 
do more real permanent good for the trotting horse 
than the pool box. 

The Germans and the French are very proud of 
their coach horses, and where is there an Englishman 
who would not quarrel about the quality of the 
great English thoroughbreds? These men have no 
commercial interests in the horses of their country, 
but they are a part of their country and are en- 
titled to patriotic respect after the flag. We have a 
better horse than the thoroughbred and out of our 
trotters we can create a beter horse than the German 
or French coach horse. But the public does not 
quite know the value of our horse product, and as 
American citizens we have not yet learned to Bhoul 
and work patriotically for the American horse, which 
is the trotter. The public must be taught to regard 
the trotting horse as something dictinctly American, 
and when the public gets that idea well fixed in its 
mind there will be good citizens on every street 
corner ready to shout the praises of a praiseworthy 
American creation. 

The feeling among the people at large was very 
well expressed during last season in every part of 
the country where trotters were raced. Successful 
meetings were held without the aid of the pool box, 
and this year plans are afoot to give still more 
meetings without public betting. The public has 
a liking for the trotting horse. This will be in- 
creased if those who are directly interested in the 
trotting horse will appeal to the patriotism of the 
American people by inviting them to witness speed 
contests between horses which are distinctly an 
American creation. Let the plea for patriotism take 
the place of the pool box. 

o 

Mr. Frank Drake of Vallejo writes that he met 
with a great disappointment last November in the 
death of his colt Count Leadbetter from pneumonia. 
This colt was a foal of 1905, and Mr. Drake fully ex- 
pected to see him give a good account of himself In 
the three-year-old stakes this year, as the colt was 
very promising. He was by Count Hannibal, out 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908, 



■j. .j. & .;. 4. .j. 4. + .> •> 4. •:-•!••;< 4. * •:••>•>•:•*••:••>•> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• 

I NOTES AND NEWS ! 

I ? 

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Fred H. Chase & Co. will hold their combination 
sale February 24th. He has thirty head of good 
horses consigned. Catalogues will be out soon. 
Send for one. See his advertisement. , 



The Oregon State Fair will give a big purse for 
a 2:05 class pace this year. Those Oregon folks 
are enterprising and know how to secure attractions 
that will draw the crowd. 



Joe Cuicello was down from Pleasanton this week, 
and is living in hopes that all the associations that 
give harness meetings this year will provide races 
for four-year-olds. He says that there are a large 
number of four-year-olds in training, and from the 
outlook races for this class should fill well. 



If you want a good stock stallion, speed prospect, 
or business horse, be at Fred H. Chase's combina- 
tion sale, February 24th. Thirty head have been 
consigned. This will offer an opportunity to get 
good ones at your own price. 



The name of the full sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05%, 
that is owned by Mr. Geo. A. Pounder of Los Angeles, 
has been printed very often as Lotta Dillon, which 
is incorrect. Lottie Dillon is the correct spelling of 
the filly's name, and those who take occasion to write 
it in the future will please take notice. They say she 
is about the handsomest yearling living. 



The next meeting of the Pacific District Board of 
Appeals, National Trotting Association, will be held 
late in February or early in March. Several cases 
of more than ordinary interest are to come before 
the Board, nearly all of them relating to matters 
that occurred on the circuit last year. 



Kinney Rose, the McKinney stallion out of a 
Falrose mare, owned by William Hashagan of Wood- 
land, is trotting smoothly and with plenty of vim 
for Chas. DeRyder, who will probably take him 
east this year. Kinney Rose raced well through 
the California Circuit last year, and while he did 
not get a record, he was close up several times 
when the heats were in 2:15. He is a fine indi- 
vidual and a good gaited horse. 



Barney Simpson will return to Chico this spring 
with his stallion Arner 2:17%. Now that a track 
is to be built at Chico, Mr. Simpson will have a 
chance to train several colts by his horse that are 
showing great promise. Arner is very popular with 
Butte county breeders and during the past two or 
three years has been bred to a number of high class 
mares there, from which some fast performers should 
certainly come. There are three or four in training 
now that wirl enter the list this year. 



A round barreled, smooth turned pacer by Search- 
light, out of a mare by Guide, turned the Pleasanton 
track in 2:19 last Wednesday, pulled almost to a 
walk on account of another horse being turned in 
front of him in the stretch Lou Crellin bred this 
fellow and sold him to a gentleman named Murray, 
who certainly has a fine prospect. 



The mare Freely Red, owned by Mr. A. G. Dahl, 
that was campaigned up north last year, where she 
took a pacing record of 2:19%, is now in Henry Hel- 
man's string at Pleasanton, and looks as if her mark 
will be pretty close to 2:10 before the summer is 
over. She is by Red Medium 2:23%, a son of Red 
Wilkes that put four new ones in the list last year 
and had three that reduced their records. Another 
one in Helman's string that looks good is a large 
black mare called Carrie S. She is a trotter, green 
as a gourd when she was started up, and in two 
months showed a nice mile in 2:32 without much 
effort. She is by Zombro 2:11 out of Ferina 2:27 
by Montana Wilkes, the dam of Sophie R. 2:14%, 
a mare that raced on the Coast here ten years ago. 
Carie S. is owned by Mr. A. R. Shreve of Cathlamet, 
Washington. 



The announcement of those two grandly bred and 
fast stallions Bonnie Direct 2:05% and Bonnie 
Steinway 2:06% appear in our advertising columns 
this week. They will stand at Pleasanton this 
season, Bonnie Direct at $100 and Bonnie Steinway 
at $40. Both are out of the great broodmare Bon 
Bon by Simmons, one of the very greatest brood- 
mares recorded in the books. Both are magnifi- 
cent individuals, and sire fast, handsome and well 
made colts. Bonnie Direct has already sired one 
in the 2:10 list and that a three-year-old. He is 
destined to be represented by several more 2:10 per- 
formers, as there is not one of his get that has been 
worked but can show a high rate of speed. Bonnie 
Steinway has been in the stud but a short time, 
but his colts all show well. No one can make a mis- 
take in sending good mares to either of these 
stallions. 



Chas. DeRyder purchased this week from the 
estate of James Coffin a piece of pasture land near 
Pleasanton that will make a fine place for the mares 
which are sent to Star Pointer 1:59% and other 
stallions that Mr. DeRyder will handle this year. 



Chas. Towson, the Pleasanton track harness maker, 
has invented a heel salve that all the trainers who 
have used it on their horses say is the best thing 
they ever tried. 



Al Charvo now has charge of Bonnie Direct 
2:05%, and Bonnie Steinway 2:06%, at Pleasanton, 
and will manage them during the stud season for 
their owner Chas. Griffith. Mr. Charvo's trotter, 
Peter Pan by L. W. Russell, out of Biscari, dam of 
of eight in the list, is moving like a winner. He 
worked fast last Wednesday and went smooth and 
easy all the way. 



There will be big money up north this year for 
the trotters and pacers. The Oregon State Fair 
will give two $5,000 stakes and it is said the 
Washington State Fair will do the same thing. If 
the new Portland association gives the big stakes 
talked about, there will be a Grand Circuit in the 
Northwest that will rival the one in the East. 



The Stam B. colt Ben Hur, owned by S. K. Trefry 
of Plasanton, should win some of the four-year-old 
trots this year. He has a world of speed and is 
game enough to race against aged horses. 



Four good young jacks and three large jennies 
are offered for sale. See advertiement. 



When the Western Pacific gets its trains running 
through Pleasanton, its depot will probably be on 
a lot close to the racetrack, and will be very con- 
venient for people visiting the training centre. 



Mr. C. J. Grubb, of the firm of Justice & Grubb, 
who own the fast Allerton stallion, Redlac 2:07%, 
that made a season at Los Angeles last year, was 
in San Francisco last week on his way to Oroville, 
where he will visit his son for a few days before 
returning to Iowa. Mr. Grubb has been looking 
over the horse market in San Francisco and may 
conclude to bring out a few car-loads of business 
horses, for which there is a demand at ordinary 
prices. Should he come, he will probably bring 
Redlac with him, and this magnificent stallion will 
doubtless be well patronized here, as he has many 
admirers. Redlac put five new ones" in the list in 
1907, among them the three-year-old pacer El Red 
2:10%. 



Henry Helman is geting out some nice folders 
for his two stallions, Baron Bowles and Alconda 
Jay. The latter is by Jay Bird, out of a Baron 
Wilkes mare, and Helman is receiving letters nearly 
every day from breeders who ask for a tabulated 
pedigree of the colt. It will tabulate all right, as 
Alconda Jay is one of the best bred colts in the 
United States. 



They say that Capt. Williams' yearling filly by 
Cniniak, now in John Phippen's string at Pleasan- 
ton, is the fastest thing of her age on that track. 
Urfimak is an own brother to Sterling McKinney 
2:09%, the horse that is pointed for the stallion 
record this year. 



Dr. F. A. Ramsey of Riverside met with a severe 
loss January 21st, when his magnificently bred stal- 
lion Baron of Glenwood was found dead in his stall. 
An examination by Dr. Ramsey and another veteri- 
narian showed that the horse died from heart 
failure. Baron of Glenwood was a magnificent indi- 
vidual, coal black, sired by Oakland Baron 2:09%, 
dam Alma Wilkes by Baron Wilkes, second dam 
Almeta by Almont 33, third dam Alma Mater by 
Mambrino Patchen 58. He was bred by Col. R. G. 
Stoner of Paris, Ky., and foaled in 1897. Baron of 
Glenwood was undoubtedly one of the best bred 
horses ever brought to this State, and would have 
made a reputation in the stud. The loss is a severe 
one to Dr. Ramsey, as he had already booked several 
mares for this season, with the prospect of doing a 
large business with him. Baron of Glenwood was 
a half-brother to Henry Helman's young Jay Bird 
stallion, Alconda Jay, both being out of the same 
mare. 



Beside Frank Turner, with his big stable of colts, 
broodmares and stallions, Tom Holmes is the only 
trainer now wintering at the Santa Rosa track. 
Holmes' bunch includes McMyrtle, a McKinney stal- 
lion, that has been a mile in 2:18 for him, a good 
two-year-old by him, that is a trotter, and the two- 
year-old by Lynwood W., out of Maud P., by Idaho 
Patchen, belonging to S. B. Wright. This colt is 
large, a trotter and is pointed for the big stakes. 



Henry Carlton has leased the "Round Barn," 
known as the I. De Turk stable, in Santa Rosa, and 
there Lynwood W. will make the season of 1908. This 
stable, with the lots, paddocks, foaling stalls and 
other conveniences is an ideal breeding place. In 
the stall next to Lynwood W. will be the son, Sir 
Lynwood, that in later years is to take up the work 
of his sire. 



Parties at Petaluma have recently bought of W. C. 
Helman a two-year-old stallion by Wayland W., price 
reported to be $500. The colt is large, made on fine 
lines and should make a good stock horse. Wayland 
W. not only sires extreme speed, but handsome, ser- 
viceable horses. 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



William Cecil is at the Brace track, near Santa 
Clara, training a public stable. He has a fast green 
pacer by Nearest. 



At the auction sale of E. Stewart & Co., on Feb- 
ruary 28th, halter-broke, double-square chunks 
brought $85 to $125. 



T. W. Barstow of San Jose will have Nearest Mc- 
Kinney and Nearest 2:22% in the stud at his home 
place this season. He is working a few youngsters 
by Nearest, and among them is a green trotter that 
is said to be very fast. 



Budd Doble has Kinney Lou 2:07% and Diamond 
Mc nicely quartered at. Mr. Brace's Home Park 
Stables, at the head of Franklin street, in Santa 
Clara, Cal., where these two choice stallions will 
make the season of 1908. Several mares from Wash- 
ington and Oregon are being booked to Kinney Lou. 



W. R. Johnson is in charge of the Brace half-mile 
track, near Santa Clara, and will have the young 
stallion Sadi Moor there during the season of 1908. 
Johnson will train several good prospects there, and 
after the stud season will point Sadi Moor for a 
low record. 



The McKinney mare May N., dam of Direcho, sire 
of Danube 2:12,%, etc., is offered for sale by Mr. 
Geo. A. Pounder, of Los Angeles. May N. is along 
in years, but looks and acts like a colt and is ab- 
solutely sound. She has an Audubon Boy colt at 
her side now, but it is not for sale. 



The four-year-old Nutwood Wilkes mare owned 
by James Smith of San Francisco, is trotting like 
a winner at Pleasanton. Joe Cuicello has her in 
his string and worked her out last Wednesday, one 
heat being in 2:22%, with the last half in 1:08. 
Chas. De Ryder worked one of Dr. McLaughlin's 
gray trotters with Cuicello one heat, and the Mc- 
Kinney stallion Kinney Rose another. The little 
mare carried the gray to a break in the stretch, and 
as De Ryder dismounted from his sulky after the 
heat he remarked: "That little mare of Joe's is 
about the 'busiest' thing I've seen lately." She 
certainly looks and acts like one that can win races 
when she is seasoned. 



A very handsome and perfectly sound little brown 
mare, 14 hands high, that can be driven by a child, 
and that can pace a 2:20 gait any time, is offered for 
sale by an advertiser. This mare is such a nice 
driver that she would be just the thing for a lady 
to drive in the Park who enjoys letting her horse 
step fast at times. She will be sold very reasonable. 
Apply at this office. 



The pacing mare Salva, by Dictatus, owned 
by Mr. Ed. Wright of Hollister, is now in Charley 
Whitehead's hands, to be worked for this season's 

races. 



Without desparaging any of the sons of McKinney 
in the least, it can be stated that the stallion 
Washington McKinney. recently purchased by Mr. 
Frank J. Kilpatrick, and in Dick Abie's charge at 
Pleasanton, is the very handsomest son of the great- 
est sire of 2:10 trotters. His beautiful head, taper- 
ing to the muzzle and set with a pair of eyes that a 
painter would give half his life to be able to repro- 
duce on canvas, a neck that has a most beautiful 
crest and is perfectly arched, clean limbs and feet, 
a flowing tail that is carried high, yet almost touches 
the ground, he is a dress parade and show horse that 
could take prizes anywhere. His coat is a glossy 
black, which his star and white hind ankles only 
accentuate. He is undoubtedly one of the most 
beautiful stallions. 



The stallion Dictatus Medium 32499 is offered for 
sale by Mr. R. P. Lathrop of Hollister, whose busi- 
ness interests are such that he has no time to devote 
to this fine horse, and as the Hollister track has been 
sold and will be cut up into lots, he has decided to 
offer both his stallions Dictatus Medium and Mestoe 
for sale. Dictatus Medium is a grand individual, a 
beautiful bay with flowing mane and tail, stands 16 
hands and weighs over 1,200 pounds. His disposition 
is perfect and he is a sure foal getter. He Is a 
comparatively young horse, being but nine years 
old, and his colts that, are old enough to train show 
remarkable speed. Dictatus Medium is beyond all 
doubt, one of the best bred young stallions in America 
and with opportunity will sire great trotters and 
pacers. He is by Dictatus 2:17. that is by Red 
Wilkes, out of a Dictator mare, and Dictatus has 
sired two 2:10 performers. Dictatus Medium's dam 
is Belle Medium 2:20, the dam of Stam B. 2:11%, 
by Happy Medium. Happy Medium is regarded very 
highly, and appears in the pedigrees of such high 
class trotters as Nancy Hanks 2:04, Lou Dillon 
1:58% and others. The second dam of Dictatus 
Medium is Argenta by Almont Lightning, sire of the 
dam of Zombro, McKinney's greatest producing son. 
Dictatus Medium has been very popular with breeders 
in San Benito county for the past three years, and 
has many yearlings, two-year-olds and three-year-olds 
that are showing speed. His individuality alone will 
bring patronage to this horse in any community where 
high-class road and track horses are bred. Write to 
Mr. R. P. Lathrop, his owner, for a price on this 
horse. 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



CORRECTING FAULTS OF GAIT. 



[Marque in Horse Review.] 
For a long time I have had in mind a series of 
articles by prominent trainers on the practical 
part of the business; that is to say, shoeing, balanc- 
ing and rigging. The value of such articles com- 
ing at first hand from the men whose daily work it is 
to study and devise ways and methods of remedying 
faults of gait, is naturally great. However, there is 
one handicap to be met with, viz.: trainers, generally, 
while good conversationalists, either find it a difficult 
matter to put their knowledge on paper, or else claim 
this to be so. In order to facilitate matters, I there- 
fore asked the leading reinsmen to answer two speci- 
fic questions — these, in my opinion, covering the most 
important features of their profession. I am pleased 
to say that several interesting answers have been 
received for which the authors have my sincere 
thanks. Of these, several appear herewith. Others 
will appear from time to time and after the whole 
have been published, I will ask several critics that 
I have in mind to make an analysis of them, em- 
bodying the chief lessons which they teach. 
The two questions were as follows: 

1. What is the greatest improvement that you 
have ever known a trotter or pacer to make in a 
short time, as the result of change in shoeing or 
rigging? 

2. What do you consider the worst fault of gait 
in a trotter or pacer, and what remedy, in the way 
of shoeing or rigging, do you apply? 

Kindly give examples of cases drawn from your 
personal experience. 

Millard Sanders. 

Freedom of action has done more to perfect the 
gait of the trotter and pacer in late years than 
breeding. What first called our attention to this 
was the amateur matinee driver. He would buy a 
horse that had been raced two or three years to a 
high wheel, close-hitching sulky, driven by a pro- 
fessional, and given a record of 2:12. The first thing 
the amateur driver would do would be to hitch him 
to a low wagon with long shafts, which gave the 
horse every freedom of action, and the horse would 
trot a mile in 2:10 or 2:11. For a long time it was 
a great question in the mind of the average trainer 
why a horse could pull a wagon with four wheels 
faster with an amateur driver than he could pull 
a sulky with two wheels with a professional driver. 

Ordinarily a horse hitched to a sulky has the 
saddle girthed very tight and the shaft girths pulled 
together to make the sulky run steady; and, in the 
second place, the driver generally sits on the tail of 
the horse, which makes a horse feel cramped, and 
with every effort that he makes feels a resistance, 
all of which goes to retard his flight of speed. To 
prove this, a man cannot even sing well unless he 
has freedom of movement in order to throw every 
bit of expression and sentiment into the song that he 
is singing. Neither can a man play baseball with 
a stiff shirt and high collar on, because when he 
goes to run he does not want to feel as though he 
was hampered in any way. The latest sulkies built 
by our best sulky builders are constructed with ref- 
erence to freedom of action and freedom of the tail 
of the horse. The tail, I believe, to be the rudder, 
as every animal that runs, including the deer and 
the rabbit, use their tails while running. The cours- 
ing greyhound, I believe, is the speediest dog, and 
he invariably uses his tail. While running straight 
ahead after the hare he keeps his tail straight, but 
when the hare turns to the left the dog unconsciously 
switches his tail to the right before changing his 
course to meet that of the hare. The running horse 
uses his tail in getting away from the post, and if 
he gets tired he uses it at the finish. The old ex- 
pression, "he threw up his tail," may be instanced 
as an illustration to prove that the tail of the horse 
is necessary to him as the rudder is to the boat, and 
to have a horse properly balanced for a high rate 
of speed he must not be cramped in any way. 

The very smallest thing that causes friction will 
retard the speed of the trotter, consequently freedom 
of hitch is absolutely necessary. A horse properly 
balanced will not pull bard enough on the bit to ex- 
haust himself. Whilst I am an advocate of short toes 
and light shoes, T shall always remember what Mr. 
Robert Bonner told me twenty years ago, "that he be- 
lieved in a great many cases that a toe weight, if 
necessary, increased the endurance of a horse." As 
an example he gave Edwin Forrest a trial of 2:15 
without toe weights, and the horse was very much 
exhausted and distressed because he had to depend 
upon taking hold of the bit to steady and balance 
himself. Twenty minutes later he gave him another 
trial with four-ounce toe weights, and to his sur- 
prise the horse trotted an easy mile in 2:14% and 
was not distressed at all. From the fact that he 
was properly balanced and his gait was frictionless, 
he did not have to exhaust himself by taking hold of 
the bit. 

Balancing a horse is one of the most important 
features that a trainer has to contend with, as every- 
thing depends on perfection of gait with each indi- 
vidual horse. With some horses you can rig their 
mouths so that they will not require as much weight 
to balance them as they would if you did not have 



them properly bitted. What. I want to impress on 
the mind of the reader is this: If the feet are not 
properly balanced, a horse will take an unnatural 
hold of the bit, but the very minute you get your 
horse perfectly balanced he will take a nice loose, 
elastic hold. The man with the lines in his hands 
can feel the very instant that his horse is balanced. 
It is exactly like a fiddler with his bow; the instant 
he touches the strings he knows whether his fiddle 
is properly tuned or not. If it is not properly tuned 
up he cannot play without great effort. 

In the majority of cases a horse will require less 
weight with a low head than he will if he is checked 
up. We do not wear as much weight on trotters 
now as we did fifteen or twenty years ago, and I 
account for that partially because we do not check 
horses as high as we did in those days. The higher 
you check a horse the more weight you throw on 
his hind quarters, consequently you unbalance him 
in front and he will go short and stilty with his front 
feet. It is surprising to know of the number of 
horses that I have obtained the best results from 
by letting their heads down. 

You will often get a horse balanced by accident. 
As an example, I had a yearling pacer, and at that 
time we all thought pacers had to go with a close- 
fitting quarter-boot. One morning I accidentally 
broke one of this colt's close-fitting quarter-boots. I 
went to the stable and told the groom to put on an- 
other pair, and through some mistake, he put on a 
pair of bell boots with six ounces of lead in each 
one. Up to this time this colt had never been a 
quarter better than 39 seconds, but wearing the 
heavy quarter-boots he stepped one in 35 seconds. 
I then kept those boots for his individual use and 
he continued to improve, and in the fall I gave him 
the world's record for a yearling pacing stallion — ■ 
Rosedale 2:22. 

I believe that Jack Axworthy (3) 2:15% was one 
of the most difficult horses to balance and rig that 
I have trained. In the first place he scalped very 
hard, which made him very timid and caused him 
to trot with his right hind foot inside of his front 
feet. He also had a peculiar mouth, being inclined 
to pull on the right line. In addition he brushed his 
knees just enough to interfere with his speed. But 
his natural disposition was to be good-headed, and 
all his faults could be rectified by very careful shoe- 
ing and judicious rigging. 

To overcome the scalping I checked him up rather 
high, so as to throw as much weight on his hind 
quarters as possible, and I used a side-pole on the 
near side to keep him straight. For his knee-hitting 
I lowered the outside of both front feet and shod 
him with a long inside heel, with sharp calks on 
the hell of the shoe to prevent him from twisting 
his foot when it left the ground. I also cut the 
toe of the shoe square off about one-half inch back 
from point of toe for two purposes; one to make 
him break very quickly, and the other to compel 
him to break over square and straight. When he 
was rigged and shod just that way he could, in my 
opinion, beat any two-year-old that ever looked 
through a bridle. I worked him a mile in 2:14, 
last half in 1:04, and the last quarter in 31% seconds, 
and he never made a break with me after I got 
him properly rigged and balanced. 

The trotting mare Robizola 2:12% was a very 
difficult mare to train, as she had excessive action 
behind and scarcely any in front. I got her shod 
and rigged after a great many efforts. She also had 
a very bad mouth and pulled very hard. I put a 
straight bit in her mouth and used a lip strap and 
no check, which seemed to suit her exactly. I also 
shod her with an 8-ounce rolling-motion shoe in 
front, which quickened and elevated her gait at that 
end. To retard her gait behind I put on a five- 
ounce rim shoe, which seemed to hold her just 
enough to allow her front feet to get out of the way 
of her hind feet. 

The pacing stallion W. W. Foote 2:15% was a 
very peculiar horse to balance. I raced him through 
the California Circuit in the two-year-old stakes and 
won with him at San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Napa, 
Stockton, Sacramento and Los Angeles. San Jose 
was to be my last race and I was very anxious to 
win with him there, but the day before his race 
when I was going to blow him out, to my surprise he 
could not pace a mile in 2:30. I was naturally very 
much disappointed but not discouraged, as I knew 
the very minute that I got everything just right he 
would show his old-time form. I was carrying my 
own blacksmith with me and had depended on him 
to a certain extent to keep my stable shod properly, 
but by some oversight, through a mistake which 
should be more properly called carelessness, we had 
allowed the toe calks or grabs, on his hind shoes to 
become too much worn and he could not get any 
grab or hold, consequently could not pace a step. 
After trying him a great many times and by having 
his front shoes removed, I had the smith put sharp 
calks on the toes of his hind shoes, and he was an 
absolutely changed colt and the next day won his 
stake, pulled up in 2:15%. 

I bought Anzella 2:06% for Mr. Henry Pierce, of 
San Francisco, in 1902. Up to that time she had 
been wearing a McCormick check, which rested her 
neck, acting as a prop under her chin. When I ship- 
ped her east she was the hardest mare to drive I 
had ever handled, as you could not take her back 
and it was impossible to control her or keep her 
from rushing and making breaks. But instead of 
propping her head up, I tied it down with a halter 
and used scarcely any check, and the change was 



beneficial, as she beat most all of the good horses 
out that year, winning something like $21,000. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. B. Chandler. 

Your first question is a very broad one. 

I saw a pacer once when his trainer was giving 
him a trial and about 2:40 was where he wanted to 
pace. They took him to the barn and put the 
hobbles on him and came out and he worked a mile 
in 2:10. That was Tom Ogden 2:07. 

Trotters we often change by taking up their heads 
or letting them down, putting on weight or taking it 
off. Hut after a horse has been taught to trot say 
to beat 2:20, and thoroughly educated to stick to the 
trot, it does not make much difference how they are 
rigged, who drives them, who takes care of them, or 
who shoes them. They trot anyhow and continue to 
improve just as long as they keep sound. 

I knew a couple of men, in high-wheel days, who 
had a good trotter, but they could not get him bal- 
anced right. They kept changing his shoes every 
week, and he could trot in 2:25 every time they 
would try him. One Sunday morning I saw them 
have him at the shop changing his shoes. I knew 
he would get another trial and so I watched them. 
They put sixteen-ounce shoes on him in front and 
four-ounce toe weights. Those days we used the 
spur welded to the shoe a great deal, and that was 
what they used. The horse was gotten ready, the 
track being good and the day ideal. They gave him 
a couple of warming-up heats, and we all went out to 
see him step. He went away good and trotted a 
mile in 2:20%. That was awful those days. The 
driver got down and slapped his partner on the back 
and said, ""We have him now" When they started 
to walk away the driver turned around to the care- 
taker and said, "Hitch him up again in about 25 or 
30 minutes." The caretaker responded, "Are you 
going to work this horse another heat with that shoe 
off?" "Has he got a shoe off?" "Yes, sir; he threw 
one of his front shoes, weight and all, just as he 
went away; here it is, sir." Now this horse had 
been taught to trot, to trot shod anyway, with his 
head up or down, and when the day and track were 
perfect he could trot close to 2:20 with one shoe off. 
. I was convinced that day that a good horse, after 
he had been educated to trot, needed no particular 
driver, caretaker or blacksmith capable to make a 
good trotter out of a truly bad horse. There are 
some cases. I reckon, where shoeing and rigging 
have made trotters, but I think these horses would 
have been trotters with just good training without 
the rigging. 

Your second question, "What fault of gait I have 
had the most trouble with," I will answer by say- 
ing, in keeping the pupil straight. 

Without any apparent cause, horses will get to 
holding their noses to one side, and if that is not 
stopped instantly they will carry their hind parts 
to one side, and then my trouble begins. Unless I 
can get them straightened they will not improve for 
me. 

The most trouble, I think, that I ever had to keep 
any youngster straight was with Alix 2:03%. She 
was open-gaited behind, also going very wide in 
front — she hit her shins so hard that it was a diffi- 
cult matter to keep her straight. I went at her to 
close her up in front, and after I got her front feet 
so she would toe out a little and brush her knees, 
I had no more trouble with her. I have had less 
trouble with the Baronmores in this respect than 
any family I ever worked. The reason is, they are 
rapid, round-going colts, keeping their front ends 
out of the way all the time. As I said before, going 
sideways is the worst thing I have to contend with 
in gaiting trotters, and the way I try to overcome 
it is to quicken the front action so as to make the 
horse clear himself. 

Riverside Park Farm, Berlin, Wis. 

— • o ■ 

BERTHA THE GREATEST BROODMARE. 



The old mare Bertha by Alcantara, owned by Mr. 
C. L. Crellin, of Pleasanton, is the greatest of brood- 
mares in more ways than one. Besides being the 
dam of nine with records below 2:30, of which four 
are in the 2:10 list, she is the dam of more foals 
than any marc of her age. Bertha was foaled in 
1884, and is now 24 years old. She has produced 
nineteen living foals, and is now carrying a foal 
by Aerolite 2:11% that is expected in March. She 
is strong and robust, eats well and carries plenty of 
flesh. Her first foal, Diablo 2:09%, was dropped 
in 1889 when she was a five-year-old, and we believe 
she has never missed since. Bertha represents a 
remarkable case of fecundity, and has founded a 
family that already numbers fourteen 2:10 perform- 
ers. She has herself produced four, her son Diablo 
2:09% has sired seven, her son Demonio 2:11% has 
sired one, her son Don Derby 2:04% has sired one, 
and her grandson Infcrna 2:15% has sired one. And 
a peculiar thing is that while Bertha is trotting 
bred, every one of her fourteen descendants in the 
2:10 list is a pacer. 

o 

The firm of Singmaster Brothers have at their sale 
stables in San Jose sixteen head of German and 
French Coach, Percheron and Shire stallions from 
three to six years old. It is safe to say that no 
other Importing company have on sale a better lot 
of young stallions. Mr. C. O. Stanton, the manager, 
believes in making a low selling price at the sales 
barn, saving to the buyer all the cost of horses 
peddled around the country. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



f ROD, GUN AND KENNEL .*. 1 

! I 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT | 



PACIFIC COAST TRIALS. 



The Pacific Coast Field Trials Club's twenty-fifth 
annual trials, held near Bakersfield last week, on 
lands owned by the Kern County Land Company, will 
go down in the history of the club as being another 
one of many congenial meetings of sportsmen and a 
successful series of stakes run. The attendance was 
good for six days, weather conditions agreeable and 
the field work of the dogs of general good average. 

The Derby, while not having as many starters as 
in past years, turned out a very classy lot of young 
dogs. SL Ives, owned and bred by S. Christenson of 
San Francisco, is a compactly built and handsome 
Setter, full of stamina and go. He was placed first 
In the British Columbia trials September, 1907, and 
third in the Pacific Northwest trials following. 

Boy Blue, second, owned by J. G. Roberts of Ma- 
dera, is a typical English Setter, an intelligent, per- 
sistent worker with plenty of class. He was ■ bred 
by Hon. Chas. N. Post of Sacramento, and has the 
blood lines that appeal strongly to a student of 
breeding and devotee of field trials. 

Tiburon, equal third, is a litter sister of St. Ives, 
a handsome and sweet dispositioned bitch, classy and 
knowing worker, She is owned by E. Courtney Ford 
of San Francisco. She won the Pacific Coast Derby 
last year, ran first in the Pacific Northwest Derby 
last October and was equal third in British Columbia 
Derby, 1907. 

Peach Maid, a representative daughter of Ch. 
Peach Blossom, a pretty, light bitch, has quality 
that is backed up by gameness. 

Kil's Viola, winner of the All-Age, looks and per- 
forms in a way that strongly reminds one of her 
sire, Ch. Kilgarif. She is classy and fast and has 
bird sense to a degree. When she is on birds, she 
has a businesslike manner of going through her cover 
that is worth going some distance to see. 

Tod Sloan, second, is a sturdily built Pointer, 
clean cut and stylish. He carries a high head and 
is a consistent worker in cover. His speed and 
range are excellent. 

Belle Fontaine, equal third, won the Members' 
Stake at Bakersfield last year. She is a well put-up 
bitch, clean finished and strong. She is a merry 
goer and has much bird sense. 

Shasta Daisy, equal third, was second in the 
Coast Derby, 1907, and is a typical Ch. Kilgarif prod- 
uct. Last year she ran a game race, despite a 
recent recovery from distemper. In range, pace and 
working qualities she is high class. 

Margaret, winner of the Members' Stake, is a 
veteran field trial performer, bearing her years 
staunchly, a fast and very intelligent worker on 
birds. 

Ivywood, second, a younger dog, by Ch. Cuba of 
Kenwood, is full of stamina and a fast, rangy close 
worker. In conformation he is a Pointer of very 
good type. 

Sadie B., third, is a daughter of Sombra, a bitch 
of great reputation as a producer and a worker. Sadie 
has speed and style, coupled with much bird sense. 

Spot's Rip Rap, winner of the Championship Stake, 
need not take water from any dog. Barring being a 
bit unsteady, which fault will probably be absent 
when he is better acquainted with his handler, he is 
a cleanly built, well furnished dog, game and strong. 
He is fast and has working qualities that are of the 
best. 

The Derby. 

Monday, January 20. — Weather conditions were 
most favorable for the running of the Pacific Coast 
field trials. Thirteen starters, a classy lot of young 
dogs, were in the Derby Stake, the first series of 
which was finished late in the afternoon. Most of 
the dogs worked well, but a noticeable feature of the 
day's performance was a decided lacking of nose on 
the part of the young dogs. This was general and 
not individual. Repeatedly the dogs ran through 
or quartered cover in which were closely laying 
birds that were afterwards flushed by the sportsmen 
following on foot and in vehicles. That there were 
some reasons for this that would exculpate the dogs 
from faulty scent work was finally conceded by the 
experienced field trial men and handlers. Whether 
it was that the birds withheld scent or whether the 
alkali dust plentifully besprinkled on ground and 
vegetation were the handicaps for the dogs or just 
what the particular baffling conditions were has not 
yet been determined. In some places worked, the 
high, dry and closely tangled grass and tumble weeds, 
particularly when there was no wind, made scenting 
practically nil. This morning the ground was moist 
and in apparently ideal condition for bird work, not- 
withstanding trained dogs failed to locate many 
birds. 

The first brace in the Derby started at 9:40 A. M. 
Uncle Fontaine ran against St. Ives. This pair are 
litter brothers. The dogs were started from the 
northeast corner of section 16, about eight miles 
southeast of Bakersfield, a point from which the two 
previous trials were started. The judges instructed 
the handlers to follow a southwest course over open 
ground with low grassy cover. Both dogs ranged out 
far and made wide casts, quartering the open ground 



of low grassy cover. Both dogs ranged out far and 
made wide casts, quartering the open ground speed- 
ily. Birds were not located until a detour to the left 
was made, when the dogs worked through ground, 
near scattered willows, where a few birds were lay- 
ing closely. These birds took wing when the train 
of vehicles and pedestrians went through the cover. 
Both dogs paid scant but excusable attention to jack 
rabbits, but were under control of the handlers. A 
small bevy was soon located in an adjoining field 
to the north. St. Ives soon made two points on 
single birds and was steady and under control when 
the birds were flushed and when Handler Coutts shot 
blank cartridges, St. Ives was best in range and 
speed. The dogs were taken up after running forty 
minutes. 

Boy Blue and Peach Maid were the second brace 
cast off. The dogs started at 10:35 and ran fifty 
minutes, working first over a portion of the same 
ground the previous pair went through. Peach Maid 
was soon away to the east in the trees and lost 
fifteen minutes. Boy was under the best control. 
Coutts claimed a point for Boy, but the dog failed 
to locate. Three birds were afterwards flushed from 
near-by grass cover, evidently had run from the 
dog. Birds were fairly plentiful, those following the 
judges and handlers flushed a number. Boy came to 
a staunch point on several birds in the close brush, 
he was steady to shot and wing. Later he flushed 
a single bird and others were raised from high dry 
weed cover he went over. Peach Maid located birds 
in near-by open ground and was steady when the 
birds took wing and the gnn was fired: This was 
Boy Blue's heat. 

The third brace were cast off at 10:40, and ran 
forty minutes. Singol with Thier's Dot. The dogs 
were sent away in the same section on a westerly 
course over open ground. Both showed range, style 
and good speed and were under excellent control, 
making wide casts and quartering closely. Swinging 
the course around to a-swale with willow thickets 
close by, Thiers worked the brush, but failed to lo- 
cate birds that were afterwards put up by the teams 
and those on foot. Both dogs showed the effects of 
the increasing heat and were given water by the 
handlers. Singol showed the greater stamina 
throughout the heat. Dot at times evinced a strong 
inclination to come in to his handler. Singol snapped 
into a staunch point and was nicely backed by Dot 
at command of the handler. The point was a pretty 
one, but failed to materialize feathers. Later Dot 
swung into a point near a clump of brush, from 
which a bird flushed. This was unseen by the judges, 
who were on ahead following the course. By this 
time there was a gradual and noticeable shedding of 
superfluous clothing by many of the sportsmen. The 
fat men of the party were freely larding the ground 
by reason of old Sol's now perceptible warmth. 

After the dogs were taken up the party drove 
several miles to the Gosford Ranch House, where a 
substantial luncheon was enjoyed. 

At 2:30, after a drive of three miles to section 20, 
east of the ranch house, the fourth brace, Santa 
Rosa with Policy Boy, was cast off. Both dogs went 
away on a northwest course, over rolling, grass 
covered country. Each had a slight penchant for 
rabbit chasing, but were under excellent control. 
Santa Rosa soon located a small bevy in scattered 
cottonwood trees, near a dry ditch. Policy Boy 
meanwhile was away and off the course. Santa Rosa 
showed a desire to find birds and worked her ground 
closely and intelligently. 

She soon snapped into another point, but was a 
little unsteady to the report of the gun. but dropped 
at command. The Pointer, when taken to different 
ground, showed an inclination to get back to where 
she knew the birds were. This heat was much in 
favor of Santa Rosa, who kept up a merry clip all 
through the heat. The dogs were ordered up at 
3 P. M. 

Madera Dick and Kil's Linda were next cast off 
at 3:05, and ran forty-five minutes. The dogs first 
worked through open country on an easterly course 
in section 20 and then drew up to scattered trees 
along the dry bed of a wide irrigation ditch. Dick 
soon found birds, pointed prettily and remained 
steady to gunfire and flight. Linda ranged away 
from the course. Lucas lost ten minutes in getting 
her back to work. Dick, now on open ground, drew 
and roaded for forty yards into loose brush, but 
nothing developed save a rabbit. Working through 
the low cottonwoods numerous single birds were 
flushed from where they were lying closely in the 
grass cover, over which the dogs had quartered. 
Some of these birds took wing from under the teams, 
so close did they lay. This heat was lacking in 
many opportunities for bird work, scent conditions, 
however, seemed to be decidedly against the dogs. 

At 4:05 Sallal and Kil's Jessie were cast off in 
section 21, east of where the previous brace ran. 
Open ground was first selected, both dogs giving 
good evidence of desirable speed, style and range 
qualities, the Pointer showing up best. Birds were 
soon located among scattered cottonwoods. Sallal 
proved to be a good ranger and worker, but like the 
previous running dogs failed to locate until going 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 



over plenty of ground. In the trees he made one 
pretty point and was staunch to shot and wing. Jessie 
was not under good control and had a fancy to in- 
vestigate fur. Quite a few birds were afterwards 
raised from cover the two had worked. 

Tiburon, the bye dog, closed up the first series of 
the Derby with Sadie B. as a brace mate. The two 
were put down at 4:55 in the same section and on 
a south and west course along the banks of a dry, 
wide irrigation ditch, the ground being partly open, 
with grass and weed cover and studded with 
scattered cottonwoods and willows. 

Tiburon pointed several singles out in open 
ground during the heat and was staunch. Her speed, 
range and bird sense were sufficiently shown to put 
her in the second series. 

The judges announced in the evening the follow- 
ing dogs carried into the second series: Peach 
Maid with St. Ives, Tiburon with Santa Rosa. Re- 
serve brace, Boy Blue with Sallal. 



Tuesday, January 21. — The performances of the 
dogs to-day were more satisfactory in many respects 
than the varied exhibitions of the previous day. 
Weather conditions were practically the same as en- 
sued on Monday. One thing noticeable was that 
birds were not run over so often as during the first 
day's running. 

St. Ives and Peach Maid were put down at 9:25 
in the northwest corner of section 17 and ran a 
forty-minute heat. Away on open ground. Ives 
showed better range and speed than Maid. In 
among scattered trees Ives pointed a single, steady 
to flush and shot. Soon a large bevy was located, 
most of the birds taking to the trees. Peach Maid 
pointed in low grass. Ives made a covey point and 
two singles. Maid scored three singles in the heat. 
During the last ten minutes the dogs worked in high, 
matted tumbleweeds. 

Tiburon and Santa Rosa started at 10:20, working 
easterly on open ground, practically the same terri- 
tory as the previous brace worked, where birds had 
been marked down. 

In the open ground both dogs ranged fast and 
wide, quartering back to brush cover. Tib pointed 
a jack, but was under full control. Over the fence 
on the Fraser field to the west the dogs drew blank 
in open field. Drawing up to trees birds were found. 
Here Tib pointed a single following with a small 
bevy find, which he left as the crowd rushed up. 
Working now on scattered birds he snapped into a 
single and was properly backed by Santa Rosa. Rosa 
now pointed near the same spot, but did not hold on — 
Tiburon followed with two singles. 

The reserve brace, Boy Blue and Sallal, were cast 
off at 11:35 in the Fraser field over open grassy 
ground, then swung back into section 17, working 
over the territory the previous brace had prospected. 
Blue soon found a covey in the dry weeds and sup- 
pleriiented with a single Sallal missed a chance on 
a covey. The heat was Boy Blue's, decidedly. 

After luncheon, the judges called for St. Ives and 
Boy Blue, intending to run them an hour heat, this 
to determine first and second place. The ground 
selected was section 23, west of the Canfield School- 
house. 

At 2:15 the brace went away over open ground 
covered with low, dry weeds. St. Ives here showed 
the superior pace and range. Working around east- 
erly to the boundary fence birds were found, a num- 
ber of which sought the trees before the dogs got 
within working distance. Enough scattered birds 
were left, however, to enable a rather interesting 
finish to the heat. St. Ives wound up with a credit 
of two bevies and a single, he was steady to shot and 
wing. Boy had one bevy and a single point. Both 
dogs, however, made several flushes. There was no 
backing during this heat, both dogs were working 
practically independently. Boy was steady and under 
control at all times. After running thirty minutes, 
the brace was ordered up. Boy had a shade the best 
of it in this heat, but the general average of St. 
Ives during the stake had to be acknowledged. 

The judges, after consultation, announced the 
winners: St. Ives first. Boy Blue second, Tiburon 
and Peach Maid equal third. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 20, 1908.— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-fifth annual Derby. Open to 
Setters and Pointers whelped on or after January 

1, 1906; $10 to nominate. $5 second forfeit, $5 to 
start; cups to winners and purse divided 50, 30 and 
20 per cent; 20 nominations, 13 starters (11 Setters, 
2 Pointers). Judges, H. L. Betten, Alameda; H. M. 
Keller, Santa Monica; D. G. Macdonnell, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

t 

E. Courtney Ford's, San Francisco, lemon and 
white English Setter dog Uncle Fontaine (Uncle 
Jimmy Whitestone-Belle Fontaine), whelped March 

2, 1906. S. Christenson, breeder; F. Coutts, handler; 

with 

S. Christenson's, San Francisco, white black and 
tan English Setter dog St. Ives (Uncle Jimmie 
Whitestone-Belle Fontaine), whelped March 2, 1906. 
S. Christenson, breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

J. G. Roberts,' Madera, black, white and tan Eng- 
lish Setter dog Boy Blue (Rival-Lightheart), whelped 
January 10, 1906. Hon. Chas. N. Post, Sacramento, 
breeder; F. Coutts, handler; 

with 

J. E. Lucas,' agent, Rosedale, Kern county, Cal., 
black, white, ticked and tan English Setter bitch 



n 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



Peach Maid (Sports Count Danstone-Ch. Peach Blos- 
som), whelped . J. E. Lucas, handler. 

Sunlit Kennels' (Post and Taylor), Sacramento, 
white, black and tan English Setter dog Singol (Don 
Jose-Gleam Girl), whelped July 22, 1906. Hon. Chas. 
N. Post, Sacramento, breeder; J. E. Lucas, handler; 
with 

J. W. Considine's, Seattle, black, white and tan 
English Setter bitch Thier's Dot (Thier's Dan-Mel- 
rose Toodles), whelped June 21, 1906. J. W. Consi- 
dine, breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

J. W. Considine's, Seattle, white, black and tan 
English Setter dog Policy Boy ( Avalon-Policy Girl), 
whelped March 17, 1906. California Kennels, Red- 
wood, Cal., breeder; J. E. Lucas, handler; 

with 

W. H. Easterbrook's, Boston, liver and white 
Pointer bitch Santa Rosa (Recruit-Fandango), 
whelped February 14, 1906. W. B. Coutts, handler. 

J. G. Roberts, Madera, black and tan Engilsh Set- 
ter dog Madera Dick (Uncle Jimmie Whitestone-Belle 
Fontaine), whelped March 2, 1906. S. Christenson, 
breeder; F. Coutts, handler; 

with 

Jos. E. Terry's, Sacramento, black, tan and white 
English Setter bitch Kil's Linda (Ch. Kilgarif-Iona 
S.), whelped April 5, 1906. Jos. E. Terry, Breeder; 
W. B. Coutts, handler. 

H. H. Abbott's, Vancouver, B. C, white and black 

Pointer bitch Sallal ( ) W. B. 

Coutts, handler; 

with 

J. W. Considine's, Seattle, white and black English 
Setter bitch Kil's Jessie (Ch. Kilgarif-Melrose Nora), 
whelped January, 1907. J. W. Considine, breeder; J. 
E. Lucas, handler. 

E. Courtney Ford's, San Francisco,' white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch Tiburon (Uncle Jimmie 
Whitestone-Belle Fontaine), whelped March 2, 1906. 
S. Christenson, breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler; a bye. 
II. 

St. Ives with Peach Maid. 
Tiburon with Santa Rosa. 
Boy Blue with Sallal. 

III. 

St. Ives with Boy Blue. 

Result. 

St. Ives first, Boy Blue second, Tiburon and Peach 
Maid equal third. 

The All-Age. 

The first brace down in this stake were two 
Pointers, Joe and Point. The heat was started on 
section 20 and finished in section 21 at 4:26, the 
route now being towards town. The heat did 
not develop much on the lines desired. Sent 
away first on open ground, Jock showed best pace 
and range, Point being very methodical and com- 
panionable. At that up north he is looked upon as 
without a peer on Mongolian pheasants,. Birds were 
found first in the heavy cover among the trees and 
then near the boundary ience, where a bevy flushed; 
both dogs missed chances, Joe favors fur at odd 
times. 

Tod Sloan and Kil's Viola were put down at 4:30, 
sent off on a south-east course from where the prior 
brace were taken up. Tod set off at a merry, swing- 
ing clip, ranging wide and quartering as if he meant 
business Viola was also an excellent goer, odds here 
were about even. Swinging around to the trees 
and back to where birds were located in the previ- 
ous heat, the best work yet shown soon materialized. 
Viola pointed and was backed by Tod, the latter 
could not refrain from a rabbit sprint now and then. 
Viola snapped into a pretty point and was staunch 
and steady. Tod found a single in brush cover, also 
steady and under control. Lots of birds were in the 
heavy cover. Viola noaded, but the birds outfooted 
her, she dropped to command when her handler found 
out what was going on. Viola pointed a single, Tod 
finally back on course, but was not steady, breaking 
in on point. Viola made five singles, Tod being 
credited with one point. The Setter's work through- 
out was snappy and evinced much bird sense; toward 
the close of the heat she performed in green grass 
close of the heat she performed in green grass 
covered ground interspersed with bare trees, sparse 
cover that under the circumstances was difficult to 
work. Ordered up at 5:05. 

During the two days' running there was very 
little wind, a circumstance that, no doubt, affected 
results to quite an extent. 



Wednesday, January 22. — A heavy fog blanketed 
the valley this morning, which delayed the start 
from the north-west corner of section 17 until almost 
10 o'clock. A* cold wind from the south-east pre- 
vailed 

Sport's Bad Boy and Baywood were cast off at 
9:55, course east over open ground with low, dry 
cover. Three fields were traversed and drew blank. 
Baywood had the superior speed and range, both 
dogs worked their ground well. Working south 
into scattered trees and dry tumble weeds. Boy 
pointed a single, was unsteady and flushed. Finding 
another single he broke shot. Birds were flushing 
numerously now, more by reason of the following 
crowd than anything else. The heat was rather 
tame. Up at 10:45. 

McCloud Boy and Ramona, the next brace, were 
cast off at 10:50, practically over the course followed 



in the previous hoat. Moth cut out a wide, speedy 
pace, neither dog located birds, a half dozen quail 
were flushed from weeds, near a ditch, through which 
the dogs had gone. Ordered up at 11:32. 

The third brace, cast off at 11:40, Belle Fontaine 
and Ventura. Away on a south-west course in section 
17, both showed style, speed and excellent range. 
Belle excelling here. They went away in wide casts 
over open ground, through two fields, but drew 
blank until taken into ground near sparse trees. 
Birds were flushed from dry weeds the dogs had 
gone through. Why this should be so in this case 
was a puzzler, the dogs were experienced field trial 
dogs in familiar ground, which by the way was ex- 
ceedingly dry, the sun too was getting very warm. 
Belle pointed a bird in the dry weeds and quickly 
dropped to an excusable flush. Birds were soon 
found scattered and laying close. Belle drew into a 
snappy point and was steady and under control when 
handler Coutts shot and the quail took flight. Ven- 
tura meanwhile had run off the course and was 
away about ten minutes. Both dogs worked together 
on course again, but nothing further that was ex- 
pected or desirable transpired. A large bevy was 
flushed from the cover the dogs went through. The 
duration of the heat was fifty minutes. 

After luncheon new ground was prospected, section 
20 being selected. Colton and Veronica were cast 
off at 1:35 and ran forty-five minutes. Both dogs 
ran off course for several minutes. Opportunities 
for bird work were plentiful, _but neither dog made 
good. Veronica pointed, Colton backed and broke 
in on a false point. A bevy and singles were 
flushed from cover both ran through. 

Spot's Rip Rap and Abbott's Jock were cast off 
at 2:25 in the north-east corner of section 20, going 
away over open, burnt ground. Both were speedy 
wide rangers, stylish and covered ground intelligent- 
ly. Jock was the speedier dog. Spot's work in this 
heat gave no indication of the work he was capable 
of and which he demonstrated in the final of the 
Champion stake. He was slower and hard to keep 
on the course. Finally birds were located in grassy, 
open ground but neither dog scored. The heat was 
indifferent. Up at 3:05. 

The next brace, the eighth, Shasta Daisy and 
Keepsake were sent away at 3:20 on new ground in 
section 21. Birds were soon located, but the two 
dogs failed to produce the goods looked for. A large 
bevy took flight from dry weeds the dogs had gone 
through when the teams and pedestrians followed 
after. Near the south end of the section the only 
interesting feature of the heat occurred. The dogs 
routed out an enormous-sized coyote that failed to 
notice the approaching cavalcade, so intent was the 
animal in stalking a bunch of quail, from which 
he intended to get his supper. The reception and 
yells with which the coyote's advent was received 
sent the marauder away on a sprint that probably 
ended in the next county. Although a large bevy of 
birds was now flushed from the heavy grass, neither 
dog did better than show up on false points. Up 
at 4:23. 

Avalon, the bye dog, finished the first series, cast 
off at 4:23, sunset concluded the heat. Senator ran 
as a brace mate. Avalon started, nearer town, from 
the southeast side of section 16, and was soon lost 
to view in the trees. Senator did some excellent 
work in close view of the spectators. Avalon found 
birds, but not in view of the judges. 

In the evening the judges announced the following 
dogs in the second . series: Kil's Viola with Ra- 
mona, McCloud Boy with Sport's Bad Boy, Tod Sloan 
with Shasta Daisy, Belle Fontaine with Keepsake. 



Thursday, January 23. — Heavy fog and a slight 
sprinkling of rain early this morning threatened to 
put a quietus on the running of the second series 
and finals in the All-Age stake to-day. The tempor- 
arily dampened ardor of the sportsmen did not pre- 
vent a fairly early start for the selected ground, 
section 16, about seven miles southwest of Bakers- 
field. Shortly after reaching their destination the 
weather conditions, although rather moist and chilly, 
were favorable enough to continue operations. 

Kil's Viola and Ramona were cast off on open 
ground in section 16 and thence into section 17. 
Viola had the speed and range over her rival. She 
located a bevy and followed with two singles. She 
worked merrily and stylishly all the time. She 
made one single flush, but was obedient to command. 
Ramona pointed a single, but did not hold. The 
ground worked was very favorable. Up at 10:30. 

McCloud Boy and Sport's Bad Boy, cast off at 
10:40, west of where prior brace stopped, worked 
ground already gone over. Both dogs missed many 
chances. Birds were flushed repeatedly from cover 
the dogs had worked. The cover generally was ex- 
ceedingly dense and hard for the dogs to get through. 
Up at 11:20. 

Tod Sloan and Shasta Daisy were cast off in the 
west half of section 17 at 11:43. Both went away 
over open ground until taken on a southerly course 
Where birds were known to be in the tumble weeds. 
Tod pointed, but broke to shot. Tod pointed again 
and was steady — Daisy pointed and Tod backed. This 
was on running birds, probably, for the handler was 
not able to flush. Going on, Tod pointed as birds 
flushed, pointing another single; Daisy backed. Daisy 
then pointed, backed by Tod at command. This last 
was on running birds, there being no chance to road 
in that cover. Daisy made the final point, staunch 
and steady. The tieat was hers decidedly. Up at 
12:15. 



After luncheon the party drove to -the Canfleld 
School-house, secton 23 being selected for the next 
brace, Belle Fontaine and Keepsake. They were cast 
off at 1:50. Going north at a merry pace over the 
open ground, the course swung around to the right. 
Birds were found in weeds near the east fence, after 
crossing a water ditch. Both dogs quartered their 
grounds in workmanlike style. A small covey was 
located, Belle pointed staunchly, steady to flush and 
shot. Keepsake made two false points; once she 
was prettily backed by Belle. Keepsake afterwards 
came to a neat point, which she held and was steady 
to shot and wing. Up at 2:45. 

Kil's Viola and Tod Sloan were now called for, the 
intention being to run a two and a quarter-hour heat, 
under the rules. As they have come together pre- 
viously this heat, it was decided, would only de- 
velop a mere matter of conventionality. After being 
down five minutes they were ordered up. 

The judges shortly announced the winners: Kil's 
Viola first, Tod Sloan second, Belle Fontaine and 
Shasta Daisy equal third. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 21, 1908.— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-fifth annual All-Age Stake, open 
to all Setters and Pointers; $10 to nominate, $10 
to start ; cups to winners, purse divided 50, 30 and 
20 per cent; 17 nominations, 17 starters (10 English 
Setters, 7 Pointers). Judges, H. L. Betten, T. J. A. 
Tiedemann, J. M. Kilgarif, San Francisco. 

i. 

Dr. H. Hendrickson's. Hanford, white and black 
Pointer dog Joe (Dr. Daniels-Fan Go). Fred Coutts, 
handler; 

with 

D. G. Macdonnell's, Vancouver, B. C, white and 
black Pointer dog Point (Sport-Periot's Daisy); 
owner, handler. 

D. G. Macdonnell's white and liver Pointer dog 
Tod Sloan (Bolin's Duke-Whisper) ; owner, handler; 
with 

J. W. Considine's, Seattle, black, white, ticked and 
tan English Setter bitch Kil's Viola (Ch. Kllgarlf- 
Roxane). J. E. Lucas, handler. 

D. G. Macdonnell's white and black English Setter 
dog Sport's Bad Boy (Marie's Sport-Jackson's Dot) ; 
owner, handler; 

with 

Lloyd Tevis,' Stockdale, liver and white Pointer 
dog Baywood (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella). M. 
A. Dodge, handler. 

.1. W. Considine's white, black, ticked and tan Eng- 
lish Setter dog McCloud Boy (Tony Boy-Sadie Hop- 
kins). J. E. Lucas, handler; 

with 

Jos. E. Terry's, Sacramento, white and ticked Eng- 
lish Setter bitch Ramona (Ch. Kilgarif-Belle of the 
Ball). W. B. Coutts, handler. 

E. Courtney Ford's, San Francisco, white, black 
and ticked English Setter bitch Belle Fontaine 
(Count Whitestone-Gracie Gladstone). W. B. Coutts, 
handler; 

with 

W. G. Kerckhoff's, Los Angeles, white and lemon 
English Setter bitch Ventura (Harry H.-Peachmark 
II.) J. E. Lucas, handler. 

S. H. Smith's, Colton, liver and white Pointer dog 
Colton (Dr. Daniels-Lottie Rlpstone). Chas. Bab- 
cock, handler; 

with 

W. H. Keller's, Santa Monica, white, ticked, black 
and tan English Setter bitch Veronica (Count's Mark- 
Amanda). J. E. Lucas, handler. 

H. H. Abbott's, Vancouver, B. C, white and liver 
Pointer dog Abbott's Jock (Imp. Wasco-Alberta 
Queen). W. B. Coutts, handler; 

with 

Dr. Dennison's, Chicago, white and black Pointer 
dog Spot's Rip Raj) (Four Spot-Queen of I^etitz). D. 
G. Macdonnell, handler. 

Jos. E. Terry's, Sacramento, black, ticked, white 
and tan English Setter bitch Shasta Daisy (Ch. Kil- 
garif-Ione S.). W. B. Coutts, Handler; 

w i t h 

W. W. Van Arsdale's, San Francisco, white, blacb 
and ticked English Setter bitch Keepsake (Califor- 
nia Bell Boy-Peach Blossom I. ('has. Babcock, 
handler. 

Geo. B. M. Gray's, Oakland, Cal., white, black and 
ticked English Setter dog Avalon (California Bell 
Boy-Peach Blossom). Chas. Babcock, handler; a bye. 

I. 

Kil's Viola with Ramona. 
McCloud Boy with Sport's Bad Boy. 
Tod Sloan with Shasta Daisy. 
Belle Fontaine with Keepsake. 

III. 

Tod Sloan with Kil's Viola. 

Result. 

Kil's Viola first, Tod Sloan second, Belle Fontaine 
and Shasta Daisy equal third. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 



The Members' Stake. 

The first heat in the Members' Stake was between 
Sadie B. and Lemonade. The dogs were cast off at 
4 o'clock in a vineyard opposite the Canfield School- 
house. Sadie was handled by her owner. Lemonade 
was in charge of E. Courtney Ford, in the absence 
of her owner. In this stake retrieving is a feature 
of the work required. A large bevy of quail was 
soon located. The dogs showed good range and 
plenty of speed. Each dog scored a number of 
points. Lemonade proved to be steadiest on point 
and under gun fire. Sadie B. was the best retriever. 
Both dogs are high class for work to the gun on 
upland birds. 



Friday, January 24. — A bright, sunny morning with 
the atmosphere crisp and clear, after the rain of the 
preceding night, was assuring to the sportsmen of a 
most favorable day for continuing the trials. A 
Favorable breeze also prevailed during most of the 
heats, which was another acceptable factor in bring- 
ing about good results. 

The first brace down, Oakwood and Margaret, cast 
off at 10:10, in the southwest corner of section 21, 
developed some work that appealed to the sporting 
blood of those fortunate to be onlookers. The dogs 
broke away on most desirable open ground with 
plenty of weed and tree cover close by. Margie 
had decidedly the best foot and widest range. As a 
close and intelligent worker she fills the bill amaz- 
ingly well for so old a bitch. Working south a 
large bevy was discovered in high weeds, but flushed 
on the approach of dogs a"nd men. The birds had 
been marked down, but were too wild for effective 
work. A bevy of over 200 birds were seen in the 
adjoining field, the dogs were working up to them 
through a corn stubblefield. Shots were fired to 
scatter the birds. Then ensued a series of field pic- 
tures for the next twenty minutes in and about the 
corn stubblefield, such as seldom falls to the lucky 
view of the sportsman. Margie made point after 
point on close laying birds, was steady to flush and 
shot and a fine retriever, save when Oakwood ran 
in. Oak was not steady and broke in to shot several 
times. Up at 10:53. 

The last brace in, Senator and Ivywood were cast 
off nearby on similar ground at 11 A. M. Ivy was 
sent on through weeds, -across a ditch to open, burnt- 
over ground, where he quickly found a fair sized 
bevy. He was staunch and steady to shot and wing 
and retrieved properly. Senator failed to back. A 
field to the north drew blank, as did the corn stubble. 
Across into an alfalfa field Ivy pointed again, and 
also missed several chances. Senator snapped into 
a nice point, was steady and tried to retrieve his 
bird frdm the top of a tree, where it lodged. Or- 
dered up at 11:50. 

After a few minutes consultation the judges an- 
nounced the winners: Margaret first, Ivywood sec- 
ond, Sadie B. third. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 23, 1908— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-fifth annual Members' Stake; 
cups to winners, $10 to start; 6 nominations, 6 
starters (4 Pointers, 2 English Setters); handled by 
owners. Judges, H. L. Betten and T. J. A. Tiede- 
mann. 

I. 

Jos. E. Terry's, Sacramento, white and lemon Eng- 
lish Setter dog Lemonade (Ch. Kilgarif-Belle Fon- 
taine). E. Courtney Ford, handler; 

with 

H. W. Keller's, Santa Monica, black, white, ticked 
and tan English Setter bitch Sadie B. (Sir Roder- 
ick-Sombra). 

Gordon Tevis,' Stockdale, white and liver Pointer 
dog Oakwood (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella) ; 
with 

Lloyd Tevis' white and black eared Pointer bitch 
Margaret (Cuba's Zep-Jingo's Bagpipe). 

J. W. Flynn's, San Francisco, white and lemon 
Pointer dog Senator (Ch. Senator P.-Dolly Jingo) ; 
with 

Lloyd Tevis,' Stockdale, white and liver Pointer 
dog Ivywood (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella). 

Result. 

Margaret first, Ivywood second, Sadie B. third. 

The Champion Stake. 

The draw for the championship stake took place 
on the field — three braces and a bye, run as given 
below. The general average of work in this stake 
was most excellent, individual performances being 
brilliant at times. The surprise of the running was 
the splendid showing of Spot's Rip Rap, who de- 
veloped something hardly suggested by his prior heats 
in the All-Age. Taken all together, the dogs in this 
stake were considered by more than one authority 
present able to hold their own in any trials, certainly 
it was the best champion stake the club has had for 
years. With many present, it was believed that 
Belle Fontaine should have got first place, but, how- 
ever, the judges were always up and saw what was 
going on and the decision was not criticized. In the 
last heat the dogs were handled by their owners, two 
gentlemen amateurs. Both handled their charges in 
orthodox style, although Spot's director might have 
refrained from a rather continuous use of the 
whistle, which several times rattled Belle, still this 



was rightly attributed to eager enthusiasm and 
keen interest in getting his Pointer to take advan- 
tage of every chance, wihch assuredly did, proving 
himself a grand performer, and that without lowering 
Belle's colors to any noticeable degree. 

Spot's Rip Rap and Avalon were cast off at 1:20 for 
a two-hour heat. Section 17 was selected for the 
opening heat, the brace broke away at a merry pace 
ranging in wide casts over open grassy ground. After 
running over a mile they drew up to trees along the 
edges of a wide swale. Spot snapped into a 
staunch point and then roaded in, probably on run- 
ning birds, for there was no find. The Setter had a 
shade the best in range and pace. Spot now buckled 
down to work and put up a series of workmanlike 
performances that was not suspected in him from 
his previous showing. Birds were soon located 
among the trees. Spot snapped to a point in cover, 
where birds had flushed from, Avalon backed at com- 
mand. Following on through heavy matted weeds, 
the sun's heat getting stronger all the time, Spot 
false pointed again, shortly after he came to a 
staunch point on a bevy. The false points, it was 
conceded were on running birds, roading was impos- 
sible in the heavy cover. Avalon pointed two sin- 
gles off to the right, and was steady to shot and 
wing. Spot scored another single, but was a bit un- 
steady. He then made a big covey find and held on 
staunchly for several minutes until his handler came 
up. It was believed at first he was lost, but he was 
attending strictly to business. He followed with 
some excellent roading and then worked back to 
where he knew birds had been laying. Pointing a 
single, he was a trifle unsteady. He then found a 
small bevy and scored another single, which Avalon 
backed. The latter pointed several close laying sin- 
gles. Both were in good fettle when ordered up. 

Belle Fontaine and Ramona were cast off in seer 
tion 16 at 3:30. They broke away stylishly and 
fast over open ground in wide casts. Coming up 
to trees and tall, dry weeds Belle worked out for 
a bevy find. Going over to section 21 she made two 
bevy points and three singles. Ramona scored one 
single and was well worked out when ordered up. 
Belle was in good fettle. 



Saturday, January 25. — Another clear morning 
with the ground well conditioned after the rains 
of the preceding night. 

Abbott's Jock and McCloud Boy were put down 
at 10:48 in section 17 going over familiar ground 
they were fast and rangey. Birds were soon located, 
but a bit wild, quickly flushing to the trees. Jock 
scored two singles and was steady to shot and 
wing. He followed with several false points in cover 
from which birds had recently flushed. McCloud 
scored a single, steady to wing and gun. He then 
found a bevy, steady as before. Birds were fairly 
numerous now in excellent working cover. Jock 
pointed, steady to flush and shot. McCloud ran over 
birds, then pointed twice, but was a bit unsteady. 
He then made a bevy find across a ditch in heavy 
dry weeds. Jock worked stylishly and with a high 
head. Next dropping to flush, McCloud pointed 
Jock backed, both steady and under control. Both 
scored singles which were not seen by the judges. 
Jock now tried to break in on several false points. 
The Pointer was in grand shape when ordered up. 
McCloud showed the pace he had gone through. 

Tod Sloan was put down for the bye at 2:25 first 
on open ground in section 20. Uncle Fontaine was 
his riming mate. After ranging in wide casts for ten 
minutes, Tod scored a point and was steady to 
shot and flush. He then pointed a single in thick 
brush and was steady, twenty yards farther on he 
made a covey find, pointed a single but broke in, 
another point was steady and staunch. Tod was 
fast, high-headed and fairly staunch. Uncle's 
chances were limited, what he did was el-editable. 

Belle Fontaine-Spot's Rip Rap. — The judges now 
called for this brace to run the final, which deter- 
mined first place. They were sent away at 
4:45 and ran till 5:10. Section 16 was selected 
for the starting point. Both broke away fast and 
ranged far out over the open ground. Drawing 
around to the left and up to a swale fringed with cot- 
tonwoods and willows, Belle made a wide cast to 
the right, soon locating running birds among the 
trees. Here she roaded, without fault, for over a 
hundred yards, scoring a point in the thick brush, 
steady to shot and flush, under good control. Spot 
was busy off to the left in the brush cover, where he 
found a bevy and scored several singles. Sent on, 
both dogs were soon on birds and worked beauti- 
ftflly in a give-and-take race. At one time each 
scored a point from opposite sides of the same brush 
cover. Belle was under the best control. A few 
minutes before they were ordered up Spot scored an- 
other bevy point and several singles, which Belle 
backed prettily. After nearly a half-hour's run they 
were ordered up. 

When the judges compared notes, the decision was 
in favor of Spot's Rip Rap for first place. 

Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 24, 1908. — Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-fifth annual Champion Stake, 
open to all placed winners at recognized trials in 
the United States or Canada. W. S. Tevis Challenge 
cup to winner, cup to runner up; $20 to start, one 
money. Judges, H. L. Betten, T. J. A. Tiedemann. 



I. 

Dr. Dennison's, Chicago, white and black Pointer 
dog Spot's Rip Rap (Four Spot-Queen of Letitz). D. 
G. Macdonriell, handler; 

with 

Geo. B. M. Gray's, Oakland, white, black and 
ticked English Setter dog Avalon (California Bell 
Boy-Peach Blossom). Chas. Babcock, handler. 

E. Courtney Ford's, San Francisco, white, black, 
and ticked English Setter bitch Belle Fontaine 
(Count Whitestone-Gracie Gladstone). Owner hand- 
ler; 

with 

Jos. E. Terry's. Sacramento, white and ticked Eng- 
lish Setter bitch Ramona (Ch. Kilgarif-Belle of the 
Ball). W. B. Coutts, handler. 

J. W. Considine's, Seattle, white, black, ticked and 
tan English Setter dog McCloud Boy (Tony Boy- 
Sadie Hopkins). J. E. Lucas, handler; 

with 

H. H. Abbott's, Vancouver, B. C, white and liver 
Pointer dog Abbott's Jock (Imp. Wasco-Alberta 
Queen). W. B. Coutts, handler. 

D. G. Macdonnell's white and liver Pointer dog Tod 
Sloan (Bolin's Duke-Whisper). Owner handler; a 

bye. 

II. 

Belle Fontaine with Spot's Rip Rap. 

Result. 
Spot's Rip Rap first. 

o 

NOTES. ' 



At the annual meeting of the club, held Tuesday 
evening, the officers elected for the ensuing year 
were: Elmer H. Cox of Madera, president; Jos. E. 
Terry of Sacramento, first vice-president; Hon. Chas. 
N. Post of Sacramento, second vice-president; E. 
Courtney Ford of San Francisco, secretary-treasurer. 
Executive Committee — V. A. Caglieri of San Fran- 
cisco. John Schumacher of Los Angeles, J. W. Con- 
sidine of Seattle, D. G. Macdonnell of Vancouver, 
B. C, H. L. Betten of Alameda and T. J. A. Tiede- 
mann of San Francisco. 



The club trials for 1908 will take place the last 
full week of January. 



Derby entries will close August 1st; $10 first for- 
feit, $10 to start. 



All-Age entries will close December 1st; $10 first 
forfeit. $10 to start. 



The Members' and Champion Stakes will close the 
night before they are started. Members' Stake, $10 
to start; Champion Stake, $20 to start. 



The proposed riding on horseback by handlers at 
the next Coast trials was referred to the Executive 
Committee for action. 



The following named sportsmen were elected to 
membership of the club: D. G. Macdonnell, W. H. 
Easterbrook. Gordon Tevis. Lansing Tevis, Jos. East- 
land and Col. E. A. Forbes. 



In the next trials of the club retrieving will be a 
feature of the Members' Stake only. 



The prizes in the events run off last week were 
cups donated by the following named sportsmen: 

Derby Stake — Joseph E. Terry of Sacramento; H. 
M. Keller of Santa Monica. A third cup for the 
Derby will be announced later. 

Members' Stake — Elmer H. Cox of Madera, the 
President's cup; E. Courtney Ford, the Secretary's 
cup; J. W. Considine of Seattle. 

All-Age Stake — J. W. Flynn of San Francisco, W. 
H. Easterbrook of Boston, Sievers Floral Company 
of San Francisco. 

Champion Stake — W. S. Tevis, Perpetual Champion 
cup; J. G. Roberts of Madera, cup for runner-up. 

All events, except the Members' Stake, are open 
to all Setters or Pointers complying with the rules. 
o 

The Southwestern Kennel Club's annual meeting 
was held January 25th. The following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: Paul Piepers. presi- 
dent, in place of Arthur Letts resigned; W. K. Peas- 
ley, first vice-president: B. MacDonald. second vice- 
president and William Kennedy, secretary. 



Judges for the Pasadena show are announced as 
follows: James Ewins (English and French Bull 
Dogs); G. Fred Herr (all Toy and miscellaneous 
classes); Arthur G. Bennett (Mastiffs, Great Danes, 
Newfoundlands, St. Bernards, Collies, old English 
Sheep Dogs, and all sporting breeds) ; G. S. Halli- 
well (all Terriers and unclassified specials.) 



The Utah Kennel Club of Salt Lake has been 
incorporated with a capital of $2,000. April 4 to 7 
are the dates for the spring show. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



1 THE FARM 1 

DAIRY FARMING. 



The following address on "Dairy 
Farming," was delivered by ex-Gov- 
ernor W. D. Hoard of Wisconsin, be- 
fore the Iowa Dairymen's convention, 
held recently at Des Moines: 

I have been a close student of 
dairying, particularly from the farm 
end, for nearly fifty years. In all this 
time I have been greatly impressed 
with the fact of the ignorance of men 
who keep cows, concerning what I 
may call the foundation principles of 
dairy practice. My greatest hindrance 
has been my own ignorance. In my 
lecture work in most every state in 
the Union and in Canada; in my study 
and work as editor of a dairy paper; 
and on my dairy farm with a herd of 
forty registered cows, everywhere, has 
this question of the necessity of more 
and beter light, better understanding 
of plain, simple dairy truth been con- 
stantly before my eyes. Everywhere 
do I see farmers struggling to win 
success with cows, and everywhere 
do I see only a very meagre reward. 
All the time I have been convinced 
that there is from 100 to 600 per cent 
more net profit for any farmer to re- 
ceive if he will but cast aside his 
prejudice and look at the question in 
its right light. 

The more I investigate this question 
of net profit, the more astounded do I 
become at the tremendous difference 
that exists between the men who think 
and those who will not think. Here is 
an illustration: There are two patrons 
of the Hoard's creameries living a half 
mile apart. One has thirty cows and. 
the other nineteen. To the man with 
the thirty cows the creamery paid the 
sum of $35 per cow for the milk of 
one year. To the man with the nine- 
teen cows was paid $60 per cow. It 
cost each of these men $30 apiece to 
keep their cows for the year. One 
man got $30 above the cost of keep- 
ing; the other man got $5. Thirty 
dollars is 600 per cent more than five 
dollars. Think of what an interest 
that is. What was the matter with 
the five-dollar man? A lack of dairy 
understanding. What did it do? It 
caused: First, poor cows; second, 
poor stabling; third, poor feeding. 
The best cow in the world could not 
do good work unless well cared for 
and rigtly fed. 

I used to spend hours with that five 
dollar man to get him to see the 
truth about himself, his ideas and his 
methods. He would not read or in- 
form himself. He was trying to do 
his work with too little exercise of 
brains. There were three factors or 
•auses for that man's loss of good 
reward; poor thinking is first. Now 
that caused poor cows, caused him 
to provide poor stabling and poor 
feeding. Did you ever think of what 
would happen if a man went on to the 
race track with a 2.000-pound draft 
horse to compete with a standardbred 
trotter? Would such a man get any 
sympathy from the crowd if he lost 
his money, which he would be sure 
to do? All over Iowa, as well as other 
states, do we see farmers working 
hard to win on this dairy race track, 
with just about such an equipment of 
ideas, cattle and fitness of things. 

In my cow census work, from the 
Atlantic States to the Misissippi 
river, I am overwhelmed with the 
poverty of ideas, cattle and care that 
farmers invest in this business; and 
I am amazed that they do not see 
where the trouble lies. Let me ex- 
plain what a cow census is. I send 
an expert into a creamery neighbor- 
hood to investigate the year's busi- 
ness of 100 farmers who have been 
patrons of a creamery for a full year. 
I want to dig down to the very bottom 
of each farmer's business. The 
expert is to find how many cows he 
milked for the year; of what breed 
they are; how they are fed, stabled 
and cared for; and finally what was 
the cost of keeping those cows for a 
year, counting pasturage at $5. After 
all this knowledge has been obtained, 
at the farm end, he goes to the cream- 
ery and finds out how much milk was 
received and how much cash the pa- 
tron got for the year. Then he figures 



up from that how much the patron's 
cows earned at the creamery for every 
dollar spent in feed. Lastly, he in- 
quires into how the farmer fed his 
own mind; whether he was a reader 
of dairy papers. This was to find 
whether he took any pains to be a 
well informed dairy farmer and note 
what effect that had on his fortune. 
Then the expert writes ten letters 
to Hoard's Dairyman describing the 
work of ten patrons in each letter. 
These patrons are described by num- 
ber from 1 to 100 and not by name. 

Now, you see that from 100 aver- 
age patrons I can obtain a very fair 
idea of what the great body of dairy 
farmers in a state are doing. In 
Iowa two of these cow censuses have 
been taken of 100 herds each. The 
first was taken in 1900, the last in 
1906. Each fanner may learn his 
number if he desires it, but not his 
neighbor's number. Heretofore all 
that has been done to get at the real 
truth of what the farmers were get- 
ting from their cows at the creamery 
has been the poorest kind of guess 
work. Creameries are not organized 
to help the farmer look into the con- 
duct of his end of the business, and 
besides most of the time he does not 
care to know. But every creamery 
ought to be a dairy center from which 
should radiate all the knowledge and 
information it is capable of giving 
back to the patrons. 

Think of what a flood of light would 
be poured out of the creameries of 
Iowa upon its patrons if a thorough 
cow census was taken each year by 
each creamery and the farmer had a 
chance to see squarely and truthfully 
(1) what their own cows were earning 
for every dollar spent in feed; (2) 
what their neighbors' cows were earn- 
ing. Don't you think it would stir 
thousands of farmers to change their 
ideas, their cows and their methods? 

It would be a great thing for the 
creameries too, but they do not see it. 
They will twist and wring to get an 
additional patron, but they will not do 
a thing in a practical way to greatly 
increase the amount of milk that will 
come from their present patronage. 
That Is something so close to their 
feet that they do not want to see it. 
Meanwhile the patrons are getting 
only about a tenth they might get at 
the same ependiture for feed and the 
creamery is complaining of small 
profits. 

Let me read you some of the de- 
ductions from the last Iowa cow 
census. 

Territory: Three counties in north- 
east Iowa, including patrons of eight 
creameries, average price of butter fat 
22.7 cents per pound. Of those 100 
herds 83 numbering 890 cows are of 
the dual purpose type, 633 of them 
are earning a profit above their feed. 
Twenty-five of these herds, numbering 
257 cows, over 33 per cent are not 
paying for their feed. Seventeen 
herds numbering 172 cows are of the 
dairy type; of these 16 herds num- 
bering 163 cows are earning a profit 
above the cost of their feed. But one 
herd, consisting of 9 cows, of this 
group, failed to pay a profit. 

The average cost of keeping the 
dairy breed cows was $28.33 per cow. 
The cost of keeping the dual purpose 
cows was $27.23. The production of 
the dairy-bred cows over the dual pur- 
pose was 68.1 pounds of butter fat, or 
$13.91. But four herds fed ensilage. 
They made $18.37 per herd more net 
profit. The 172 dairy-bred cows, nine 
of which did not pay for their feed, 
produced $19.59 more net profit than 
the 890 dual purpose cows. That is a 
fact worth considering, when just the 
difference In breeding will make 172 
cows earn $19.56 more net profit than 
890 dual purpose cows. 

Now we come to the effect or reading 
dairy papers in its influence on a 
dairy farmer's profit. Fifty of these 
farmers read such papers. How did 
it, affect their profits? They returned 
24 cents more for each $1 spent in 
feed and their reading reduced the 
food cost of the- butter fat over 2% 
cents a pound. The average cost of 
keeping both dairy bred and dual 
purpose was $28.23. I told you that 
the mere act of reading on dairy 
subjects added 24 cents more for each 
$1 spent in feed. Multiply $28.23 by 
24 and you have $6.77. Did it pay 
these men to spend a dollar on the en- 
lightenment of their minds? Does it 
pay to buy $6.77 for one dollar? Yet 



nearly one-half of these 100 farmers 
do not believe it pays to buy $6.77 
for one dollar. Of the forty-six far- 
mers who did not read dairy literature, 
nineteen did not get enough from their 
cows to pay for the keeping. Of the 
fifty-four who did read only six did 
not receive enough from their cows 
to pay for their keeping. 

Now here is the actual condition of 
things in one of the most prosperous 
dairy sections of Iowa. Does it afford 

(liny food for thought and action? It 
should. Never again ought we to hear 
an Iowa patron of a creamery say: 
"It don't pay to breed in dairy blood." 
or "It don't pay to read a good dairy 
>aper." 

o 

THE GOAT DAIRY. 



Goat, dairying has been ushered in- 
to existence in California as a com- 
mercial enterprise under auspices 
that promise well for the industry. So 
far as the average citizen realizes, 
the only figure that the goat cuts in 
our industrial economy is the occa- 
sional "nanny" securely tethered by 
a rope in some vacant lot in the out- 
skirts of our cities, the security af- 
forded by the rope being protection 
from her taste for bill posters, the 
contents of back yard wash lines and 
the pasturage that often grows on the 
roofs of the humble homes in those 
parts of our cities where the milch 
goat is tolerated. 

The goat is said to be the "poor 
man's cow." Well, our California 
goat dairy in its inception is on alto- 
gether another basis. Instead of be- 
ing confined to the outskirts of the 
city among the poor whose invaluable 
family friend the goat has proven td 
be, she is to make her debut as a 
commercial proposition in Pasadena. 
America's exclusive millionaire city. 
If reports are correct, the invasion of 
goat's milk may prove the undoing 
of the cow in that aristocratic burg, 
which has always insisted upon iti 
authorities turning the cow inside out 
and examining every bone and sinew 
in her make-up to be sure that she is 
hygenic and a safe source of milk 
for retired pork-packers, brewers and 
other blue-bloods. An enterprising 
firm of young men, Winthrop Howland 
and H. C. Hurd, of that city, have had 
an eye open to the bad reputation 
the dairy cow has acquired among 
the Pasadenans, and they lost no 
time in getting in on the ground floor 
with a soiuce of milk not open to 
the criticism that has been laid to 
♦ he cows of that section. From the 
success of the undertaking so far, 
and the eagerness with which the 
present output has been snatched up 
" at good prices, it would seem that 
Pasadena had accepted the goat as 
a milk proposition at par value. 

It is stated that the firm of How- 
land & Hurd have on hand a fair-sized 
goat herd, but they claim more in 
the way of dairy quality than for num- 
bers. Included in their herd are a 
number of imported Swiss Totten- 
burgs, a breed famous for milking 
capacity. They are reputed to yield 
from three to six quarts a day, and 
keep up a good flow for eight or nine 
months a year and with less feed than 
a cow requires to produce the same 
amount. The present herd of How- 
land & Hurd is kept in Pasadena, 
but when their herd reaches the de- 
sired number it is their plan to se- 
cure land in the near-by mountains, 
so as to give the animals as near as 
possible their natural environment. 
It is also their plan to expand the 
business, and from the inquiries the 
firm is receiving for stock, it is ex- 
pected that the demand for the in- 
crease will be a source of profit. In- 
quiries have already been received 
for goats from Mexico and Japan. 
With such economic producers as 
goats, a demand for their milk by 
those who are able to pay good prices 
for it, and the fact that physicians 
recommend it in preference to cow's 
milk on account of its composition 
and easy digestibility, these enter- 
prising young men of Pasadena ought 
to succeed— unless they are up against 
a mere rich folk fad. — Pacific Hairy 
Review. 

o 

THE VALUE Or BREEDING. 



At a meeting of the Mississippi 
Farmers' Institute, W. G. Harding, 
general live stock agent of the M. & 



O. Railway, made an address on the 
subject of grading up cattle, in the 
course of which he said: 

"Having been raised in the vicinity 
of the blue grass farms and stock 
raising establishments which were all 
handling the pure breeds of stock, it 
did not occur to me that any one 
would handle scrub stock unless they 
were so unfortunately fixed as to pre- 
vent them handling any other kind. 

"I do not remember when the first 
question was put to me in regard to 
pure bred cattle, but I always as- 
serted that good cattle were the best 
to raise before I could find data to 
convince people that I was right. 

"Only one experiment has been 
conducted to my knowledge for the 
distinct purpose of ascertaining the 
difference in value between the blood- 
ed animal and the scrub, and' done 
with car lots of cattle. The experi- 
ment to which I refer was conducted 
in the State of Illinois for the ex- 
press purpose of determining how 
much difference there existed from a 
feed lot standpoint between com- 
mon cattle on the one hand and choice 
to fancy beef cattle on the other. 

"What were considered choice and 
fancy cattle were such as can be pro- 
duced by two or three crosses of 
Shorthorn, Hereford or Angus blood 
on the common cattle of the country. 
And what were classed as common 
were scrub things without any grad- 
ing or character and did not show 
any sign of good breeding. In the 
summary of this test the experiment- 
ers said more rapid and much larger 
gains may be secured on the better 
than the more common grades. We 
find on a fair basis of calculation that 
the choice to fancy steers made a gain 
of 9.74 pounds, whereas the common 
cattle made a gain of 7.61 pounds for 
every bushel of grain consumed. 

"This shows that the choice cattle 
produced 2.13 vounds more beef per 
bushel of corn consumed than did the 
common cattle. 

"When sold, the choice cattle 
brought $5.40 per hundred pounds and 
the common cattle, being fat and no 
longer common, sold for $4.80 per hun- 
dred pounds. The 2:13 pounds of 
choice beef which the common cattle 
did not produce was worth 11 % cents 
in all, and this was the value of 
good blood over the scrub on every 
bushel of corn fed. 

"The choice cattle realized 46 V£ 
cents per bushel for the corn fed, 
while the scrub cattle realized only 
35 cents per bushel. One of the re- 
cent sales of cattle at St. Louis was 
a load of Mississippi beef cattle, 
which averaged 1517 pounds and sold 
at 5 cents, or $75.85 per head. They 
were Mississippi bred, Mississippi 
raised and Mississippi fed — they were 
high grade Shorthorn cattle, raised and 
fed by Colonel F. M. Abbott, Abbott. 
Miss. This shows the value of good 
breeding on the one hand, and that 
what can be done in Illinois or Iowa 
can as well be done in any Southern 
State. There is one step further in 
the life of the cattle in which the 
value of blood is apparent. In the 
Stacker and feeder trade the cattle 
graded by any of the improved beef 
breeds are worth from three-fourths 
of a cent to two cents per vound in 
market over and above the cost of the 
common cattle, according to grade, 
quality and> condition of offerings and 
the condition of the market." 

In conclusion the speaker said: 

"It Is plain to me thai under no 
reasonable circumstances does blood- 
ed stock fail to pay. 

"The planter-stockman who has 
cows and wishes to sell his calf crop 
annually gets more for half-breed 
calves by four or five dollars per head 
than his neighbor who has a grade 
bull. 

"So it runs through every branch 
of the cattle business. Men may rea- 
sonably differ as to which breed is 
best, for their purpose or locality, but 
no difference can longer exist as to 
the expedience and necessity for rais- 
ing high-bred cattle through the 
length and breadth of the South, 
Where, in my opinion, the highest de- 
velopment of blooded slock can be at- 
tained." — Texas Stockman. 

o 

Palatable rations suitable to growth 
as well as to fattening are of more Im- 
portance than the chemical composi- 
tion of the ration. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 



HOW TO SELL BREEDING HOGS 
BY MAIL. 



The following paper was read by 
Geo. P. Lillard. at the Texas Swine 
Breeders' meeting: 

Each section of this subject will 
naturally divide itself into several 
heads. In buying a hog by mail, first 
decide what breed you want and con- 
template the purchase of nothing 
short of the very best individuality 
and breeding of the breed you have 
selected. Have for your motto. "The 
best are none too good," and stick 
to it. There is a great deal in a right 
start on any proposition, and this 
adage is doubly true in the hog rais- 
ing business. 

Now don't expect to secure this 
class of hogs at a cheap price, for 
there is no truer philosophy than the 
fact that you cannot get something 
for nothing. Don't expect to buy a 
first-class pig of up to date breed- 
ing for $10. Let me say right here 
that I believe the failure of many 
in the hog business is due to the fact 
that the price influenced them in the 
purchase of inferior animals. That 
the highest priced animals are the 
cheapest in the end, if they possess 
corresponding quality, is a fact that 
cannot be disputed. 

Now that we have decided what 
to buy, and that only the best, the 
next question that arises is where 
can we find the desired class of 
stock? While you might occasionally 
secure a first-class animal from a 
trader or speculator — I do not call 
them all breeders — my advice is to 
trust your money and selection of 
individual to some reliable breeder 
who advertises in the leading live- 
stock journals, and better a breeder 
who has exhibited and won at the 
state fairs, for we all know that in 
this day of strong competition the 
man who wins the ribbons must have 
the goods. Don't be deluded with 
the impression that to secure first- 
class hogs you must send your money 
a long way from home, for it has 
been clearly demonstrated that Texas 
has as good hogs of all the leading 
breeds as can be found in the United 
States. 

The record of awards at our state 
fairs for years will attest to the fact 
that Texas bred and raised hogs 
have more than held their own 
against the best specimens from some 
of the leading herds of the north. 
And further, at the San Antonio In- 
ternational Fair in 1904, Texas raised 
hogs won every first prize in compe- 
tition with winners direct from the 
St. Louis World's fair. In years past 
it was neeesary for us to send north 
for first-class stock, and thanks to 
our brother northern breeder for 
often furnishing us the right kind 
of stock. But as before stated, Texas 
now has as good swine, both in breed- 
ing and individuality, as can be found 
in the world, and we are glad to 
note the fact that Texas hogs are 
now being shipped north. You will 
pardon me for being personal in men- 



tioning the sale of a herd boar at the 
recent San Antonio International fair 
to an Illinois breeder and judge of 
national reputation. This boar was 
shipped to his new northern home 
and placed in the stud at the record 
price of $100 a service. 

We will now discuss the selling 
side of our subject. I am often 
asked the question, "How is it that 
you are able to dispose of your large 
annual crop of Berkshires with so 
little difficulty?" The story is told 
in a few words. Keep the very best 
breeding stock, and with proper mat- 
ing and judicious feeding and hand- 
ling you have first class stock to 
offer, for which there is always de- 
mand at fair prices. Have enthusi- 
asm for your business and the breed 
you represent. Let the public know 
the class of stock you are breeding 
by making a creditable exhibit at 
your county and state fairs, and ad- 
vertise judiciously in reliable and 
influential farm and stock papers. 
If you want to be neglected and for- 
gotten, isolate yourself by not adver- 
tising. Be prompt and courteous in 
your correspondence, using as few 
words as possible. Keep an exact 
copy of what you have written. Of- 
ten we get an order days after an- 
swering leters of inquiry and by 
referring to copy book see exactly 
what was offered. 

In describing stock do not exag- 
gerate their quality and value, and 
if you haven't what the prospective 
buyer wants say so. Offer nothing 
but first-class stock of up to date 
breeding and in good thrifty grow- 
ing condition. Let the butchers and 
packers have the culls. Treat your 
customers fairly, always striving to 
give them value for their money, 
and if nature has endowed you with 
average intelligence and plenty of 
energy your efforts will be crowned 
with success. — Texas Stockman. 

o 

It requires twelve to sixteen weeks 
to get lambs that have never had grain 
in good condition for market. Under 
ood management lambs will gain 
one-quarter to one-half pound per day, 
or twenty-five to thirty pounds during 
the feeding period. It requires eight 
to nine pounds of dry feed to produce 
one pound of grain. 



PILES CUBED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS. 

PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to 
cure any case of Itching, Blind. Bleed- 
ing or Protruding Piles in 6 to 14 
days or money refunded. 50 cts. 



peter saxe & SON, 513 Thirty-sec- 
ond street, Oakland, Cal., Importers, 
Breeders and Dealers for past thirty 
years. All varieties Cattle, Horses, 
Sheep, Hogs. High-class breeding stock. 
' 'orrespondence solicited. 



FOR SALE. 



Four Jacks from one to six years old, 
and three large Jennys. Inquire 
HENRY KLEMP, 
Care of Spring Valley Ranch. 

Rocklin, Cal. - 



Sou of Mi Kinnky 2A\}4. 
World s Cri-atcst Sin- of Speed 



Bonny McKinney 41383 

bred. Four black colt* 6j him on exhibition. Bonn; McKinney is a trotter BWir 

Fee: S40 for the Season. 

Bonnie Searchlight 34899 

Ronnl^W^hn'J^ %^ J £Lj^if?S'i Q** ** £trl >»' G«Hlan;8ra dam Clara by Klmo BU.ete. 

lion n H Searchlight, el ly resembles his sire, and s a magnificent brown colt -i ve.irs i,M . (■« 

natural MM and « ill be trained to race this year, llonnie S.-archligCis a trotter. ' 

Fee: $40 for the Season. j*m«r y i*. to j u i y m. 

Excellent care taken of mares. Fee returned if 

H. BUSING, Race Track, Alameda, Cal. 



January lit. to July lit 

Son Of SKAItCIII.IGHT l.m^i. 

King of Race Horses. 



Will be pleased to show these horses at any ti 
mare fails to get with foal. Apply to or address 




TALLION OWNER 

If In need of anything In the line of Stallion Cards compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks, 
Stallion Service liooks, Horse Cuts in stock and made from photos 
Hoof Pads of all kinds for road or track, lSrcedlm; Hobbles, stallion 
Supports. Preisnators and all Specialties for Stallions. 

Write for samples and prices. : : : : i 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 




From 

RAY WARNER 
A Noted Michigan Owner and Trainer, 
Known Throughout the Country. 



Coldwater. Mich., Jan. 4, 1908. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Gentlemen: I believe "SAVE-THK- 
HOK.SE" is the best remedy made fur 
bone spavin. In the spring of 1903 I 
started to train a mare with a well de- 
veloped bone spavin. She was so lame 
that we turned her out and gave her re- 
peated blistering for a year. The fol- 
lowing spring she was still lame. Un- 
decided to try "SAVK-THK-HORSK" 
and went right on with her work. Be- 
fore we started her, about the first of 
July her lameness entirely disappeared. 
She has raced very successfully for the 
last three years and has a record of 
2:1114 over a half-mile track. 

Yours truly, 

RAY WARNER. 

"SAVE ' THE - HORSE" permanently 
cures Bone and Bog Spavin, Ringbone 
(except low Ringbone), Curb, Thorough- 
pin. Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind Puff, In- 
jured Tendons and all lameness, without 
scar or loss of hair. Horse may work 
as usual. 

$5.00 Per Bottle, with a written guar- 
antee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make it. Send for 
a copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

Troy Chemical Co. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Formerly Troy. N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
•S Baya Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



DICTATUS MEDIUM FOR SALE. 



The highly bred producing stallion 
Dictatus Medium 32499 is offered for 
sale. He is a grand individual, very 
popular with breeders and his colts all 
show speed. He was sired by Dictatus 
2:17 (son of Red Wilkes and Miss I,ollie 
by Dictator), sire of Funston 2:08'/i. 
Dietatress 2:1)83,. etc.. dam Belle Medium 
2:20 (dam of Stam B. 2:11 %). by Happy- 
Medium, sire of Nancy Hanks 2:04, etc., 
second dam Argenta by Almont Light- 
ning, sire dam of Zombro 2:11. Is 16 
hands and weighs 1,200 pounds; nine 
years old. Sure foal getter. For price 
and full pedigree, address R. P. 
LATHROF. Hollister, Cal. 

MARE FOR SALE. 

Brown mare, five years old, absolutely 
sound, afraid of nothing, and can be 
driven by a child. This mare is but 14 
hands high, but is elegantly formed and 
handsome in harness. She Is a pacer, 
and can show better than a 2:20 gait 
at any time. Will be sold very rea- 
sonable. Apply to BREEDER and 
SPORTSMAN, Room 366, Pacific Build- 
ing, corner Fourth and Market Streets. 



m At the Ct 
||r Tongues Endl| 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

CQMPRE55ED PURE-SALT BRICK5. 
AND PATENT FEEDERS. 

No wdste.no neglect, all convenience 
Your dealer hds it Write us for the book. 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn, n.y. 



„o CO PA/54 



w m 



CAPSULES 



O 

z 

c/1 




TOM DILLON 

— Agent for — 

John B. Stetson's Hats 



Orders filled by mail. 



Van Ness Ave. & McAllister St., 
San Francisco. 



WM. T. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

TETBRINAEY SURGEON 
1155 Golden Gate Ave. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— in — ^ 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco 

RUBBEROID ROOFING 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BONESTELL, RICSARDSON ft CO., 
473-485 Sixth St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

COLLIE AND BLOODHOUND PUP- 
PIES FOR SALE. 



Best bred Young Stock on the Coast. 
Sires and Dams winners on the Bench 
and Workers in the Field. Address 
T. S. GRIFFITH, 
Glen Tana Collie Kennels, 
Spokane, Wash. 

FOR SALE— SETTER PUPS. 



Pedigreed English Setter Pups, two 
months old. Address 

M. PERRY. 

454 West Santa Clara St., San Jose. 




^flSORBINE 



Cures Strained Puffy Ankles. 

Lymphangitis, Bruises and 
Swelling!). Lameness and 
Allays Pain Quickly -without 
Blistering, removing the hair, or 
taring the horse up. Pleasant to uRe. 
»:'.iin per bottle, delivered with full 
directions. Hook 5-C, free. 

ABSORBING, JR.. for man- 
kind, f\.m Bottle. Cures Strains, 
Gout, Varicose Veins, Varicocele, 
Hydrocele, Prostatitis, kills pain. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

54 Monmouth St. Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Hraun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 




For Guns 



"3 in One" Oil Has No Equal 

for oiling trigger, lock, every action part. Does 
not dry out quickly like heavier oils, gum, harden 
or collect dust no matter how long gun stands. 
"3 in One** cleans out the residue of burnt powder 
(black or smokeless) after shooting, leaving the 
barrel cleanand shiny. It actually penetrates 
the pores of the metal, forming a delicate pei 
manent protecting coat that is absolutely 
impervious to water or weather* No acid. 
I . , A test will tell. Write for sample 
rree bottle. G. W. COLE COMPANY, 

102 New Street, New York, N. Y. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



May N. by McKinney. the dam of the 
great stallion IMrecho. She is old, but 
looks and acts like a colt, and is abso- 
lutely sound. She is, no doubt, one of 
the best broodmares in California; also 
has an Audubon Bov colt at side. (Colt 
nut tor sii!.-. > G. A. POUNDER, Agri- 
cultural Park, University Station, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 



Saturday, February 1, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest and Surest 

^ Veterinary Remedy 

HAS IMITATORS BUT NO COMPETITORS I 



SAFE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE, 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SICIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SWEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL, 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We guarantee that one tahlespoonful of Caustio 
Balsam will produce more actual results than a whole 
bottle of any liniment or ipu in mixture evrr made 
Every bottle sold ia warranted to give satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the most proml 
nent horsemen say of it. I*rice, $1.50 per bottle. 
Sold by druggists, or sent by express, charges paid, 
with full directions for its use. 

The Accepted Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliable. 

Sure In Results- 




SoUJhmertess £- Proprietors /brine \ 
*OTS.& CANADAS. 



CLEVELAND, 



NOTHING T?rT GOOD flFsn.TS 

Haveused COM BAUI.T S CAUSTIC BAI.^VH for mors 
Ithan 20 years. It i« the best blister I have e- or trie! I hive 
lose.1 it in hundreds of cases with best results. It is I or- 
Ifeclly safe for the most ines perienred pe, Km to use. This 
III the largest breed, ng establishment o! trutlins 1 orses in 
I the world, and nse yonr lilister often. -<V. II. UA1 M.\IP, 
|Prop. Stimuli! l'ark Stock Knrm, Belmont Park, Mont 



rsED lO YFATJ«! SFrTKSSrFT.T.Y. 

I have used GOMRAFLT'S CAUSTIC BALSAM for ten I 

! years ; have been very successful in curing curb .ringbone, 
ca|i|.ed hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism, end al- 
most every cause of lameness in horsei Have a stable of | 
forty head, mostly track and speedway horses, and cer- 
tainly can recommend it.— C. C. (RAH Kit, Training! 
Stables. 990 Jennings Street, New York City. 



Sole Agents for the United States and Canada. 

The Lawrence- Williams Co, 

TORONTO, ONT. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



THE EAST IS THE 



BIG COLT MARKET 

BUYERS DEMAND THAT COLTS HAVE 

EASTERN FUTURITY ENGAGEMENTS 



ENTER YOUR MARE IN THE 



American Horse Breeder Futurity 

FIFTH RENEWAL 

-PURSE - $10,000 



For Mares Bred in 1907, Foals of 1908 



l^COSTS ONLY 



$1 



TO ENTER A MARE 



For particulars address AMERICAN HORSE BREEDER, 162 High Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



GEORGE E. ERLIN, Prop. 



JAMES M. McGRATH, Mgr. 



Dexter Prince Stables 

TRAINING, BOARDING and SALE 

Cor. Grove and Baker Sts., Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park. 
(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars.) 
Best located and healthiest stable In San Francisco. Always a good roadster 
on hand for sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and erercise park 
roadsters and prepare horses for track use. Ladies can go and return to itable 
and not have their horses frightened by autos or cars 



Wanted- 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS WANTED IN 
EVERY TOWN ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE 
"BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN." 



John Barduhn, formerly of the Thurlow 
Block 

John Kavanagh, formerly of the Palace 
Hotel 

Kavanagh & Barduhn 

Merchant Tailors 

1124 Golden Gate Avenue, 
Between Buchanan and Webster Sts., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Fairmont Hotel 

Management of 

Palace Hotel Co. 

A Guarantee of Excellence 



The only large hotel commanding 
a view of our incomparable bay. 
The best located hotel in the 
world, as it is the most convenient 
to the business centers, while its 
elevation affords wholesome ad- 
vantages in the way of pure air, 
sunshine and the absence of all 
annoyances connected with the 
rebuilding of a great city. 

EUROPEAN PLAN ■:■ 

Rates, single: $2.50, $3, $4, $5, 

$6, $7, $8. 
Suites: $10, $12, $14, $16, $18, $20 
.EVERY ROOM WITH BATH. 

Music a feature at Dinner and 
in the Foyer, evenings. 
Address 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



STALLION CARDS 



Folders, Posters and Pamphlets 
Compiled and Printed. 

PEDIGREES 

TABULATED 

Giving Performances of the get of 
sires and dams. Typewritten, 
ready to frame. 

STALLION SERVICE 

BOOKS, $1.00 

With index and blank notes for ser- 
vice fee. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
616 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

STALLION FOB LEASE. 



" Not wishing to train him this year, I 
will lease to a responsible party on 
liberal terms, for the stud season of 
1908, a five-year-old stallion by Sidney 
Dillon (sire of Lou Dillon 1:58%), dam 
Lady well 2:16% (dam of Local 2:19%), 
by Electioneer; second dam Lady 
Lowell, dam of two in list, by SchultZ'S 
St. Clair. This young horse is a solid 
built fellow, well made all over, and 
will weigh about 1,000 pounds. Should 
sire speed from all sorts of mares. For 
further particulars address JOE CUI- 
CBLLO, Fleasanton, Cal. 



HIGH-CLASS CARRIAGE TEAM FOB 
SALE. 



Geldings, solid .bay, handsome, per- 
fect match, five and six years old, 16 
hands, weigh 1.200 pounds each. Very 
toppy, rapid walkers and travelers. Fine 
knee and hock action, broken single and 
double, not afraid of cars or automo- 
biales. Gentle disposition, absolutely 
sound, guaranteed without blemish, 

Also two single driving horses, seal 
brown and a bay. Four and five years 
old, 15. 3 to 16 hands high, weigh 1.100 
and 1,150 pounds. Either one can trot 
a three-minute gait. Very handsome, 
gentle and sound. All these horses are 
in Bret-class condition. Appaiy to h. 
OLSEN, 814 B St., Haywards, Cal. 



FOB SALE. 



Beautiful black mare, standard bred, 
height 16 hands, age five and n half 
years; fast walker; can trot or pace. 
Has shown as good as 2:35 on three 
weeks' work. For further particulars 
enquire at H. KAYSER, Buss House, 
San Jose, Cal. 



IMPORTED HACKNEY 



STALLIONS 

If 



At one-half other people's prlc 
you want bargains, write at once to 
P. P. STE RICHER, West Orange, N. J. 



Racing ! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

Oakland Race Track 

OPENING DAY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 

Races Commence at 1:40 P. M., Sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 
20 minutes until 1:40 P. M. No 
smoking in the last two cars, which 
are reserved for ladies and their 
escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



STAM B. FILLY FOB SALE. 



A coming three-year-old, entered and 
paid up on in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
and Stanford Stakes, sired by Stam B. 
2:11%, clam Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%; 
second dam Flora H., dam of Thomp- 
son 2:14%, and Bonetti (trial 2:14%); 
third and fourth dams by producing 
sires. Is now in Henry Helman's string 
at Pleasanton, where she can be seen. 
Trotted a mile in 2:50 as a two-year-old. 
An excellent prospect. For further par- 
ticulars address HENBY HAHN. 2125 
Buena Vista Ave., Alameda. 

W. HIGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office With E. Stewart & Co., 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DUR- 

HAMS — Dairy Stock a specialty. Hogs, 

Poultry. Established 1876. Wm. Niles 
& Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS"-QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef 
and milking families for sale. Write us 
what you want. Howard Cattle Co., San 
Mateo. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland. Oregon. 

FOB SALE CHEAP. 



Combination horse, five years old. 
Shows all gaits under saddle, singlo- 
foots three-minute gait, trots square to 
buggy, very showy, trick horse. Lady 
can drive or ride. Swellest riding horse 
on the Coast. Sound, and can be 
taught anything. Suite li to 14, 2011 

Mariposa St., Fresno, Cal. 

JACK FOB SALE. 



Weighs 1,000 pounds, Is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Applv to 

S. B. WBIGHT, 

Santa Bosa Cal. 

STALLION WANTED. 



A high acting trotting stallion that 
will weigh close to or fully 1,300 
pounds. Is high headed, stylish, of good 
conformation, and a sure foal getter. 
Record no object. Address giving pedi- 
gree and description and price wanted 
B. M. H., Care Breeder and Sportsman, 
P. O. Box 417, San Francisco, Cal. 

TWO PACING STALLION COLTS 
WANTED. 



A yearling or two-year-old by Star 
Pointer and one by Zombro. Must be 
goorl color, natural pacers. standard 
bred and registered, or eligible to regis- 
tration. Bay or brown, little or no 
white, of good size, neat heads, not too 
high on leg. standing and traveling 
square on their feet. Must have 
plenty of knee and hock action. Musi 
be absolutely sound and out of good 
mares. Address giving price, pedigree 
and full particulars as to speed, if 
worked, etc., F. W. KELLEY, Breeder 
and Sportsman, 366 Pacific Building, 
San Francisco. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 




30 Head a * our nex * Combination Sale, 

^1- MONDAY EVENING, FEB'V 24, '08. 

Stock Stallions -- Speed Prospects - Business Horses 

John Norton consigns Gossiper Jr. 
and four good prospects. 

Dr. W. H. Button will sell Docus D. 

42259. 

H«nry Hahn sends the good Ally Ala- 
hieda. She is now in training at Pleas- 
anton in Henry Helman's stable. 

Sam Norris consigns Lomo Wilkes,, a 
handsome son of Lynwood W. 

James D. Johnstone of Elmlnirst sends 
four head of good looking and good 
mannered prospects. 

Mr. J. Francis Heenan of Sacramento 
consigns a fancy road mare, sired bv 
Knight 

George A. Newhall will sell a Parrott- 
bred pair of high acting cobs, a T. 
cart and harness. 

James Guerin, E. A. Swaby and others consign Useful horses of 
good age, ready for immediate use. 

Send For Catalogues, and Don't Miss the Sale. 

FRED. H. CHASE & CO. - - 478 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



Bonnie Direct 2:05 1 Feetorwssioo 
Bonnie Steinway 2:06 1 ^ to uos sm 

l -iiiil ivlurn privilege. Good pasturajre. 

< 'has. ( : i; 1 1 1 111 1 . IMeasanton, Cal. 



wmm 



Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on band. It im- 
proves and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers 
for it. Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food 
Co., C. P. Kertel, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



1874 



Singmaster Bros. 



1908 



DHPOHTEHS, IIHKKOEKS tNII HE.M KIW IN 

Percheron, French Draft or Norman, French and German Coach and Shire 
Stallions.— $1000 to $1800 at the Sales Stables. 

Who pays the expense of the salesman in peddling horses over the country? By 
buying fight "t our door this money is saved to the buyer. 

C. 0. STANTON, Sax Joke Maxaokb. 
North Fifth St. San Jose, Cal. 



Aerolite 



2 y. o. Record 2:1 5^ 
3-y.-o. Record 2:11] 



■ Ml 



ibition 



2:05 



1 



By Searchlight 2:03' i; Dam Trix by Nutwood Wilkei 2:16' j. Sin- of Fohn A. McKerron 2:04}<, 
i hi >a Mi- < Ira S:07M, TiflaJ Wa¥€ Slit©. Mujs IdShd 2:09H. etc. 

Dam Trix, .lain Of HuUa Wilk.s 2:0§H aild 3 Other* mil hy illtT'ivnl Jin-n that have beaten _':l. r >. 
Anioni; them Mnurtrix. thai ndswl out l!ay o'l.iglit last season In •_ , sl:» , i. rfhe is destined to be one of 

the greatest df broodniares. as everythiiiit she produces shows .-xtr.-ni.- -i d: wcond iLuu Trlxy by 

DtrefeWr2:17: third darn Mlstitilef (dahldf Brilliant, sire of Brilllantlile 2:17*4) by TuCkahO 2!2fr)fc 
sun fit riaxtail : fourth dam Lul > by IVorin Blue Hull : fifth dam Kannjr Kern by Irwin's TUckahOe and 
sixth dam by LelHer's Consul (thorOUghBred). 

Will mftke the St'ilsitli at PLEASANT0N, Cal. (limited M « aimro»Baiiiare».1 
Fee: $50 for the Season, old non-breeding mares ttten. fetorae $5 ptt 

month. All lulls tn U' paid lictorc removal ot mare. 

to (jet with foal. Ship mares to Sutherland & Chadbourne, Pleasanton, Cal. 

Kor further particulars apply to or address 

J. W. Marshall, Dixon) I lal., < >r Sutherland & Chadbourne, Pleasanton, Cal. 



WRITE BREEZE. HE'£l THE DOCTOR. 

TELL HIM YOUR CARBURETER TROUBLES. 

If your Gas Engine, whether It Is In an automobile or boat, does not run to 
suit you GET A TEXT BOOK SENT FREE. 

Agents: 

New York — Breeze Carbureter Co., 101 W. 66th St. Philadelphia — Rittenhouse 
Garage, 214 So. 23d St. Toronto, Ontario, Can. — E. R. McKinlay, 16 
Seaforth Ave. Chicagcs— Thos. H. McNevin, 70 La Salle St. 
Roston — V. J. Jacobs, 46 Columbus Ave. 

AGENTS WANTED EVERYW H ERE— Bl G THING. 
Our Terms are Right. Our Goods are Right. There's Money In It 

BREEZE CARBURETER CO., 

280 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 



$16,700 



Guaranteed Stakes for 4 Days 

Meeting to be held in August, 1908. 



$16,700 



PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Entries to Close Wednesday, April 1, 1908 



PR< >GRAMME. 



Wednesday. 

1 — 2:14 CLASS TROTTING • • ■ $ 800 

2— 2:20 CLASS TROTTING. CALIFORNIA STAKES • • 2000 

3— 2:08 CLASS PACING ... 800 

Thursday. 

4 — TwoYearOltl Trotting Division Futurity Stakes No. 6 (Closed 

December 4, 1905) • ■ $1450 

5— 2:14 CLASS PACING • . • 800 

6— Three-Year-Old Pacing Division Futurity Stakes No. 5 (Closed^ 

( tatober 15, 1904 > - - 1300 



Friday. 



7 — Two-Year-01d Pacing Division Futurity Stakes No. 6 (Closed 

December I. 1905) - - S 950 

8 — Three-Year-Old Trotting Division Futurity Stakes No. 5 (Closed 

October 15, 1904) - - - 3300 

9— 2:05 CLASS PACING - - - 1000 

10— FOUR-YEAR-OLDS TROTTING 2:20 CLASS - - 500 

Saturday. 

11— 2:17 CLASS TROTTING - - - $ 800 

12— 2:20 CLASS PACING, PACIFIC SLOPE STAKES - - 2000 

13— 2:10 CLASS TROTTING - - - 1000 



Entries in Stakes Nos. I. l'. ::. •"">. !., in. U, 12 ami I:; dose "WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 11108. Horses to be named with entry. 

Entrance Fee two per cent, due April l. 1908; per cent additional if not declared out <>n ,, r before May 1. 1,908, ami two per cent additional if not declared out on or 

before June I. 1908; live per cent additional from winners. 

Nominators have the right of entering two hones from the same stable in any race by the payment of one per cent for that privilege, due when entry is made. Only one of the two horses so entered 
to be started in the race and the starter to be named by 5 o'clock P. M. the day before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Money divided 50-25-15 and 10 per cent. All races mile heats, best in •">. except for two-year-olds. 

Member National Trotting Association. 

For entry blanks and further information address the Secretary. 

E. P. HEALD, 

President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

366 Pacific Building, 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



Saturday, February l, 190S.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



The Highest Average 

FOR THE YEAR OF 1907 
was made by Mr. Fred Gilbert who, of course, used 

DUPONT SMOKELESS 

THE OFFICIAL RECORDS show that during 1907 Mr. Gilbert shot 
at 9,195 targets and broke 8,817 

A Grand Average of 95.89 Per Cent 

ELEVEN of the 16 men who made AN AVERAGE OF 93 
PER CENT or better used 

Dupont Brands 

OF SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

The Highest Amateur Average 

(94.5 PER CENT) 
was made by an Illinois amateur, who also used 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE LONGEST RUN OF THE YEAR 

271 STRAIGHT 

made by J. M. Hawkins with 

Dupont Smokeless 

THE POWDER THAT MAKES AND BREAKS RECORDS 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



GOLCHER BROS., 

Formerly of Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 

FISHING TACKLE 
AMMUNITION 
SPORTING GOODS 




9 
9 
9 
9 

i 

9 
9 

5 

9 

I 

" 9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



511 Market St., San Francisco f 



£ Telephone 

^ Temporary 1883 w»« »>«m»v» »»»~" « • ~*« — — "•»?» g 



General Watts 2:06%, World'8 Champion three-year- old 
stallion by 



"AXWORTHY" (3) 2:15y 2 

And winner of American Horse Breeder Futurity. It payB to 
book to such a sire. 

when writing ki,., in fhe Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

mention this journal r J 




TaheUtln 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WlndpufTs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Quinn's Ointment 



It has saved t) 
cart and the bl 
ho conducts one of t 



tumuid* of goo'l honteti from the pfddh'r'i 
oken-duwn hoi-Me murket. Mr. C*. H. Pick- 
largest li vury Htahles In the Northwest, 



| ens, of Minneapolis, Minn, 
vrites as foil 
mccess. 1 tak 
I out It In bis 

»PHct>»I.OO per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mull, 

^T^A^ W.B.Eddy&Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



>linoHa Minn who ConniH IS uiieuiHiHni(iwui'w,?ii.««iniu vuw v. "wow 
owg- i'have'beenUBli'K Quinn's Ointment for some time ami with tho {trcatot i 
ike nlpiiHiirnln reroniniciidliiK It to my friends. No horncman nhoiild bo with- 1 
stable K"?curlH. -pllnts. simvlns, W&dpaffiand all bunrh.H It has no mat." 



Write us for circulars. 




Kinney Lou 2:07 

Reg. No. 37621 

FASTEST TROTTING son OF Till QREAT McKINNKY 2:11%. 




] $100 for the Season 

Diamond Mac 



t iadi or approved not,'. 
Usual return privilege. 



l ive yean old by Kisniv Lot 2:07%; dnin by Don Marvin. 
,\ grand 1 Individual and highly bred young hone. 

Cash or approved note. 
I'sutil return privilege. 



$30 for the Season 



•n,e above Btauiom, win .tend a, SANTA CLARA, Cal. 

llest of cure taken of mares, l'or further particulars address 

££■?£?: BUDD DOBLE, 15 North 1st St, San Jose, Cal. 



BIRDMAN 



HAS THE BLOOD OF CHAMPIONS IN HIS VEINS. 
Sired by Antrim 5918 (sire of Anzell a 2:06%, and dam of Vision 2:09%). 
First dam Birdie by Jay Bird 5060, sire of Hawthorne 2:06%, Allerton 
2:09%, Early Bird 2:10, Invader 2:10, Gitchie Manitou 2:09% and dams of 
Crescent Route 2:08y 2 , Codero 2:09% and Bessie Drake 2:08%. 

Second dam Lady Lyle by Geo. Wilkes; third dam Dame Tansey, dam of 
two, by Daniel Lambert. 

Will Make the Season of 1908 at Pleasanton. — $50 to Insure. 
Address 

THOS. RONAN, Pleasanton. Cal. 



Do You Want the Best? 



Breed Your Mares to 



Zombro 2:11 



Son of McKinney 2:11% and Whisper by Almont Lightning. 
Service Fee — $50. 

Zombro holds the Coast record (2: 13) for three-year-old trotting stallions. 
His daughter, Bellemont 2:09%, holds Coast trotting record for three-year-old 
fillies. His son, Hymettus 2:08% hoi ds world's race record for three-year-old 
geldings. Zombro has four in the 2:10 list, ten in the'2:15 list and seven- 
teen in the 2:20 list. He has won more first prizes in the show ring than any 
other stallion in California, among them the gold medal at the great Port- 
land Fair — over eighteen competitors. His colts always sell for big prices. 
Address 

GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3949 South Figueroa Street, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

STALLION FOLDERS 

■ 

Stallion Cards and Posters 

COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know AND WE WILL DO THE REST. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures made 
from Photographs. 

Stallion Service Books $1.00. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
Pacific Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIC 
IODOFORM 



GALL REMEDY 



IODOFORM " 



GALL REMEDY 



FOR 

HARNESS & SHOUtOER GALLS BARBED WIRE CUTS.J 
^ CALKS. SCRATCHES AND OTHER Ay 

«5- 



jjj, AILMENTS OF THE SKIN. 




For GALL. BACKS and SHOULDIOks 
CRUPPER SORES and SADDLE OALLJi 
there Is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 
USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS. 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES. 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN It has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
rolsoning. We placed It on the market 
relying wholly on Its merit for success. 
The sales of 1906 were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Qall Remedy preceding that year. This 
Increase was entirely due to Its MERITS, 
and it la Till: CALL REM El > Y <)E THE 
20th CENTURY. 

It is quick and sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
which Injure ami often lay up race 
horses. 

Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1319. 



All Trainers Should Keep it in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00 

(Read our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jasi B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois 
Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them 
to write any Jobber for it. 



1G 



[Saturday, February 1, 1908. 





NEW WORLD'S RECORD 

15,000 Targets Without a Miss 

J. W. Akard's claim to the title, "The King of Rifle Shots," is well earned. His performance of breaking 15,000 
regulation clay targets without a miss is the greatest exhibition of skill on record. He used one shot only for each 
target. He threw his targets with his right hand, holding his gun with his left. He used 

U. M. C. .22 SHORT CARTRIDGES 

whose perfect quality supported his perfect aim. A great per cent of the targets were broken edgeways, so that the 
diameter of the disc does not truly represent the size of the moving target in the air. Mr. Akard's earlier run of 1,659 
small marbles without a miss is nearly twice as long as any previous record on similar objects. In this case, also, he 
did his own tossing. Remember that Mr. Akard's run of 15,000 targets was unfinished. Mr. Akard is now giving demon- 
strations on the Coast. 

U. M. C. CARTRIDGES EXCEL IN CLEANLINESS AND ACCURACY 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Write to M. HARTLEY COMPANY, Sole Representative 
313-315 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 





A RECORD THAT IS A RECORD 

Adolph Topperwein makes Straight runs of 14,540, 13,599, 13,292 and 13,219 on 2^-inch 
wooden blocks at 20 foot rise, and misses only 4 out of 50,000 and 9 out of 72,500, shooting 

WINCHESTER 

SMOKELESS POWDER CARTRIDGES AND .22 CALIBER RIFLES 

Just to show that all things ARE POSSIBLE with Winchester .22 Caliber Cartridges and 
Rifles, and also to prove "Who's Who" in making rifle records IN PUBLIC, Mr. Topper- 
wein recently shot for ten consecutive days at San Antonio, Texas, and made the above 
world's records for wing shooting with a rifle. He used only two rifles and loaded them 
himself. These record-breaking, history-making scores were made, without the aid of a 
notary public, before large crowds of people in a public park — not in a far-away back lot 
or down on the farm behind the barn. 



RED 



W 



RECORDS 



ARE 



ALWAYS 



RELIABLE 



If Not Satisfied 



With the gun you are now using, Try a 

PARKER. High grade, hard hitting, perfect 

pattern, skilled workmanship, exact balance, 
fine finish. From $37.50 up. 

Built by the oldest gun manufacturers in America. 
Write for Catalogue. 

PARKER BROS. 



N. Y. SALESROOMS, 
32 Warren Street 



MERIDEN, CONN. 



BOLT 3 BOLT 2 . 



BOLT 1 



COIL MAIN SPRING 



THREE BOLT 



Our 1907 New Model Three Bolted Gun embodies all of the requisite 
qualities of a perfect gun — safety, strength, durability, superior shoot- 
ing qualities, beautiful lines, nice balance, and in our high grade guns 
very fine finish and richness of ornamentation. See cut No. 7 $300 list 
gun shown above — special price $213.75, ejector $3 extra We guarantee 
the three bolts to hold the gun tight for all time and not allow the gun 
to fly open in discharging. We guarantee the coil main springs forever 
against breaks and miss-fires. 

Send for 1907 Art Catalog describing improvements and special prices 
on eighteen grades $17.75 net to $300 list. 



ITHACA GUN CO., Dept. 15 ITHACA, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Branch: Phil R. Bekeart Co., 717 Market St., San Francisco 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 8, 1908. 



SO HmH at our next Combination Sale, 

UV MONDAY EVENING, FEB'Y 24, '08. 

Stock Stallions -- Speed Prospects -- Business Horses 



L 



John Norton consigns Gossiper Jr. 
and four good prospects. 

Dr. W. H. Button will sell Docus D. 

42259. 

Henry Hahn sends the good Ally Ala- 
meda. She is now in training at Pleas- 
anton in Henry Helman's stable. 

Sam Norris consigns Lomo Wilkes, a 
handsome son of Lynwood W. 

James D. Johnstone of Elmhurst sends 
four head of good looking and good 
mannered prospects. 

Mr. J. Francis Heenan of Sacramento 
consigns a fancy road mare, sired by 
Knight. 

George A. Newhall will sell a Parrott- 
bred pair of high acting cobs, a T. 
cart and harness. 
Swaby and others consign useful horses of 



James Guerin, E. A 
good age, ready for immediate use. 

Send For Catalogues, and Don't Miss the Sale. 

FRED. H. CHASE & CO. - - 478 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



CAPITAL $3,000,000 



SURPLUS $3,200,000 



The First National Bank 

Of SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. Travelers Letters of Credit is- 
sued, available in all the large cities of the world. 

Steel Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

In vaults that successfully withstood the fire of April, 1906. Trunks, Silver- 
ware and Packages Containing Valuables taken on storage in fire and burglar 
proof steel vaults. 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»»♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦»»♦»»»♦■; !>♦»»♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ » 

I The ROSS McMAHON ! 

* I 

Awning and Tent Co. 

Tents, Hammocks, Awnings and Covers. CampiDg Outfits for Hunting 

and Fishing Trips. * 

* 

73 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. I 

Phone Temporary 2030. * 



McMurray - McMurray 

McMURRAY 

Sulkies and 
Jogging 
Carts 

Standard the World Over. 

Address for printed matter and 
prices 

W. J. KENNEY, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sales Agent for California. 

McMurray - McMurray 




Four more In 2:15 have already been credited this season to 



"McKINNEY" 2:liy 4 



Making: his wonderful list still more remarkable. 



Slili^oS The Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 



The Stallion Number 



OF THE 



Breeder and Sportsman 



AY ill be issued February 15th, 1908. It will have a hand- 
some cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 



If You Own a Stallion 



Don't fail to advertise him in this issue, as an advertisement 
of your horse in this number will reach every man on the 
Coast who owns a good mare. 



If You Own a Mare 



You will find this number very interesting, as it will con- 
lain the stallion announcements giving particulars as to 
description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the best horses on 
the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide 
on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
HARNESS HORSES? 



If so, you will be interested in reading this number, as it 
will contain statistics and news that will be valuable and 
entertaining. 



In place of getting out the usual large Christmas 
number of the Beeeder and Sportsman last month, it was 
decided to make a special effort and get out a handsome 
stallion issue, and the date of February 15th was selected 
as Christmas comes too early for an issue of this descrip- 
tion. Owners of stallions who wish illustrations of their 
horses to appear in this issue should have photographs 
prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. 
A specially low price has been decided on for advertising 
in this issue, placing it within the reach of all. Write 
for price and particulars. 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, February 8, 190S.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 18S2.) 
F. W. KELLEV. Proprietor 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 Pacific Building, 
Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Posto/flce. 



Terms— One Year J3; Six Months $1.75 : Three Months $1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or lettei 
Addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 447. San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Communications must be a -companled by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of go 'd faith. 



AN INTER-CITY MATINEE, in which representa- 
tive horses from the different amateur driving clubs 
in California would compete for prizes, would prove 
a most attractive entertainment and arouse a spirit 
of generous rivalry between different sections that 
could not help result in increased interest in the 
driving horse. San Francisco, Los Angeles, River- 
side, San Bernardino, Fresno, Pleasanton, Santa 
Rosa, Sacramento, Stockton and other places all 
have well organized and thriving clubs, and it should 
be easily possible for a convention of these clubs to 
be held, at which a series of inter-city meetings 
could be arranged and cups provided for the win- 
ners of the principal events. After classes were 
arranged and a place and date selected each club 
could name the horses to represent it at the meet- 
ing, and when the date arrived there is little doubt 
but one of the largest crowds ever seen on a 
California trotting track would be present to see 
the sport. The Eastern matinee clubs have made a 
great success of these inter-city matinees and the 
fastest trotters and pacers in the country have com- 
peted for the cups. The League of Amateur Driving 
Clubs, to which the leading Eastern organizations 
belong, is a very strong body, and wields a large 
influence in all things that relate to the improvement 
and the management of amateur harness racing. If 
the California clubs could come into membership 
with this league, and hold all their races according 
to its rules, it would be possible in the future for 
California to be represented in the big annual meet- 
ings held at Cleveland and other points, and our 
horses might be able to bring some of those elegant 
challenge cups to California. We advise the mem- 
bers of our California amateur driving clubs to give 
the project of an inter-city matinee due considera- 
tion, believing that it will lead to excellent results 
in the near future. 



ANOTHER RACE at six furlongs, in which the 
winner was donated to the New California Jockey 
Club Breeding Bureau, was held at Emeryville on 
Tuesday last. It was won by the four-year-old stal- 
lion Galvestonian by Galveston-Dovey Montrose. In 
its form chart on the races that day, the San Fran- 
cisco Chronicle made this comment on this race: "A 
very poor lot, and little or no form obtainable on 
them." And this is the sort of stallions that are to 
be used to "improve" the breed of California horses. 
The Chronicle suggests that it would be better if 
betting were cut out of these Breeding Bureau races, 
as "this race had a Tiad look to it, and the same 
thing was true of each of the other two donation 
races," that have been held. The Chronicle also 
adds: "It would do away with scandal if the asso- 
ciation were to cut out the betting feature in con- 
nection with the Breeding Bureau races. Surely any 
owner who, under existing conditions, is willing to 
contribute a horse to the Bureau for $500 would not 
shy at putting his horse in a race of this kind if 
there were nothing more in sight for him than the 
$500 purse. In that event the ostensible purpose of 
the Breeding Bureau races would be just as well 
served as it is now." We commend the Chronicle's 
comments on these races to the farmers and horse 
breeders of California who are being asked to send 
mares to these thoroughbred stallions that are find- 
ing it difficult to defeat one another in six-furlong 
races with light weight up. 



THE HORSE FOR THE FARMER to breed and 
raise is the horse that will sell most readily and 
at the most profit on the market. The wealthy 
farmer who has plenty of money and time to devote 
to developing his ideas in regard to horse breeding, 
can afford to experiment, but the average farmer 
who must sell the surplus stock not needed in work- 
ing his land, should aim to produce the sort that 
there is a constant demand for. Good individuals 
of any distinct breed, will always bring a fair price 
in the salesring, but the ordinary one is slow sale 
except in boom times when "everything goes." If 
a farmer owns mares of the draft type, even though 
they be only grades, he should select the very best 
stallion of that type within his reach. If his mares 
are trotting-bred he should send them to a good 
trotting stallion, and always breed to improve what 
he has in beauty, conformation and soundness. He 
should avoid being led astray by the man with a 
grade stallion, or one of a different type than his 
mares, who will argue that the cross will make 
ideal carriage horses. Ever since horse-breeding 
has been carried on in America, there have been men 
engaged in breeding big, coarse mares to thorough- 
bred stallions with the idea of producing carriage 
horses, and where one animal suitable for a carriage 
has been produced by such mating, there have been 
a hundred nondescripts which reached the peddler's 
wagon before they were five years old. If a breeder 
desires the thoroughbred cross in producing harness 
horses of any description, let him start with a 
thoroughbred mare, or one that is part thorough- 
bred, but not with the thoroughbred stallion. Breeds 
of horses for different purposes are too well es- 
tablished to go back to cross breeding at this time. 
Men with plenty of money to spend, who have 
certain theories of breeding which they desire to 
develop, are the ones to try tnese experiments, not 
the farmer whose time is mostly taken up with 
making a living and trying to save a little for the 
proverbial rainy day. The wise farmer who engages 
in horse breeding, will post himself as to the sort 
of horse that is in demand every day, which is the 
one that is a high type of some already established 
breed. 



THE TIME IS HERE when those who have con- 
trol of the trotting tracks in California should make 
some move toward announcing harness meetings for 
1908. It is worse than foolish to wait for two or 
three months and then rush through a program, 
half advertise it, and expect horsemen to fill the 
purses. The time to act is now, and the tracks 
making the earliest announcements will secure the 
largest lists of entries, and therefore stand the best 
chance of making a profit. Salinas, Pleasanton, 
Santa Rosa, Woodland, Stockton, Fresno, Los Angeles 
and other points can give successful meetings and 
probably will, but the earlier they act in the way 
of making and advertising programs, the better for all 
concerned. A complete circuit, early arranged, will 
put twice as many horses in training as will be 
worked if the matter is put off for two or three 
months. The majority of owners who are willing to 
pay for the training of a horse want to see a few 
purses in sight, by entering in which they stand a 
chance to get some of their money back. We hope 
the California Circuit will some day be so organized 
that all dates will be selected and all programs an- 
nounced by the middle of February, and when that 
is done this State will be one of the most important 
harness racing centers in the whole country. We 
have the tracks and the horses, but for some reason 
we lack the men with sufficient enterprise and en- 
ergy to bring this condition of things about. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



S. G. Cousin, Cucamonga — The Joe Wheeler that 
sired your colt is bred as you state. The horse Joe 
Wheeler 2:07% was sired by Sidney Arnet, and his 
dam was by Grand Moor. He was a gelding and was 
sold to Honolulu parties several years ago; 



Frank Malcolm, Fresno — We cannot find any rec- 
ord of the stallion you mention. The burning of all 
our records in the big fire of 190G makes it almost 
impossible for us to trace the pedigrees of unreg- 
istered horses. 



S. J. W. — We do not know the breeding of Lady 
Signal any further than that she was by Signal 
3327. Signal was by Bunday's Bob Roy, a running 
bred horse, and his dam's breeding was tint raced. 
A colt that Is not registered can start in his first 
race under any name his owner desires to give him, 
but having once started the name cannot be changed 
without a payment of $50. 



THE HARVESTER BRINGS $9,000. 



At the Midwinter Horse auction, which opened at 
Madison Square Garden in New York on Tuesday 
of last week, The Harvester, a three-year-old colt, 
consigned by Walnut Hall Farm, brought $9,000. This 
colt is a brown stallion, foaled in 1905, and while 
broken, has never been trained. He is a fine looking 
colt, however, well bred, and can trot fast, and is 
entered and paid up on In $47,000 worth of stakes, 
as follows: Kentucky Futurity, $21,000; Horse Re- 
view purse, $10,000; American Horse Breeders' Fu- 
turity, $10,000; Kentucky Stock Farm purse, $6,000. 
Mr. Harkness stated that The Harvester could lead 
faster than any colt he ever saw. He was consigned 
to the Harkness sale last year, but had to be with- 
drawn on account of illness. The Harvester is by 
Walnut Hall 2:08%, dam Notelet by Moko, second 
dam Tablet by Cuyler 100, third dam Prefix by Pan- 
coast, fourth dam by Messenger Duroc, fifth dam by 
Volunteer, and sixth dam the famous broodmare 
Clara (dam of Dexter 2:17%, Dictator and others), 
by American Star. The price paid for the horse fur- 
nished one of the odd incidents of the offering. 
According to the judgment of the veteran driver, 
Splan, the breeder profited by something like $8,500 
because of the sickness that prevented The Har- 
vester from going into the sale two years ago, as 
he then would hardly have commanded a price above 
$250 to $500. 

Three wealthy patrons of harness racing were 
contenders for the horse — J. W. Daly of Mount Kisco, 
N. Y.; W. D. Sherman of Port Henry, and Mr. 
Uihlein bidding against each other through the con- 
test, Mr. Sherman's last bid being $6,000, and Mr. 
Daly's last bid $8,600. Then the successful buyer 
jumped the price to $9,000 and took the horse. The 
entire consignment of Walnut Farm horses, num- 
bering sixty-five, head brought a total of $27,245, 
averaging $420. 

o 

WORLD'S RECORD FOR STAR POINTER'S 
DAUGHTER. 

The Cleveland Leader says that a world's record 
made the past season and one that has been over- 
looked up to date by the usually alert turf scribes 
and statisticians, should be credited to the Cleveland 
pacing mare Alice Pointer 2:05%. daughter of Star 
Pointer 1:59%, and out of Alice M., the dam of Red 
Seal 2:10, Ballerton 2:17% and Allawood 2:17%. 
Alice Pointer is a Cleveland product in every sense 
of the word, having been bred by Two Minute Farm, 
being owned by David Shaw, having been trained 
and driven to her record by Mike McDevitt and all 
of her work the past season having been over the 
Glenville track. 

The world's record referred to is that for the 
fastest consecutive three-heat race by a green pacing 
mare and was made at the Cleveland Grand Circuit 
meeting last Summer, when the daughter of Star 
Pointer won the $1,500, 2:11 pace in 2:05%, 2:06 
and 2:07, an average of 2:06 1-6. The following 
week at Buffalo she captured the $10,000 Dominion 
of Canada stake in straight heats, in 2:05%, 2:07% 
and 2:06%, an average of 2:06 1-3. The Cleveland 
race was the mare's second start, the first having 
been at Detroit the previous week, where she got 
the word on a break in the opening heat and was 
distanced. 

o 

THE BEST EVIDENCE. 



The proof of the popularity and desirability of an 
article is always to be found in the demand for it. 
The demand for the No. 15 Perfected Racing Sulky, 
together with the Buckeye Carts and Speed Wagons, 
made by the McMurray Sulky Co., Marion, Ohio, is 
proof ]>ositive that they are popular, becoming more 
so every day. It is our candid opinion that any man 
having need for anything in the way of a sulky, cart, 
speed or road wagon should by all means get a cata- 
logue from the above firm. It will pay you. Mailed 
free upon application. Orders placed at this time 
can have special attention given to the finishing, etc., 
which is quite an advantage to the purchaser. 

o 

OUT OF CALENDARS. 



New York, January 31, 1908. 
Breeder and Sportsman: Please say to your read- 
ers that our supply of Axworthy calendars was quick- 
ly exhausted, but we have ordered another edition, 
which will be ready to mail in a very few days. 
Very truly yours, 

THE EMPIRE CITY FARMS. 

o 

Coney 2:02 is dead. He was found dead in his 
stall soon after being fed, and died with his eyes 
wide open and his limbs in a natural position as If 
lying down. He was the fastest pacer ever sired by 
McKinney, and was named by the late Tom Keating 
for his friend, Al Coney of San Francisco. 



Persimmon, the stallion owned by King Edward 
of England, with which he won the Derby In 1896, 
fractured his hip recently and his subscription list 
for the coming stud season has been cancelled, en- 
tailing a loss to the King of fully $60,000. It la 
thought the horse will recover, but it will take at 
least six months before he is sound again. 

o 

Only One "BROMO QUININE." 

That Is LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. Look for the 
signature of E. W. GROVE. Used the world over to 
Cure a Cold In One Day. 25 cents. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 8, 1908. 



+ + + * <i> + * •:• * -> * * .;. >> * •> .5. •> * 4- ❖ •:• •:• •> 

| NOTES AND NEWS ! 

- t 

Get the Stallion Number next week. 



Salinas will be in the circuit again this year. The 
old war horse, Mr. J. B. Iverson, will see that it is 
not left out. 



When you want a good rig of any sort to drive in 
the Park or elsewhere, call at the Dexter Prince 
Stables, corner Grove and Baker streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 



Thirty head of good stallions, speed prospects and 
business horses, to be sold at Fred H. Chase's pavil- 
ion on Valencia street, M onday evening, February 
24 th. 



Geo. A. White of Salinas has purchased from the 
estate of M. J. Smeltzer the seven-year-old chestnut 
horse Dictatus S., with a trotting record of 2:27%, 
made at Salinas in 1906. Dictatus S. is out of Fanny 
S. by Brown Jug, second dam Lady Lightfoot by 
Re Echo. 



Rain necessitated the postponement of the matinee 
races which were to have been held last Saturday 
by the Los Angeles Driving Club. The postponement 
was until to-day, but a very heavy rain there early 
in the week will probably cause another postpone- 
ment. 



The heavy rains of the past two weeks have 
caused the speed track in Golden Gate Park to be 
closed to all drivers. As soon as the rainy season 
is over the road horses will be kept very busy, how- 
ever, and by April, when the Park Amateur Driving 
Club will resume its matinee racing, there will be 
many horses in training for the cup events. 



A stupid blunder was made in these columns last 
week in attempting to correct the spelling of the 
name of the sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05%, which 
is correctly written Lottie Lynwood. In former is- 
sues the first name was spelled "Lotta," which is 
incorrect, as Lottie Lynwood is the name given her, 
and as she is the handsomest filly in California and 
a natural trotter, she and her owner, Mr. Geo. A. 
Pounder of Los Angeles are entitled to have her 
name correctly spelled in the newspapers. 



Fred Chadbourne is training for Mr. E. A. Servis 
of Rutte county, former owner of Edwin S. 2:08, a 
fine-year-old by Kinney Lou 2:07%, that is a natural 
pacer of the smooth going, oily kind, that gives every 
indication of being a fast one. 



Frank Work, of New York, has presented to W. 
E. D. Stokes the chestnut trotter Peter Stirling 
2:11%, winner of the Kentucky Futurity of 1901. 
Mr. Work paid $9,200 for him at auction shortly 
after this race, buying him, it was said, because he 
looked so much like Edward 2:19. Several attempts 
have been made to train him, but without much 
success. Mr. Stokes hopes, however, to yet see him 
fulfill the promise of his three-year-old form. Peter 
Stirling is a living illustration of the old saying, 
"No foot, no horse." His feet are as small as a 
mule's and are badly contracted at the heels. Other- 
wise he is said to be as good as ever he was. 



William H. Taft, Secretary of War and candidate 
for President, is an admirer of the American type 
of saddle horse. He recently purchased one that 
goes all the saddle gaits and that is up to carrying 
three hundred pounds. The animal is sixteen hands 
high, weighs 1,200 pounds, and is by Rex McDonald, 
a noted Missouri sire that was a lineal descendant 
of Gaines' Denmark. 



It is a curious fact that in Australia mules are 
scarce as the proverbial hens' teeth. With 3,000,000 
horses that progressive country has only 1,000 mules. 
South America is the stronghold of the equine hy- 
brids, that continent having 7,000,000 head. North 
America, including Mexico and Canada, has about 
4,000,000, Europe 1,500,000 and Africa 280,000. 



L. E. Brown, proprietor of Maple Lawn Farm, has 
purchased the great roan three-year-old Trampfast 
2:12%, and will use him in the stud as a private 
stallion this season. He will be bred to a number 
of the highly bred mares on the Maple Lawn Farm. 
It will be recalled that Trampfast took his record 
in the Kentucky Futurity for two-year-olds at Lex- 
ington last Fall, winning the first heat in 2:12% 
and the second in 2:16%. In this race he lowered 
the race record for two-year-olds which has stood at 
2:13% for a number of years. Trampfast is a rugged 
colt and comes from stout blood, being a grandson 
of Jay Bird. 



A three-year-old trotting bred colt sold for $9,000 
at the Midwinter sale in New York last week. None 
of the thirty head to be sold by Fred H. Chase & Co. 
at the pavilion, 478 Valencia street, on Monday even- 
ing, February 24th, is expected to bring that amount, 
but some good ones are in the consignment that 
may develop into $9000 horses in the future. You 
get them at your own price. 



Elisa S. 2:16%. the dam of the unbeaten pacer Sir 
lohn S 2:04%," dropped a colt on the night of 
January 23d, which W. L. Vance writes is "a born 
trotter or something else, which we will find out 
later." The colt is brown, with ooth hind feet white. 



S. K. Trefry has placed his fast four-year-old 
trotter Ben Hur in the stud this year at the low fee 
of $20. Ben Hur is not only a trotter himself, but 
he comes from a family of trotters. His sire is 
Stam B. 2:11%, and his dam Mountain Maiden by 
Cresco produced Kenneth C. 2:13%, and the two 
pacers Tom Carneal 2:08% and Miramonte 2:24%. 



A New York paper says: "When the biennial 
turf congress of the National Trotting Association 
is held in New York on February 12. it is almost 
certain that every driving club or association in this 
section of the country will be represented. The 
amateur clubs will be found lined up in favor of a 
change of the rules that will permit the driving 
clubs to hold regular meetings where money is taken 
at the gate and prizes offered and the horses 
winning heats not being penalized by the time made 
by them constituting a record or bar. While a great 
many horsemen doubt the wisdom of such a rule, 
it is quite sure that the amateurs will be solidly in 
favor of the concession to them. 



Mr. W. P. Murray, a prominent manufacturer of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and one of the leading members of 
the Driving Club there, has been spending the Winter 
with his family in Pasadena, and the other day saw 
a horse come tearing down the street, with a fright- 
ened small boy making a frantic but futile effort 
to stop him, while an old lady was lying on the floor 
of the vehicle overcome with fright. Mr. Murray 
weighs about 250 pounds, but is very active, and 
watching his chance as the horse approached him, 
made a lunge for the bit, and after being dragged 
a short distance brought the runaway to a stand- 
still. 



Over at the Alameda track Mr. H. Busing has a 
couple of stallions in the stud that are worthy of 
attention from breeders. One, Bonnie McKinney 
41383, is a standard and registered son of the great 
McKinney, his dam a fine mare by Rustic, second 
dam by Whippleton and third dam by Gladiator, all 
three sires being producers. Bonnie McKinney Is a 
large horse of fine proportions, and Mr. Busing has 
four or five of his colts to show prospective patrons 
and others how he breeds. The other stallion is Bon- 
nie Searchlight 34899, a registered son of Search- 
light 2:03%, sire of Arerolite (3) 2:11% and Ray 
o'Light (2) 2:13%. The dam of Bonnie Searchlight 
is Rita B. by Boodle Jr., second dam Gabilan Girl 
by Gabilan, and third dam Clara by Elmo. This 
breeding is excellent, and Bonnie Searchlight shows 
it. Mr. Busing will be pleased to show these two 
stallions at any time. Alameda track is very easy 
of access, trains running to within a few blocks 
every twenty minutes, and electrjc cars every five 
minutes. See the advertisement in this issue. 



Eight thousand dollars is the price that L. O. 
Brown paid for Trampfast (2) 2:12%, according to 
latest reports. It was first given out that $16,000 
was the price paid, but just half that figure is now 
said to be the correct one. It pays best to give 
the right figure first. 



William Matheson has purchased from Mr. H. W. 
Meek of San Lorenzo the stallion William Harold 
2:13% and will keep him at Danville. Contra Costa 
county, during the season of 1908. William Harold 
is by Sidney, and his dam, Cricket 2:10 by Stein way, 
was the first mare to pace in 2:10. Cricket is now 
the dam of six in the list. William Harold has sired 
Janice 2:08% and several other fast ones, and his 
get are good sized, smoothly turned trotters and 
pacers. 



Mr. Geo. H. Estabrook of Denver, Colo., has added 
a new one to his already formidable string of high 
class young trotters and pacers. The latest purchase 
is a two-year-old filly by Tregantle 2:09%, son of 
Simmons. The filly is out of Miss Fanny Summers 
2:26%, by Bow Bells 2:19%, second dam Florence D. 
2:29% by Jay Gould, third and fourth dams both pro- 
ducers. Mr. Estabrook purchased this filly from Mr. 
J. L. Tarlton of Lexington, Ky., on the advice of 
Gus Macey and Robert Strader, who say she is the 
best colt trotter they ever saw. She is now two years 
old and is engaged as follows: Kentucky Futurity, 
$20,000; Horse Review Stake, $10,000; Western 
Horseman Stake, $7,500. 



Every person who visits Pleasanton and sees the 
champion three-year-old Aerolite 2:11% (trial 
2:05%), now in his four-year-old form, marvels at 
his great muscular development and his rugged 
health and perfect soundness. When he is looked 
over in his stall or examined as he is being jogged 
on the road or track, a stranger would never guess 
that he has been raced both as a two and three- 
year-old, as he looks like a green four-year-old. 
Sutherland & Chadbourne have certainly taken good 
care of him and his condition shows it. His owner, 
.las. W. Marshall of Dixon, has had correspondence 
from the owners of some of the greatest mares in 
the country, who desire to breed them to Aerolite 
this year. His book will fill soon. 

o 

Your Stomach is O. K. if you drink Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



A subscriber of this paper desires to learn the 
present address of Mr. E. B. Smith, formerly of 
Knights Landing, Yolo county. Can any of our 
readers furnish it? 



Mr. C. D. Evans, the Healdsburg, Cal., druggist, 
writes us that he owns a mare by Milton Medium 
that will be thirty years old this spring and will 
have a foal in April. Mr. Evans does not state in 
his letter what stallion this old mare was bred to, 
but she certainly is a remarkable mare to breed at 
that age. 



W. J. Kenney, "the bike man," has just received 
a consignment of 1908 speed carts, sulkies and run- 
abouts, which are a decided departure from the old- 
style of vehicles. Kenney is always in the lead in 
introducing innovations for the use of trainers and 
drivers. His repair shop is the best place on the 
Coast to get a bike fixed so that it will run true and 
not wear the tire unnecessarily.. 



The old pacing champion Flying Jib 2:04 is still 
hale and hearty at Pleasanton, Where he is still 
owned by Mr. C. L. Griffith, whose father owned him 
before him. The Jib now occupies a comfortable box 
stall at Lee Wells' livery stable and the latter gives 
the old fellow regular airings to a light buggy when 
he shows all the style and fire of his youth, but is 
never allowed to go far enough or fast enough to tire 
him. He is now 23 years old, and if allowed his own 
way would not let any horse pass him on the road 
without a contest to see which was fastest. 



The Baron Wilkes family has become known as 
the Futurity winning family. Henry Helman of 
Pleasanton has two young stallions that are mem- 
bers of this famous faimly — Alconda Jay, who is by 
Jay Bird, out of a Baron Wilkes mare, and Baron 
Howies, who is by a son of Baron Wilkes and out 
of a mare by Dignus, sire of Johnny Agan 2:05%. 
Both these young stallions are bred well enough and 
have class enough to maintain the Baron Wilkes 
family reputation. 



If you want a good draft stallion or a coach stal- 
lion, write to C. O. Stanton, 497 North Fifth street, 
San Jose, and he will quote you prices that will 
seem small beside some of the prices that are being 
paid for horses of the same breeds. He invites in- 
spection of his stallions, and will sell them worth 
the money. He is the Coast agent for the big Iowa 
firm of Singmaster Bros. 



Uhlan, a black trotting gelding by Bingen 2:06%, 
obtained a wagon record of 2:13% last year as a 
three-year-old, and now $6,000 has been offered and 
refused for him. 



Two stallions that were prominent at Pleasanton 
a few years ago were shipped to Europe the other 
day. They were Lecco 2:09% and The Phantom 
2:10%. 



The horse is always the best drawing card at a 
live stock show. At the big live stock show held in 
Denver last month, the record crowd of the week 
was on Friday, when the horses were shown and 
judged. Twenty-six thousand people attended that 
day. 



An exchange tells of a horse that after being badly 
cut on one leg by a barb-wire stood on the other 
three for eight weeks without once lying down. 



We acknowledge with thanks receipt of an invita- 
tion to attend the horse parade and stallion show 
to be held at Livermore on Saturday, March 7th. 
With fair weather there will be a large attendance, 
and as there have been many new stallions brought 
into Alameda county during the past two years, the 
exhibition will doubtless be a most creditable one, 
and well worth seeing. 



The advertisement announcing his stallion Dictatus 
Medium for sale has been withdrawn by Mr. R. P. 
Lathrop of Hollister, as he has leased this magnifi- 
cent horse to "The Paicinas Rancho Company," a 
corporation that has recently purchased the well 
known Grogan ranch of San Benito county, and will 
engage in the breeding of draft horses, roadsters 
and fine cattle. The company could not have se- 
lected a better bred or finer individual than Dic- 
tatus Medium, and with the right sort of mares he 
will sire horses that will attract attention in the 
show ring and sell for good prices. 



There is a filly by Stam B. 2:11%, out of the good 
broodmare Henrietta by Boodle 2:12%, consigned 
to the Chase combination sale for Monday evening, 
February 24th, that should bring a good price and 
attract many bidders. She is entered and paid up 
on in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity and Stanford 
Stakes for this year. She is a trotter and showed 
very fast when being handled a little last year, and 
has been up since last November, and not been 
given much work yet, but is ready to begin on 
right now. She should trot below 2:20 by June, and 
win more money than she will sell for at this sale, 
but her owner has more colts than he can care for 
and must sell some. This filly is a good enough 
prospect for a stake winner. Her legs and feet 
are like iron and there is nothing wrong with her 
in any way. Here is an opportunity for some one 
to get a stake winner. , k 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Thos. F. Adkin of Rochester, N. Y., makes the 
following excellent suggestion in a letter to the 
Horse Review: "The three-year-old colt, which I 
sold to Count Hauser of Vienna, Austria, in 1906, 
stepped a mile last year as a three-year-old in 2:15%. 
This would give his dam, I,iska 2:28% (dam of 
Lisonjero 2:0814 and three others), another one 
in the list, if the record had been made in this 
country. It seems to me, in view of the fact that 
so many of our fast mares and stallions are going 
abroad, that the Register Association should make 
some arrangement to credit them and their produce 
with their foreign records. I believe that if you 
yould advocate this you would be doing the breed- 
ers of this country very great service." 



BIG SALE AT PLEASANTON. 



Will Logan, so well known as a writer and photo- 
grapher for different trotting horse journals, has 
quit journalism and entered the employment of Wil- 
liam Bradley, the millionaire New Yorker, who re- 
cently established Ardmeer Farm in New Jersey, 
and placed at its bead Todd 2:14%, for which he 
paid $30,000, and Guy Axworthy (4) 2:08%. 



The famous New York speedway along the Hudson 
River is to be used in the near future as a connect- 
ing road between the Boulevarde and Seventh Ave- 
nue, and will then be open to vehicles of every de- 
scription, thus spoiling it for a speedway. The 
Road Drivers' Association are to ask that a half- 
mile track be buin for them by the Park Commis- 
sioners, who have already set aside grounds for 
polo, baseball, tennis and other sports. 



SwanhildA, the pacing mare by Orkney Wilkes, 
that Chas. De Ryder took East in 1906, was sold 
at the Midwinter auction last week, bringing $610. 
She was purchased by Louis Berger of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Swanhilda was bred by W. S. McDonald of 
Concord, Cal., and is a very fast green mare, being 
credited with a trial of 2:08% and a half in 1:00%. 
De Ryder sold the mare for Mr. McDonald for more 
money than she brought at this sale. 



Riley Kent of Utah has a string of six or seven 
good trotters and pacers at the Pleasanton track and 
is getting them in shape for racing this season. 

W. T. McBride of Aberdeen, Wash., who purchased 
the promising two-year-old pacer Bonnie Antrim from 
A. P. Church of Pleasanton, will spend the winter 
at the horse center. Henry Helman says the pacer 
steps a little faster every time he is hooked up. 



Mr. R. P. Lathrop of Hollister has sold his stal- 
lion Mestoe to Mann & Cowell of Watsonville, who 
will use him in the stud. Mestoe sires horses of 
good color, size and nice trotting action, and many 
of his get make fine carriage horses. 



Mr. T. H. Ramsey, superintendent of the Cone 
Ranch at Red Bluff, was operated on at St. Francis 
Hospital in this city on January 20th for an injury 
received some time ago. His leg was broken, but 
the bone had not united properly, so the surgeons 
made a new fracture, and Mr. Ramsey is getting 
along nicely, with a prospect of getting out within 
the next three or four weeks. His many friends 
hope for a full and complete recovery for him, and 
that in due time he will be serviceably sound on this 
injured leg. 



Dr. Summerfleld of Santa Rosa has purchased the 
mare Alix B. 2:24% and will breed her to his elegant- 
ly bred young stallion Lord Dillon 39587, he by Sidney 
Dillon, out of Roblet 2:12 by Robin, second dam 
Eveline, the grandam of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, by 
Nutwood. Alix B. is herself an exceptionally well 
bred mare, as she was sired by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%, and is out of a full sister to Little Albeit 
2:10. Dr. Summerfleld has a small but very choice 
collection of broodmares on his farm near Santa 
Rosa and we expect to hear of stake winners being 
sent out from there within the next few years. 



The enterprising citizens of Pleasanton have de- 
cided to hold an annual sale of horses there each 
year, and have organized and set the inaugural dates 
for April 16th, 17th and 18th this year. The Pleas- 
anton Times of February 1st says in this connection: 

Pleasanton is to have; a horse sale. It will be the 
first and greatest of its kind ever held in California. 
It will last three days, April 16th, 17th and 18th. It 
will be in charge of a committee whose chairman is 
Chas. Dq Ryder. One hundred horses have already 
been consigned for the sale. It will be a great suc- 
cess. 

This movement has been inaugurated under the 
auspices of the Pleasanton Chamber of Commerce. 
It will immediately be widely advertised and will 
attract attention everywhere. The name and fame 
of Pleasanton is heralded wherever good horses are 
bred, and it is quite appropriate that this town 
should inaugurate a movement of so much import- 
ance to all lovers of any and all kinds of horse flesh. 

The advantages to accrue to Pleasanton from such 
a sale held annually are bound to be very great. The 
fame of Pleasanton will be spread even further than 
it is to-day, and it will stand out in even a stronger 
light than ever as the greatest horse center, not 
only in California, but on the entire Coast. The fact 
that the sale is to include all kinds of horses is one 
of the strongest features connected with it. It 
will stimulate the raising and cultivation of better 
horses in every section where people come in touch 
with the movement. Heretofore we have centered 
almost, entirely upon racing horses. Now Pleasan- 
ton is to be made the greatest market in all Califor- 
nia for all kinds of horses. These annual sales will 
gradually take on the proportions of the fairs of the 
older countries and the court days of our own South- 
ern States. Properly directed there is no doubt that 
these sales will mean much for Pleasanton and the 
entire valley. 

The idea originated with the horsemen themselves. 
It was brought to the attention of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and that body, ever ready to promote the 
material welfare of the town, promptly acted. On 
the invitation of President H. W. Furlong, a num- 
ber of prominent horsemen met at the Rose Hotel 
Wednesday evening. After first thoroughly discuss- 
ing the feasibility of the project and arriving at the 
conclusion that a success could be made of it, the 
meeting promptly organized a strong committee to 
take charge of the sale. 

Charles De Ryder, who is one of the best and 
most favorably known horsemen in the United States, 
was made chairman. With him is associated Henry 
Helman, whose practical experience and great suc- 
cess has given him such a high standing among 
horsemen everywhere. Other members of the com- 
mittee are R. C. Peach, the secretary, and F. P. 
Hellwig, Charles Griffith, Lee Wells and J. C. 
Kirkpatrick. 

The committee has decided to hold the sale April 
16th, 17th and 18th. Immediate steps will be taken 
to advertise the sale thoroughly all over the Coast, 
and to secure a large consignment of good horses. 
As already mentioned, over 100 head of draft and 
trotting bred horses have been consigned for the 
sale. The committee hopes to secure at least 150 
head more. Parties desiring to consign horses for 
the sale should do so early, in order to get the value 
of the advertising. No horses will be barred, but 
all entries will be scanned very critically by the 
committee in order that misrepresentation may be 
avoided, and all. who buy or sell may be assured of 
every market benefit. 

Entry blanks will be sent out immediately. 

The enthusiasm with which the event has been 
received by the horsemen, the fame of Pleasanton 
as a horse center, and the broad gauge character 
of the men in charge all mean that. Pleasanton has 
inaugurated an event that will become a feature of 
Northern California. 



HORSE PARADE AND STALLION SHOW. 



Saturday. February 8, 190S.] 



Geo. T. Beckers, owner of Zombro 2:11. announces 
that he will pay the transportation bill one wav on 
all mares shipped to Los Angeles from this section 
of California this spring to be bred to his great 
stallion. The get of Zombro grow more popular 
with breeders every year, as they are not onlv 
fast and good gaited troters, but uniformly hand- 
some and of good size. 



Hymettus 2:08%, the champion pacing three-year- 
old gelding by Zombro 2:11. is still the property of 
Mr. L. H. Todhunter of Sacramento, and has not 
been sold to Mr. Geo. H. Estabrook of Denver, as 
stated by several Eastern journals. When Mr. Esta- 
brook purchased through J. W. Zibbell the four- 
year-old mare by Seymour Wilkes 2:08%, dam by 
Silver Bow 2:16, sire of the dam of Hymettus 2:08%, 
one of the Denver daily papers got the item so 
badly mixed that it gave out the news that Hymettus 
was the horse purchased by Mr. Estabrook. Hy- 
mettus is still the property of his breeder, Mr. Tod- 
hunter, and has been romping around in a big pad- 
dock all winter. He has not -been sold although 
Mr. Todhunter will sell him if anyone will pay the 
price asked. Hymettus is now four years old, and 
one of the best prospects for a two-minute pacer 
there is in America. 



The filly by John A. MeKerron 2:04%, out of Lou 
Dillon 1:58%, owned by Mr. C. K. G. Billings, of 
Cleveland, is now being broken by "Doc" Tanner 
at the Cleveland track. She is a yearling now, and 
is large for her age, stoutly built and trotting gaited. 



Nearly 200,000 trotters and pacers are registered. 
Of these about 50,000 are stallions. 



Hawthorne 2:06% has missed twice to McKinney 
2:11% and will be bred to Moko this year. Her 
dam now twenty-two years old, is now safe in foal 
to Moko. 



J. J. Jermyn of Scranton, Pa., owns the gray 
pacing stallion Kendig 2:18% that took his record 
in 1906, and is thought to be a 2:05 horse. Kendig 
is by the California bred pacer Rokeby 2:13%, son 
of Director 2:17 and Lilly Stanley 2:17%. Kokeby 
was bred by Hon. Frank L. Coombs of Napa, who 
also bred Lilly Stanley. 



The last fast mile the great sire McKinney 2:11% 
trotted was in the spring of 1900, when Chas. A. 
Durfee's youngest son, Vincent Durfee, then a mere 
boy, drove the old stallion a mile in 2:24 at Pleasan- 
ton track. That was the year when the Tanforan 
Fair Association was organized to give a big fair, 
horse show and race meeting at the then newly 
constructed Tanforan Park, twelve miles south of 
San Francisco. A free-for-all trot for stallions was 
advertised for this meeting, and as McKinney was 
but thirteen years old, Mr. Durfee concluded he 
was about good enough to win that race were he 
trained for it, although the stallion had not been 
trained for years. Durfee had McKinney's son Ben 
Liebes in training that year, and after McKinney 
had been given some stiff jogging, young Vincent 
got up behind him one day while his father drove 
the colt and they worked a nice mile together in 
2:24, the the old horse fighting for his head all the 
way through the stretch at the end of the mile. It 
was afterwards decided not to race him, however, 
and he was never put in training again. His youth- 
ful driver maintains to this day, however, that if 
they had gone on with him he would have lowered 
his record to a certainty. 



The California State ''Agricultural Society has de- 
cided to open the State Fair of 1908 on August 29th 
and close it September 5th. This will give a seven 
days' fair, both the opening and closing day being 
on Saturday. The Oregon State Fair will open Sep- 
tember 14th, thus giving a full week for exhibitiors 
at the California Fair to ship their exhibits to 
Salem and get them placed in dme for opening day. 



Plans for the new Manufacturers' Building, to be 
erected at the State Fair grounds at Sacramento, 
have been accepted by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. The building will be 300 by 100 feet in width 
and will cost $30,000. It will be built by day's work. 
Plans are being prepared for another building, to 
be known as Machinery Hall, and it is expected that 
both buildings will be finished in time for use dur- 
ing the fair this year. 



A representative of one of the largest carriage and 
buggy factories in the United States says that the 
outlook at the present time is that the public will 
purchase more buggies and carriages in 1908 than 
they did in 1907, and that last year the sale was 
very large. 



Sonoma Girl 2:05% is still at the Crabtree farm, 
at Neponset, and will probably remain there with 
all the other horses of the stable and not be shipped 
south to winter, as first intended. It. is said that her 
feet and legs were never in better condition, and she 
is looked upon as certain to reduce her record ma- 
terially this year. 



The mare Lady Zombro, owned by F. H. Halloway 
of Hemet, Cal., slipped a filly foal by Geo. W. Mc- 
Kinney 2:14% last week. As this foal was entered 
in several rich Futurities, Mr. Halloway greatly re- 
grets the loss, expecting something extra good and 
speedy to result from this cross. 



The stables of James Y. Gatcomb at Concord, New 
Hampshire, were burned last week, but all the 
horses were saved. 



The citizens of Santa Cruz have asked the City 
Council to build a speed track in Laveaga Park, 
where it is said there is one of the finest locations 
in the world for a training track. It. is to be hoped 
that the Council will see its way clear to grant the 
request. 



The Columbus Driving Park Association may of- 
fer a $10,000 stake for 2:10 or 2:12 trotting stallions. 



The Midwinter sale at New York last week showed 
that, the prices of horses are keeping up well, and 
the average; was good in spite of the fact, that several 
consignments of young unregistered stock were of- 
fered. 



"Thirty head of good ones" are to be sold at Fred 
H. Chase & Co.'s sales yard on the evening of 
February 21th. Here is the chance to get one to 
drive on the road. 



Gambetta Wilkes, who now has about 200 in the 
list, is out of a marc by Gills Vermont 104, a grand- 
son of Black Hawk 5. A full brother to Gambetta 
Wilkes, called the King, was said to haves been the 
handsomest son of George Wilkes. 



Arrangements are now under way whereby Liver- 
more will, on Saturday, March 7th, hold a horse pa- 
rade; and a stallion show, and as it is now two years 
since an affair of this kind has been held, everything 
that can be done will be done to make the coming 
show one of the best ever held in the Livei-more 
Valley. The horse shows heretofore have always 
been productive of much good to the horse interests 
of this section and horsemen can further (heir inter- 
ests in no better way (ban by encouraging and keep- 
ing alive the horse shows. Many of (he stallions 
that have made the Livermore Valley famous as a 
horse-center are dead, but as there have beef) .'i 
number of new stallions brought to this section 
farmers through the coming show will be given 
a chance to inspect the new stock and select Btallioni 
with which to mate their mares the next breeding 
season and such of the new stallions as have colts 
old enough to show will be given an opportunity to 
show (hem. 

"The coming show Is not to be restricted to stal- 
lions alone, but. owners of mares, geldings, colts, 
fillies, saddle and driving horses are requested to 
make entries. No entrance fee will be required. 
The committee having the management of the show 
in hand earnestly ask the co-operation of all horse- 
men throughout the county. The officials are: 
H. M. Chrlstensen, president; Max Berlin, vice- 
president; Theo. Gomer, secretary; John Sweeney, 
treasurer; Frank Pennon, marshal; Wm. McDonald, 
announcer. 



» 



6 



THE HALF-MILE TRACKS. 



It is the opinion of those best posted on harness 
horse affairs that the half-mile tracks which are so 
numerous all through the country east of the Miss- 
issippi river, do more to foster and build up harness 
racing" and harness horse breeding than all other 
things combined. The fact that a half-mile track 
can be sustained as a training track with but little 
expense, keeps it in existence in hundreds of towns 
where mile tracks could not possibly be supported. 
For this reason this journal has often advised or- 
ganizations that were limited as to capital to con- 
struct a half-mile track for training as well as 
racing purposes, instancing the fact that some of 
the greatest fairs and race meetings in the Eastern 
country are held on grounds where there is only a 
half-mile ring. In this connection we take occasion 
to reproduce from an Eastern exchange the follow- 
ing article, written by Mr. Amos Whitely, one of 
the owners of White River Stock Farm, Muncie, 
Indianapolis: 

The very best way to advance the breeding in- 
terest is through the half-mile track meetings, and 
anything that tends to build up the interest in rac- 
ing on the half-mile tracks meets the approval of 
White River Stock Farm. 

I have, during the past three or four years, given 
this subject very careful consideration, and my ob- 
servations while attending meetings of the Grand 
and Great Western Circuits, and a number of the 
most prominent half-mile track meetings, has fully 
convinced me that the interest in the breeding and 
developing of high-class, useful horses, and race 
horses, can best be promoted through the race meet- 
ings on the half-mile tracks. 

While the Grand Circuit and Great Western Cir- 
cuit meetings, where the phenomenal trotters and 
pacers (the real racing machines) are practically in 
evidence, attract and interest a class of horsemen 
who are out for the big stakes, and I may say a 
class of good breeders, they do not interest the gen- 
eral breeder, including the small breeder, all of 
whom must be depended upon to advance the breed- 
ing interest. Comparatively few breeders attend 
those meetings, and the pace is too strenuous to in- 
terest them. 

What we need is high-class racing on the half- 
mile tracks that will attract and interest the horse- 
men generally, and cause the breeder generally, ad- 
ditional individual farmers to want to get into the 
game, at least to the extent of securing, for breeding 
purposes, one or two high-class, standard bred mares, 
to be bred to high-class sires every year, so the 
farmers and the farmer boys will be interested in 
the breaking and educating of colts every year, to 
prepare them for the races. 

What the managements of the leading half-mile 
tracks have been doing is good. Stakes for the 
green ones, and purses for the faster ones are all 
right. But in addition to this, in order to attract and 
interest the people and the local breeders who do 
not attend the great mile track meetings, special at- 
tention should be given to the free-for-all classes. 
Everybody wants to see some fast racing, and if the 
half-mile track managements will arrange for a 
free-for-all pace for one day, and a free-for-all trot 
for another day, with reasonably liberal purses that 
will secure high-class horses, such racing will at- 
tract attendance, interest the people, and largely in- 
crease the gate receipts. ' 

Give the people something in the nature of Grand 
Circuit racing on the half-mile tracks and they will 
do the rest. I believe I voice the sentiments of a 
number of breeders and horsemen when I say that 
while the White River Stock Farm does not care 
to maintain a racing stable to compete with the 
phenomenal trotters and pacers gathered from the 
whole United States in the Grand Circuit meetings, 
we will do our part in helping to boom the racing 
on the half-mile tracks. 

o 

A STAKE WINNER. 



It has been often said of the Directs that they 
have "the winning habit," and there is a son of Di- 
rect 2:05% now at Sacramento that has helped add 
to the truth of this statement. Almaden 2:22%, 
winner of the two-year-old trotting division of the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity, and of the Occident Stake 
the following year, is the horse we refer to. This 
young stallion was bred by Mr. C. A. Durfee, and 
is out of a fast mare by McKinney 2:11%, thus 
combining the blood of the two greatest 2:10 sires 
ever in California — Direct 2:05%, sire of twelve in 
the 2:10 list, and McKinney 2:11%, sire of seven- 
teen in that list. Almaden is a trotter, one of the 
good gaited sort, that will sire trotters. He would 
have been taken East last year by Chas. De Ryder, 
but was taken sick with impaction of the bowels, and 
for many days his life was despaired of. He re- 
covered, however, and is now at Sacramento for the 
season of 1908, in the hands of M. L. Lusk, and 
never looked finer in his life. There is a chance 
here to breed to a horse at a moderate fee that is 
certain to become a popular horse at a much higher 
fee before long. His colts show that they are the 
sort that will do to train, and while none are old 
enough to race, ask any horseman who has seen 
them and they will say no greater prospects are to 
be found in, the State. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE MIDWINTER SALE. 



At the Fasig-Tipton Midwinter sale held in New 
York last week five hundred horses were sold. There 
were many very ordinary horses consigned to the 
sale, and they brought little money, the average for 
the first day being but $143 per head, 104 head sell- 
ing for a total of $14,865. In this first day's sale 
were a lot of two-year-olds by an unregistered stal- 
lion of no reputation and there was absolutely no 
demand for them, weanlings and yearlings selling 
at from $15 to $75. 

During this first day of the sale Stambou, a seven- 
teen-year-old stallion by Stamboul, out of Bon Bon by 
Simmons, sold for $150. The old pacer Perhaps 
2:08, whose famous ringing tour in California as 
Walter K. is fresh in the memory of every Coast 
horseman, brought $160. He is ruled off all tracks 
and is now sixteen-years-old. 

Crown Princess, a mare bred by Mr. A. B. Spreck- 
els and foaled in 1899, was purchased by J. W. 
Daly for $415. This mare has a record of 2:13%. 
She is by Dexter Prince, out of a mare by Ante- 
volo, and was purchased by Mr. Daly for a brood- 
mare. 

Swanhilda by Orkney Wilkes fetched $610, and 
the fact that a few good ones were in the day's sales 
was what brought the average up to $143. 

On the second day the Walnut Farm horses were 
sold. There were sixty-four head in the consign- 
ment, and they brought a total of $27,085, an aver- 
age of $425 per head. Those by Moko brought 
within a few cents of $300 each, those by Walnut 
Hall averaged $606 and those by Mobel sold for an 
average of $186 per head. 

The star of the lot was The Harvester, three-year- 
old colt by Walnut Hall, dam by Moko. He sold 
for $9,000. 

On Thursday, the third day of the sale, good 
prices were received for many, the day's average 
being over $500 for the 112 head sold during the 
day. The sales for the three days up to Thursday 
evening were 356 head for a total of $124,860, an 
average of $347. 

Among the highest priced horses on Thursday were 
the following: 

Wilteen 2:15%, trotting stallion by Wilton, seven 
years old, $8,000. 

Palerna, bay mare, five years old, by Bingen, 
$2,725. 

Rex McKinney, black colt, three years old, by 
McKinney, dam Haughty by Baron Wilkes, $2,600. 

Princess Helen 2:05%, pacer, by The Beau Ideal, 
$2,600. 

Locust Jack 2:11, trotting gelding, seven years 
old, by Keller Thomas, $4,000. This horse made his 
record last year over a half-mile track. 

Thornway 2:05%, pacing stallion, ten years old, 
by Steinway, $850. 

The stallion The Bondsman was very sick on 
Thursday and it was not thought he would be offered 
for sale. 

A summary of the sale will appear in our stallion 
number next week. 

o 

MAKING HIS WAY. 



For years the stallion Iran Alto 2:12%, bred at 
the famous Palo Alto Farm and sold to James W. 
Rea of San Jose when a colt, was raced on the cir- 
cuit, and then placed in the stud and bred to his 
owner's mares. His opportunities were very limited, 
as Mr. Rea had many things to attend to in a political 
and business way, and the horse was really neglected 
so far as securing mares for him was concerned. A 
few years ago H. S. Hogoboom of Woodland, who is 
a pretty good judge of a horse, leased Iran Alto 
from Mr. Rea and since then has kept the stallion 
at woodland, where he has been bred to some good 
mares, and the colts are now beginning to show that 
Iran Alto is bound to be one of the best producing 
sires of California. From Mr. Rea's mares Iran Alto 
sired Dr.- Frasse 2:11%, Thomas R. 2:15 and other 
fast trotters, and now that his produce are owned 
by a large number of breeders they are not only be- 
ing entered in the colt stakes, but in their training 
are showing such speed that the horsemen all over 
the Coast are talking about them as certain future 
race winners. Iran Alto is by a stallion that held 
the world's stallion record in his day, Palo Alto 
2:08%, and is out of a mare that held the world's 
record as a three-year-old, and has since produced 
four with standard records and is the grandam of 
twelve. For his breeding and performances on the 
track and in the stud Iran Alto is standing at a very 
low fee, $30, but "live and let live" was always one 
of Mr. Hogoboom's favorite mottoes and he is help- 
ing the horse toward a reputation that is bound to 
be world wide. Iran Alto has never been pushed 
to the front by favoritism, but won his way there 
when on the track and is doing it again in the stud. 
o 

SADDLE GALL AND TUMOR CURED. 



Col. G. W. Jordan, Hawklnsvllle, Ga., writes: "With 
Quinn's Ointment I made two tests, one of which re- 
moved a saddle gall that I considered removable only 
by the knife, the other was an application to a small 
tumor two or three inches above the nostril of a favor- 
ite horse, this also disappeared after a few applications. 
1 consider the remedy invaluable." For curbs, splints, 
spavins, windpuffs and all blemishes use Quinn's Oint- 
ment. If cannot obtain from druggist or dealer, ad- 
dress W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall. N. Y. Price $1 
delivered. 



[Saturday, February 8, 1908. 



BIG MATINEE PLANNED. 



Plans are well under way which, if carried to a 
completion, will give New York the greatest amateur 
light harness meet ever held in that city, says the 
New York Times. With the elections of the New 
York Driving Club and Road Drivers Association com- 
pleted, horsemen will now turn their attention to 
the successful consummation of the project to bring 
together at the Brighton Beach track all the best 
amateur drivers in the country in an inter-city mati- 
nee to last three days. The Road Drivers will hold 
their annual parade and speedway matinees during 
the Spring, but the New York Driving Club is in a 
quandary as to where to hold the Summer trotting 
and pacing races. For several years the club has 
held its matinees at the Empire City track, but the 
fact that two running meetings under the Jockey 
Club rules and sanction will be held during the 
Summer and Fall makes it necessary for the mem- 
bers of the organization to look for another home 
where the harness -sport may be carried along un- 
interrupted. Several tracks are under consideration. 
Those being mentioned are Poughkeepsie, White 
Plains, Elkwood and Mineola. 

The location of the track is of second consideration 
to the plans for an inter-city meet. It is expected 
that the meeting will do much toward giving the 
harness horse sport a big help. The plan has the 
approval of all local light harness horsemen, and is 
the most ambitious ever attempted by a New York 
club. 

During the annual election of the Amateur Drivers' 
League of America, which was held in New York 
during the latter part of November, President George 
W. Grote of the New York Driving Club suggested 
to a number of Eastern club representatives the idea 
of holding the event in New York, and they all 
promised a hearty support without any reserve. It is 
suggested to secure if possible Brighton Beach track 
as the most convenient and best suited for the meet 
as well as the date question. 

According to the rules of the Amateur Drivers' 
League, the big event must be held at Cleveland, but 
there is every likelihood of a change being effected, 
which will transfer the event to Brighton Beach. In 
case the other members of the league insist upon 
enforcing the rule it is proposed to hold a big inter- 
city matinee in any event, inviting all the recognized 
driving clubs to participate in it. 

The cups and trophies are to be made tempting 
enough to draw to the events all the leading ama- 
teurs from all over the country, including Boston, 
Philadelphia. Pittsburg, Chicago, Cleveland, Syracuse 
and Memphis. The entries would include some of 
the best light harness horses now in training and 
make the meet the best ever held. 

President Grote's idea of a big inter-city meeting 
lasting three days, to be held at Brighton Beach, is 
universally indorsed by all leading members of the 
New York Driving Club and Road Drivers' Associa- 
tion. The question has also been discussed favor- 
ably for the reason that at the next meeting of the 
National Trotting Association it is believed the 
question of amateur driving club meetings will be 
passed upon and rules similar to those now enforced 
by the Amercan Association adopted. 

In that case the proposed meeting can be given 
by charging admission at the gate, without incur- 
ring records or bars for horses raced in the con- 
tests. One of the most enthusiastic backers of Presi- 
dent Grote's project is W. F. Bradley, who has 
promised that if the plan is carried through he will 
enter Major Delmar and George G., while it is 
certain that E. T. Stotesbury of Philadelphia will 
send over Sweet Marie, and other trotters and pacers 
of note will be here to race for the prizes. Similar 
promises have been made by all the leading horse- 
men of the city, so that big fields of starters are 
assured. 

Speaking of the plan of holding an inter-city meet- 
ing, a local horseman who has long been identified 
with road driving and matinee racing said: 

"When Grand Circuit meetings were held two 
weeks each year at Empire City and Brighton Beach, 
interest in the harness horse and sport was naturally 
kept up, but now that they have been abandoned 
l>erhaps for good, something must be done to keep 
the sport alive, or one might probably say to re- 
vive it. 

"I think the idea of holding an inter-city meeting 
of the magnitude as planned by President Grote is 
an admirable one, and the most feasible means of 
increasing the popularity of the sport. There is 
absolutely no reason why New York should depend 
upon outsiders to make this meeting, or a series of 
meetings, a success, as there are enough horses 
owned in Greater New York and nearby cities in 
Jersey to furnish more entries than are needed. 
Every season one hears of challenges among different 
amateur clubs and this will be an excellent way to 
bring horsemen together for all the racing they 
want. 

"As long as racing rules permit the charging of 
admission such meetings can oe made to earn ex- 
penses and offer handsome prizes for each race, 
while it will prove most attractive to that class of 
the public who love the harness sport when con- 
ducted in the right manner." 

Before the Spring is advanced something of a 
more definite nature will be known of the proposed 
meeting, and if the present sentiment remains as 
it is there is every insurance that the amateur 
sport around New York this year will be livelier 
than any past season, while the half-mile tracks 
will give many professional matinees. 



Saturday, February 8, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THE STORY OF CONEY 2:02. 



[G. H. Perrigo in Chicago Horseman.] 
"On January 18th the famous gelding Coney 2:02 
died at West Newton. Mass. He was apparently in 
good health, but after partaking of his meal laid 
down in his stall and when an attendant went to 
speak to him he did not respond, and an examination 
snowed that he was dead. A peculiar phase of the 
affair was that his eyes were open and his limbs were 
in a natural position, not stiffened as is usually the 
case when death occurs. An autopsy will be held to 
ascertain the cause of his death." Such was the 
meager report announcing the death of what was 
in the early portion of the season of 1899 the most 
talked of pacer in America. It will be noticed that 
even in death Coney was different from other horses, 
a fact that was in keeping with his entire career. 

It is doubtful whether there have been any horses 
of recent date which have caused greater joy and 
grief to their various owners that did Coney. With 
him, as with Ryland T. 2:07%, a meritorious per- 
formance was almost always followed by a total dis- 
appointment. Perhaps Coney was not entirely to 
blame. A terrible attack of distemper the spring pre- 
ceding his four-year-old debut left his constitution 
so undermined that he was hardly physically able to 
cope with the Grand Circuit stars, which he met in 
that eventful first year's campaign. Coming as he 
did from the stable of the late Thomas E. Keating, 
the California manager, who was at that time ably 
taking the place of the late Monroe Salisbury as 
the leader of the annual invasion from the Golden 
State and whose stable had brought East such stars 
of the pacing brigade as Anaconda 2:01%, Klatawah 
(3) 2:05%, Searchlight 2:03% and such trotters as 
Dione 2:07%, Owyhee 2:11, etc., he was naturally 
very much in the limelight from the day he began 
to show such astounding bursts of speed in his work 
in his native State, up to the time of his first start 
at Denver in June. Only his vast amount of speed 
tempted Mr. Keating to race him in 1899. He had, 
however, been heavily staked down the circuit and 
it was in the hopes of saving some of this entrance 
that any effort was made to race Coney at all. It is 
probable that the black gelding never entirely recov- 
ered from the grueling campaign he underwent that 
season when in no condition to race. His efforts in 
after years seemed to bear out this assertion. His 
brilliant performances did not follow one another 
with the regularity of those of Star Pointer, John 
R. Gentry, Joe Patchen and Robert J., but were 
occasional dashes which gave but an indication of 
what the black whirlwind would have done had he 
been in perfect condition. 

Coney was foaled in 1895 and was bred by John 
W. Gardner, Los Angeles, Cal. His breeding was 
eycellent and he was sired by the great McKinney 
2:11% (the leading sire of 2:10 speed), while his 
dam was Grace Kaiser, also the dam of McZeus 2:13, 
a son of George Wilkes, while the second dam was 
Grace W., by Comet. He was a good sized black 
gelding of a decidedly racy conformation and was 
a very fast, rapid gaited pacer. In his early train- 
iing he gave great promise and Keating, always on 
the lookout for budding phenoms, soon arranged to 
manage him. That was in 1899. The gelding came 
fast all that winter and spring until late in the 
spring when he was taken with the distemper. But 
as before stated so many valuable dates had been 
made for him that it was determined to race him 
anyway. As usual the Keating stable made its first 
starts at Denver, where M. E. McHenry took charge 
of them to do the driving. There Coney was put in 
three races and while he won them all did not by 
any means create a favorable impression. His first 
start resulted in an easy victory, but in the second 
he showed what he would do when pinched. In 
the first heat he made two bad breaks and just beat 
the flag. After that it was easy for him although he 
stepped the first quarter of the second heat in :31, 
the half in 1:02%, and then pulled up and came home 
in 3 : 1 4 In this third attempt he made a very 

poor showing although his enormous burst of speed 
made it possible for him to win after acting very 
badly. 

These races showed Keating that something radi- 
cal would have to be done with Coney if he was to 
make even a creditable showing in his next race, 
the Chamber of Commerce stake for $5,000 at De- 
troit in July. After a great deal of deliberation it 
was decided to put the hopples on him. McHenry 
somewhat reluctantly consented and the day of the 
race made his first public appearance behind a 
hoppled pacer. The field was made up of twelve 
pacers which included Shade On 2:08; Carmelita 
2:09%; Annie Thornton 2:10%; Wandering Jew 
2:09%, and The Private 2:07%. Despite the un- 
certainty as to how he would behave with the new 
gear Coney was made the favorite, selling for $75 
to $100 for the field. In the first heat all went well, 
Coney winning it handily in 2:09. But in the second 
heat the trouble began. Coney was stepping down 
the backstretch with a comfortable lead of several 
lengths when the public began to see that he was 
trying to break. Try as he would McHenry could not 
ward off the inevitable and at the five-eighths pole 
Coney went up in the air in a lunging tangle. The 
entire field passed him and it was with difficulty 
that he beat the flag. In the third heat he made a 
jump at the quarter from which he recovered handi- 
ly but another at the thee-quarters destroyed his 
chances and he finished third. In the fourth heat he 
kept his feet but tired in the stretch and Shade On 
beat him home. 



The following week at Cleveland he had a new 
driver as John Kelly had the mount behind him. 
Again Coney was the choice, bringing $40 while the 
field brought $50. Among his opponents were Bob 
Fitzsimmons 2: 07*1, Shade On and Wandering Jew. 
His manners were much Improved and pacing to the 
half in 1:03 he walked home in 2:13%. Rain then 
fell and the race went over until 'he following day. 
Coney won the second heat in 2:lu% but tired bad- 
ly and Bob Fitzsimmons won the nevt three. It 
was a good pertoi niance and hart the gelding had 
sufficient work he would pobably have won in 
straight heats. He was laid up the week of Colum- 
bus, but at Buffalo, with McHenry back in I ho sulky 
landed the sii ; kc in 2:13%, 2:09% and 2.12%, pac- 
ing the first half of the second- hear in 1:02?) and 
beating Toboggan 2:08%, Lizzie Wilkes 2:08%, 
Wandering Jew and others. He repeated at Glen 
Falls by pacing in 2:07%, 2:09% and 2:08%. The 
rules barred the hopples at Readville, hence it was 
not surprising that Coney should have made breaks 
there and finished behind the money. At Hartford 
they were put on him again and he gave Billy An- 
drews 2:06% warm argument, making him go in 
2:06%, 2:07% and 2:10 to win. In the last heat 
McHenry made a try and went to the half in 1:02. 
There Coney tired and was eased up, finishing third. 
The hopples were barred at Empire City also and the 
son of McKinney finished behind the bunting. He 
was the favorite in the Roger Williams stake at 
Providence and won the first heat in 2:08% but was 
then taken sick and the race went to Island Wilkes 
Jr. His last start of the year was at the Parkway half- 
mile track, near Brooklyn, where he finished fourth 
in a star field of free-for-all pacers to Prince Alert 
1:59%; Roan Wilkes 2:04%, and Democracy 2:07. 
In that race he was driven by Bert Shank. Coney 
was consigned to the Old Glory sale that fall along 
with some others fom the Keating stable and was 
bid in by D. W. Maloney for $1,160. During the 
year he stated in twelve races, won five, was second 
in four, fourth in one, and twice unplaced, winning 
$5,925. 

The following year was probably his best as in 
ten races he won five, was second in three and un- 
placed in two, winning $4,675 against the best pacers 
of the day and 1900 boasted of some giants among 
the side-wheelers. He opened at Windsor where he 
finished second to Billy Andrews, three heats in 
2:07%, 2:07 and 2:06%, driven by Bert Shank. M. 
E. McHenry then took the gelding again and at 
Detroit started him in the 2:06 pace against William 
Mac, Prince Alert and others. In the first heat he 
made a break and finished sixth, but in the second 
he trailed William Mac, Billy Andrews and Free 
Bond to the quarter in :30, the half in 1:00%, the 
three-quarters in 1:32%, and then moved up to the 
leaders for the final brush home. The heat appeared 
to be his when he caught William Mac at the dis- 
tance, but Ben Walker was coming fast with Prince 
Alert and Coney seemed to hang so the hoppled 
Prince was able to beat him a nose in 2:05. In the 
third heat Coney broke his hopples on the first turn 
and was laid up. That race put him on edge for 
his record breaking performance the following week 
at Cleveland, when he lowered the world's record 
for five-year-old pacing geldings to 2:02%, where 
it still stands, and scored his greatest victory. The 
field was a hard one, it being made up of Prince 
Alert 1:59%; Ace 2:05%; William Mac 2:05%; The 
Maid 2:05%; Indiana 2:04%; Don 2:07%; Billy 
Andrews 2:06%; Exploit 2:08%; Eyelet 2:06%, and 
Free Bond 2:04%. The betting was heavy and public 
interest ran high. Prince Alert and Coney were 
about equal choices, bringing $200 each, while the 
field sold for $300. McHenry never made a move the 
first heat and Prince Alert won it in easy fashion. 
He then sold for 2 to 1 against the entire field. The 
moment had arrived for Coney's star to reach its 
ascendancy and McHenry was not slow to take ad- 
vantage of the opportunity. Prince Alert sailed away 
in the lead, wiht Free Bond at his side and Coney 
at the latter's wheel. The quarter was in :30%, the 
half in 1:00%, and the three-quarters in 1:31%. 
The Alert horse was flying a 2:00 clip himself, but 
McHenry sat down on Coney and made his drive. 
The black fellow answered the summons like a 
cyclone and was soon catching Prince Alert at every 
stride. The grandstand rose to its feet as one man 
and watched the duel between the two hoppled kings 
with breathless anxiety. At the distance Coney's 
nose showed in front and from there home McHenry 
began taking him up and he finished in 2:02%, mere- 
ly jogging. It was said at the time that no horse 
had ever paced so fast a mile and finished so easily. 
Brine?' Alert, and Hilly Andrews lead to the stretch, 
where Coney passed them and won the next heat and 
race in 2:04%. That was the day of Coney's tri- 
umph, The critics who had been terming him soft 
hearted and unreliable changed their tune and at 
once proclaimed him a star of great magnitude. He 
followed that up by two easy victories at. Columbus 
and Olean, N. Y. At the former city he won the 
2:07 pace in 2:06%, 2:07 and 2:05%, and at Olean 
beat, his stablemate Anaconda in an exhibition in 
2:08% and 2:10% over a half-mile track. In the 
latter race he was driven by Billy Andrews. But at 
Glen Falls he passed into a partial eclipse, for he 
acted very bad at the score and was finally sent 
away on a standstill break. Although he paced fast 
the distance was too great and he got the banner. 
He was then laid up for a few weeks, making his 
next appearance at Hartford, against Prince Alert 
and Indiana. The race was supposed to be between 
Alert and Coney, but the Prince was sick and to 
the surprise of the talent the rank outsider Indiana 



won, with Coney second the last two heats, in 
2:05, 2:04% and 2:08. At Terre Haute, Coney was 
driven by Edwin Gaylord, of Denver, in a successful 
effort to lower the world's record to wagon for 
amateur drivers; at. the time held by Mr. C. K. 
G. Bilings, with Free Bond by a mile in 2:04%. and 
succeeded by stepping one in 2: <>:',% . He also made 
two starts at St. Louis in match races. The first, of 
these he lost to Joe Patchen in 2:05 and 2:04%, but 
two days later beat his stablemate, Hettie G., in 
2:05% and 2:05% to wagon. His last race was at 
I, os Angeles. Cat. where he won a $2.uu0 free-for-all, 
driven by Johnnie Blue, from .Little Thome 2:07%, 
Anaconda and Clipper 2:06, in 2:09%, 2:08%, and 
2:08. 

Thomas E. Keating had died during the 1900 meet- 
ingat Lexington and James Butler concluded to sell 
the bulk of his horses as he had difficulty in securing 
a man to take Keating's place as manager of his rac- 
ing stable. The horses were sent to the Midwinter 
sale. Coney elicted spirited bidding and brought 
$4,100. His career that year opened brilliantly, but 
was not. sustained. He was driven by Andy McDow- 
ell and started but twice — at Detroit and Cleveland — 
finishing second and third. The free-for-all field at 
Detroit that year was made up of Anaconda 2:03%; 
Indiana 2:04%, and Coney. Anaconda, "the snake 
horse," was the favorite, but for a while Coney made 
his backers feel uneasy. Indiana drew the pole, 
but when the word was given Coney took it at once 
and waltzing over to the quarter in :29%, the half 
in 1:00, the three-quarters in 1:31% and home in 
2:02, equaled the world's record for a pacing gelding 
and lowered the Grosse Point track record. Ana- 
conda tried to catch him, but failed. The clip in 
the second heat was even faster. Anaconda was 
in hot pursuit of Coney and they were at the quarter 
in :29. Down the back stretch Anaconda kept gain- 
ing and at the half in :59% Coney became dizzy and 
made a bad break. By the time he had caught Ana- 
conda was far in front, but as neither Indiana nor 
Connor could force Anaconda out McDowell tried 
again with Coney. He cut down the long lead to 
two lengths and then gave up the task. Anaconda 
winning in 2:02%. Again in the third did Coney try 
to keep foot with his rival, but it was no use and he 
tired badly, Connor beating him for the place and 
Anaconda winning in 2:05%. At Cleveland he 
showed only flashes of his speed and won third 
money to Anaconda and Connor in 2:06 and 2:08%. 

Coney did not start in 1902. In 1903 he made but 
one start and that was at Cleveland. He was but a 
shadow of his former self and in no condition to 
race During the race he bled badly and was dis- 
tanced by Dan R. and Anaconc.a in 2:05%. His next 
appearance at the races was in Dakota early in June 
of 1904. His campaign also extended into Nebraska, 
but it was not a success as out of five races he was 
fourth three times and unplaced twice. In 1905 be 
also started three times over the Nebraska bush 
tracks and was second twice and third once. In 
1906 he was matineed in Illinois and in the spring 
of 1907 was purchased at the Indianapolis sale by 
A. II. Merrill, of Danvers, Mass., and taken to New 
England, where he died. A complete recapitulation 
of his career shows that he started in thirty-three 
races, won ten, was second in ten, third in two, fourth 
in four and seven times unplaced, winning $11,820. 

Such is the story of Coney. Fast as he was it is 
probable that had he not been raced during his 
four-year-old season before he had recovered from 
the effects of his illness, he would have at least 
touched the 2:00 mark. During his career on the 
Grand Circuit he was always a sensation and caused 
the bettors many an anxious moment. But now all 
is ended and the great pacer has gone the way of all 
things mortal "After life's fitful fever he sleeps 
well." 

o 

CHICAGO HORSE MARKET. 



As the spring approaches, says the Breeders' Ga- 
zette, the tone of the horse market improves. Never 
in the history of the trade in the West has there 
been such an insistent inquiry for farm workers. Not 
only has this demand developed unprecedented pro- 
portions, but it has begun much earlier than usual 
and more farmers are visiting the cities in person 
to make their selections. In some instances farmers 
in a locality have pooled their money and sent rep- 
resentatives, taking carloads. This early purchasing 
is very sensible indeed, but it is quite; plain that as 
February passes the farm demand must assume 
much larger proportions. This certainly does not 
look as though there can be much of a surplus con- 
cealed in the breeding districts. Another feature 
of the trade just as present is the number of farmers 
who are seeking to buy second-hand horses that have 
been used in cities. Carload after carload of these 
animals, all more or less sore footed, has gone into 
the country and at prices not much lower than first 
cost in the rural regions. The cessation of activity 
in teaming circles during I he last three months of 
last year threw many good workers onto the market. 
The big teaming concerns, always eager to buy 
"bard" horses accustomed to city feed and life, 
snapped up the better offerings of this kind quickly, 
leaving only the sorer sorts to go back on the laud. 
Prices are advancing all along the lino, and no one 
would be surprised to see them back on the old 
high level by March 1st. 

— ' 

The Stallion Number of the Breeder and Sportsman, 
out next week, should be read by every horse owner. 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 8, 1908. 



{ 9 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT 



REDWOOD PARKS AND FOREST RESERVES. 

One of the most public spirited gifts ever made 
to the Government has come from William Kent of 
Chicago, who has just deeded to the United States 
295 acres of primeval redwood forest on the southern 
slope of Mt. Tamalpais, about six miles from the 
city of San Francisco. The land was deeded to the 
Government with the approval of Forester Gifford 
Plnchot, Chief of the United States Forest Service. 
The papers have now gone to the Secretary of the 
Interior and a proclamation declaring the canyon 
a National Monument will be signed at an early date. 

This means that more of California's redwood 
giants will be saved for the scientific study and 
pleasure of the whole country, in fact, the whole 
world, for the great sequoias are only found in the 
Golden State. This grove given to the Government 
by Mr. Kent is one of the few tracts of redwood for- 
ests to be found in its natural state in California 
to-day. The land is said to have cost Mr. Kent 
$4 (,000 some years ago, but its stand of. redwood 
timber alone is now valued at more than $150,000 
on the market. 

The canyons of Tamalpais, which drain into San 
Francisco Hay, were cut clean years ago, the red- 
wood obtained from them went into the construction 
of the old San Francisco. The giants on this new 
reserved tract, to be known as "Mulr Woods," es- 
caped the axe, however, chieflly because the outlet 
is on the ocean side instead of the bay side, and also 
because the various owners of the land have for 
sentimental reasons jealously guarded the timber 
from harm or destruction. Modern methods of log- 
ging would make short work of the timber, and 
would besides put a handsome profit in the hands 
of the owners. 

It is the intention to name the National Monument 
"Muir Woods," after John Muir, the noted naturalist. 
The giants of Redwood Canyon will now be given 
permanent protection by virture of the act of June 
8, 1906, which provides that objects of scientific in- 
terest may be declared National Monuments for 
their preservation and protection. This 295-acre 
tract will be a pleasure ground as well as a place 
for scientific study for the people of the whole of 
California, for within a radius of 52 miles of the 
canyon two-thirds of the population of the entire 
State are centered. 

The chief reason for the permanent protection of 
the land by the Government is that there is no other 
redwood grove in the whole world more accessible 
to so many people. The canyon is in absolutely 
primeval condition, not so much as scratched by the 
hands of man. It lies within an hour's ride of San 
Francisco, at the very doors of hundreds of thou- 
sands of people. 

So long as the land remains in private ownership 
there is always danger that the trees will be at- 
tacked, and Mr. Kent feared this, but as a National 
Monument they will be safe for all times. There 
are, of course, many finer stands of redwood in 
California, but there are no typical groves owned 
by the United States, nor are there any which might 
be acquired by the Government except. at great ex- 
pense. 

Originally this land was part of the old Spanish 
grant, Rancho Sausalito. Mr. Kent purchased the 
land some years ago for a sum said to be about $47,- 
000. To insure the preservation of the redwoods 
for the instruction and enjoyment of all the people 
for the years to come, he has now deeded the tract 
to the United States as a gift. The largest redwoods 
are eighteen feet in diameter at the butt and will 
approach three hundred feet in height, rising with 
perfectly straight and clean stems. As none of the 
big trees have been cut, their age is, of course, some- 
what problematical, but it is safe to say that the 
veterans have stood from one thousand to fifteen 
hundred years. 

The total stand of redwood, roughly estimated, is 
about 30,000,000 feet, with some 5,000.000 feet of fir 
and a very considerable amount of tanbark oak. The 
redwood alone, at a fair valuation has a market 
value of $150,000, as it stands. Except for a narrow 
strip of brush along the east border and a fringe 
along the southwest line, the whole canyon is cov- 
ered with a dense forest growth. The stand is 
heaviest along the creek and on the lower slopes, 
becoming poorer above. Redwood is the dominating 
tree, towering high above everything else and form- 
ing fully three-fourths of the whole forest. Douglas 
fir Is next in importance, and Mattered over the en- 
tire tract are all the various hardwoods common to 
the region, chief among which are the numerous 
oaks, madrone, alder, maple and mountain laurel, 
all of which form a kind of dwarf underwood to the 
lofty redwood and fir. The redwood occurs both in 
big and small groups, and by single trees, while the 
other species are sprinkled throughout. 

The destruction of redwood by lumbering has been 
so rapid in the last decade that it is now only a 
question of years when the original growth will 
have wholly disappeared. Its extraordinary scientific 
and educational value, along with the fact that it is 



a pleasure ground for all of the people who live in 
or visit this part of California, makes the wood an 
ideal National Monument. 



In response to a recent rumor that many of the 
Dig Basin redwood trees were being cut down and 
other damage being done in this magnificent public 
domain, the San Jose Herald sent a special corres- 
pondent who visited the State Park at Boulder Creek 
recently, with a view to ascertain the truth of the 
reports that "the woodsman's axe threatened the big 
trees and action on the part of lumbermen threatened 
to rob the park of its interest." 

The writer's story states: "As we sped down the 
hill into Camp Sempervirens, we met the Warden, 
S. H. Rambo, and Park Guardian J. Creed, and our 
credentials presented to the Warden gained us every 
facility, that we might present to the readers of the 
Herald a clear, unbiased statement of actual condi- 
tions and the necessities arising that created them. 
The woodsman and his axe were there, but, unlike 
the ruthless slaughter of the average woodcutter, 
here a different system prevails. Each axe that 
flashes its shining blade, each saw that steadily cuts 
its swath, is guided by the hands of workmen whose 
every move is under the personal direction of the 
Warden. 

"Not a tree is being cut except those withering 
and useless, a constant menace to life and limb; 
and the dead trees, splendid specimens of the Sem- 
pervirens, towering hundreds of feet in the air, 
black, gaunt and limbless, stripped of their foliage 
until like huge darning needles they pierce the sky, 
are carefully exempted from the woodsman's axe. 
No live standing timber is being cut, except in two 
or three instances where they lean dangerously over 
the road or camps, and the safety of visitors and 
campers demands their removal. 

"At Camp Sempervirens, a beautiful spot, aptly 
chosen by A. P. Hill of San Jose as the camping 
place for the Sempervirens Club, is where the woods- 
men are now located. Five years ago, when I was 
there with the Sempervirens, this spot was the ad- 
miration of all. Two years later fire had left naught 
but the blackened trunks of the forest monarchs, 
set in an ash-begrimed waste. 

"The fire raged with terrible fierceness in this par- 
ticular locality, and, seeking an explanation from old 
woodsmen and forest fire-fighters, we found it was 
owing to the vast accumulation of limbs, dead and 
rotten wood, shavings, slabs, logging and waste ma- 
terial left lying on the ground by shake, post and 
tie makers. In some places these piles of debris 
were ten feet deep, and so covered by underbrush and 
new growth as to be entirely concealed from view. 
Vast quantities of this material lay on the ground 
under the trees in the vicinity of Camp Sempervirens 
for years, with never an effort to remove it. Dry as 
tinder, it became a scorching, searing fire that 
swept the trees from ground to sky line, denuding 
them of every vestige of foliage and killing many; 
and there they stand to-day, mute but eloquent wit- 
nesses of misdirected forestry work. In many cases 
the thick redwood bark saved the heart of the tree, 
and slowly the frightful scars of the fiery holocaust 
are being concealed by a graceful drapery of young 
shoots from the trunk that will in time develop 
limbs. 

"To prevent a repetition of such destructive fires 
is the object of the present operations within the 
park. Park Warden S. H. Rambo said: 'No con- 
tract has been let for burning over the area of the 
park. No cutting is allowed where it will endanger 
standing growth, such as madrone. oak. lilac, azaleas, 
the graceful huckleberry, ferns and other natural 
coverings of the ground. On the other hand, the ac- 
cumulation of dead growth, limbs, tree tops and 
entire trees that have been shattered and riven by 
flame and decay will be worked up into wood, and 
the debris burned. Where this burning is intelli- 
gently done, no damage results to other growth, and 
the following spring the scar of ashes is covered 
by Nature's green coating of ferns and trailing "vines. 
By these means we hope to protect these beauty 
spots, such as Camp Sempervirens and the like, from 
other destructive visitations by fire, and, incidentally, 
in certain localities, provide additional camping 
grounds. No lumbermen are in the park cutting out 
the timber; and such ruthless, wanton destruction 
as their operations entail will not under any possi- 
ble conditions be tolerated, but at all times the 
natural beauty of the park will be conserved and 
encouraged to its highest point of development, ever 
keeping in view the fact that this vast playground 
has been set aside by the State for the pleasure of 
the whole people. 

"And in the fire-swept gulches and on the barren 
denuded slopes of the hills every chance will be 
given the new, oncoming undergrowth to re-carpet 
and restore to its original primeval beauty the 
glories of this vast forestic panorama. 

"W. M. Elsom. who has the contract for cutting 
up the dead and down timber in the Big Basin State 



Redwood Park, laughs at the report that good trees 
are being cut down in California's famous park, the 
pride of Santa Cruz county. 

"The Sempervirens Club of San Jose, which made 
the park its special care since it was bought by the 
State a number of years ago, has been investigating 
the matter, and Mr. Elsom is curious to know how 
this report, like so many false rumors, got abroad. 
Said he: 

"There is not a tree being cut in the park except 
those that are marked by the Warden as thoroughly 
killed and useless. There are a few dead trees which 
have fallen or are leaning against live trees, and 
you may be sure that Deputy Warden Creed, who is 
a thorough woodsman, would never mark a tree for 
cutting unless it was dangerous to keep it there. 

"If the Sempervirens Club would come in full force 
to the park, I would be delighted, and I'm sure that 
they would be pleased with the work that has been 
done. I'm just as much interested in preserving 
the beauty of the park as anyone, for 1 take hun- 
dreds of tourists to the park every year in my livery 
business. 

"The taking out of these trees not only prevents 
fire from spreading, but will enable the fire fighters, 
in case there is any fire in the surrounding country, 
to get from one ridge to another with wagons and 
teams. 

"Creed knows trees as well as any member of the 
Sempervirens Club, and he loves trees and wants to 
preserve them. I don't believe you could offer him 
any inducement to mark a tree that shouldn't come 
down. I don't believe there is anybody who would 
attempt to get him to do such a thing. The Sem- 
pervirens Club can rest easy. We're only cutting 
up the dead and down timber, and the park will be 
better for it." 



A decision of great importance not alone to this 
State, but to every section of the country containing 
forest reserves and game laws was unanimously ar- 
rived at during the forest rangers' sessions at Santa 
Barbara, January 29th. It is that the reserve men 
will in future decline to act as game wardens, and 
that each county must appoint its own special offi- 
cers for the purpose of enforcing local or State game 
ordinances, without looking to the rangers for direct 
assistance, although it was the sense of the meeting 
that there would be no objection to acting indirectly 
in co-operation with properly appointed game war- 
dens. 

The impression has prevailed from the very ini- 
tiation of the service that the work of game war- 
den was practically part of a ranger's duties. The 
regulations say nothing of the sort. It is true, the 
service has in the past shown a willingness to assist 
in enforcing the game laws, and accepted appoint- 
ments as deputies under the State Fish Commis- 
sioners, but for various reasons which were fully 
threshed out during the rangers' sessions they will 
do so no longer. 

In the first place, if the rangers are to keep an 
eye on the hunters it keeps them hopping, and it will 
be practically impossible to do anything else at the 
season when they are most needed at their proper 
duties of patroling to guard against fires, keeping 
up the trails, seeing that the ranges are not over- 
stocked and so on. In the second place, experience 
has shown that the rangers can make more enemies 
to the square inch acting as game wardens than 
in any other known manner. Such unpopularity 
seriously impairs their efficiency. 

The next matter in point of consequence was the 
attendance at the sessions of President Eastman of 
the Santa Barbara Stockmen's Association. The 
regulations require that if any stockmen's associa- 
tion exists in the locality, a representative shall be 
requested to attend the rangers' meetings. Mr. 
Eastman is manager of the Sisquoc Cattle Ranch, 
which not only has large holdings of patented land, 
but also a permit to run cattle on a portion of the 
reserve. This portion extends up the Sisquoc Canyon 
clear to the summit of Big Pine Mountain. 

Mr. Eastman addressed the meeting, expressing 
his personal appreciation of the work of the forest 
service, and assuring it of the support and hearty 
co-operation of his association. The value to the 
country in the preservation of brush and timber Mr. 
Eastman said could not be estimated in dollars. 
But the great and signal benefit of the reserves from 
the association's point of view lay in the fact that 
the rangers set a limit to the depreciations of sheep- 
men and put down any tresspassing on the part of 
these undesirable denizens of the stock world with 
a stern hand. 

Discussions brought out the fact that no sheep are 
allowed in the Santa Barbara reserve save in a por- 
tion of Kern county, lying northeast of Mt. Pinos, on 
the extreme northern extremity of Ventura county. 
Here there have always been several Masques, who 
usd to get periodicaly roped and dragged around 
the ranges they invaded with their flocks by exasper- 
ated cattlemen before the reserves were created. 

A curious regulation in connection with grazing 
rights was brought to light in the requirement that 
the rangers watch those who have permits and see 
that they salt their cattle. Now that regulation, as 
many rangers in this reserve testified, was evident- 
ly drawn up in Washington without knowledge of 
conditions existing in California and the Santa Bar- 
bara reserve in particular. Natural salt licks abound 
on the reserve, and the creeks are lined with alkali 
that in many places forms a crust half an inch thick. 



Saturday, February 8, 1908.] 



THE BREEDER 



AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



A RE-HABILITATED HUNTING GROUND. 



A. K. C. (INCORPORATED), VICTORIOUS. 



Isolated and remote from the whirl and noise of 
civilization is the Elk River Valley, in the southeast- 
ern part of the Kootenay District of British Colum- 
bia, northeast of Spokane, which to-day is doc'ared 
by seasoned sportsmen to be one of the most prolific 
and varied big game ranges on the American conti- 
nent. Elk roam the valley in bands of hundreds, 
and beavers have colonized by the thousands. This 
is due largely to the restrictions adopted by the 
Provincial Government, and the excellent grazing 
range afforded. Elk and beaver have been protected 
since 1905, and the close season will continue until 
1911. 

R. L. Laird of Spokane has explored parts of the 
valley. He declares that the measure of protection 
afforded the big game in the preserve has not been 
half-hearted; in fact, he adds, it is the belief of 
Government officials, guides and others familiar with 
the district that the law has been strictly observed, 
with the result that the deer, elk, bear, goats, moun- 
tain sheep, beaver and other fur-bearing animals 
have increased at so rapid a rate that they are to- 
day probably more abundant than at any other period 
within the last half-century. 

The valley stretches eight to ten miles wide and 
is abundantly watered by the swift Elk River, which 
is literally alive with the gamest trout that ever 
fought for the angler's fly. On the uplands are thou- 
sands of acres of grazing land, covered with a thick 
growth of grass, resembling the prairie wool, which 
makes the cattle ranges of Alberta and Saskatche- 
wan unrivaled, horses preferring it to timothy. This 
grass cures itself and affords an ideal range for elk, 
deer, goats and big-horn sheep. 

For countless years, the valley of the Elk River 
was the famous hunting ground for Indians, who an- 
nually gathered there to restock their larders for the 
winter. When the white men arrived and began 
their usual tactics with regard to the elk and beaver, 
the game dwindled rapidly and there was grave dan- 
ger of the extinction of both varieties. Realizing 
this, the Canadian Government declared a long close 
season and the game obtained a fresh lease of life. 
o 

California Rod and Reel Club. — The Rod and Reel 
Club rounded out the first year of its prosperous ex- 
istence last week with an annual meeting, at which 
officers were elected and matters put in shape for 
the coming season. 



The new officers elected are: E. L. Hedderly, 
president (re-elected); E. E. Salyer, vice-president; 
Roy Shaer, recording secretary; H. W. Coomber, 
treasurer. 

President Hedderly in a brief address outlined the 
plans for the coming season and reviewed the work 
of the past. The club has been a success in every 
way and has a constantly growing membership. 

A committee was appointed to confer with David 
Starr Jordan and learn from him when it would 
please him to meet the club at a dinner, to be given 
in his honor at some future date. Among those on 
the committee are Judge H. H. Rose, Max Loewen- 
thal, O. R. W. Robinson and Prof. Charles F. 
Holder. 

Many subjects of interest to the club were dis- 
cussed in a general way. 

The club is in a very prosperous condition and 
has a membership of about 250, which is almost 
double the number on the list at the last annual 
meeting. About a dozen new members were taken 
in last night. There were some preliminary ar- 
rangements talked of for the annual fish tournament 
during the summer, but nothing definite was de- 
cided upon. It is possible a club-house will be erect- 
ed this year and this subject will be fully discussed 
at the next meeting, to be held in about a month. 



A San Antoine Idyll. — Charley Landresse is re- 
sponsible for the following, overheard on the San 
Antone recently: 

Willie Heelygrass, "How's the fishing?" 

Garge Hooks, "Good!" 

Heely, "Catch anything?" 

Hooks, "Nope, !" 

Heely, "Then wliy do you say its good?" 

Hooks, "It must be, for the fish are all there yet." 

Landresse and pardner laughed so much that they 
missed the train and stayed over night In i In- 
chicken metropolis. 



Fish Law Violated. — A reliable report comes from 
Marin county that the proprietor of a hotel at Camp 
Taylor in making a swimming pool in Lagunitas 
creek neglected to put in a fish ladder as required 
by law. Fish recently were unable to get above 
the dam. This is a matter that the Fish Commis- 
sion should take up at once. 



That portion of the Chamberlain tract upon which 
are located the Cordelia, String, Fair and President 
ponds, which was recently purchased by Louis 
Titus from the present owners of the entire tract, 
has just been leased to the sportsmen who formerly 
comprised the Cordelfa Club. The members are 
Charles W. Kellogg, Capt. H. F. Portman, W. 15. 
Tubb, W. B. Bradford, Dr. George E. Davis. 



The internecine troubles of the American Kennel 
Club were brought to a close January 22d. when. the 
administration scored an emphatic victory over the 
Ashland House Committee by electing eighteen mem- 
bers of the arbitration committee, against two elect- 
ed by the rival faction. It was a complete vindica- 
tion for August Belmont, the president, and his as- 
sociates on the board, states the New York Times. 
The arbitration committee, which will adjust the 
differences between the rival factions, is composed 
of thirty members of the club. The administration 
will have twenty-three votes and the Ashland House 
Committee seven. These include the three members 
elected two weeks ago. who were nominated on both 
tickets. 

After the vote was announced the tellers agreed 
to appoint the lawyers representing each faction a 
committee to agree upon a date to call the arbitration 
committee together to organize and make a final dis- 
position of the policy of the club. According to the 
terms of agreement between the factions, the arbi- 
tration committee will meet as soon as possible and 
elect a chairman and secretary. A mail vote will 
then be taken of the entire committee to determine 
whether the club as it now stands is properly incor- 
porated, or whether it will be for the best interests 
of the club to reincorporate, and if so, upon what 
lines. 

Should the arbitration committee decide that the 
club should be reincorporated, it will have full power 
and authority to do so and adopt a constitution. II 
will also elect a Board of Directors and take over 
the assets, effects, and name of the American Ken- 
nel Club. An effort will be made to secure the recom- 
mendations of the committee before the annual meet- 
ing of the club, which takes place February 13th. 

There is a difference of opinion as to the future 
of the policy of the club. The administration as- 
serts that it is a complete, sweeping vindivation for 
it. The members of the Ashland House Committee 
regard the result of the election as a triumph for 
their long-continued efforts, and say that the club 
will positively be reincorporated. They admit that 
they did not expect to win the majority of votes at 
the election, but declare that the sentiment among 
the members of the arbitration committee is over- 
whelmingly in favor of reincorporation. It was de- 
nied by several of the Ashland House Committee 
that there was any opposition to the administration 
of the affairs of the club, but that the fight was waged 
entirely on the method adopted to incorporate the 
club. 

The election board met at 11 o'clock on the 22d 
at the club offices, 55 Liberty street. Pinkerton de- 
tectives were stationed at each of the doors leading 
to the committee room, where the ballots were 
opened and counted. At the last minute it was de- 
cided to make the session a closed one. Laurence 
M. D. McGuire and Howard Willets acted as tellers, 
Attorneys G. H. Taylor and R. D. Murray watched 
the interests of the American Kennel Club and the 
Ashland House Committee, respectively, and Secre- 
tary A. P. Vred